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Walt Disney - the Triumph of the American…
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Walt Disney - the Triumph of the American Imagination (edição 2006)

por Neal Gabler (Autor)

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7601822,556 (4.13)9
"Seven years in the making and meticulously researched - Gabler is the first writer to be given complete access to the Disney archives - this is the full story of a man whose work left an ineradicable brand on our culture but whose life has largely been enshrouded in myth." "Gabler shows us the young Walt Disney breaking free of a heartland childhood of discipline and deprivation and making his way to Hollywood. We see the visionary, whose desire for escape honed an innate sense of what people wanted to see on the screen and, when combined with iron determination and obsessive perfectionism, led him to the reinvention of animation. It was Disney, first with Mickey Mouse and then with his feature films - most notably Snow White, Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo, and Bambi - who transformed animation from a novelty based on movement to an art form that presented an illusion of life." "We see him reimagine the amusement park with Disneyland, prompting critics to coin the word Disneyfication to describe the process by which reality can be modified to fit one's personal desires. At the same time, he provided a new way to connect with American history through his live-action films and purveyed a view of the country so coherent that even today one can speak meaningfully of "Walt Disney's America." We see how the True-Life Adventure nature documentaries he produced helped create the environmental movement by sensitizing the general public to issues of conservation. And we see how he reshaped the entertainment industry by building a synergistic empire that combined film, television, theme parks, music, book publishing, and merchandise in a way that was unprecedented and was later widely imitated." "Gabler also reveals a wounded, lonely, and often disappointed man, who, despite worldwide success, was plagued with financial problems much of his life, suffered a nervous breakdown, and at times retreated into pitiable seclusion in his workshop making model trains. Gabler explores accusations that Disney was a red-baiter, an anti-Semite, an embittered alcoholic. But whatever the characterizations of Disney's personal life, he appealed to the nation by demonstrating the power of wish fulfillment and the triumph of the American imagination. Walt Disney showed how one could impose one's will on the world."--BOOK JACKET.… (mais)
Membro:evanderlee2017
Título:Walt Disney - the Triumph of the American Imagination
Autores:Neal Gabler (Autor)
Informação:Vintage Books (2006), Edition: 2nd
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Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination por Neal Gabler

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I just finished Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination by Neal GAbler.

A very interesting cradle to grave biography. While to those of us who are enchanted by Walt Disney, some of the general information is well known, but I was unaware that after World World due he disengaged and from hisanimation studio to a large degree to instead focus on what developed into Disney Land.

I found his voyage from boy, to Red Cross Volunteer in World War I, to a cartoonist/animator who along with his brother Roy ultimate founded the many renditions of Disney Studios and the creator of Mickey Mouse.

A innovative animator and entrepreneur who changed the way cartoon and animation were performed and perceived. He took the field from shorts for children to his first full length feature in Snow White. Many of what we now consider classic animation was not as financially successful at the time as we would think of it in retrospect.

Walt Disney Studios engaged in what we would consider pro war propaganda films and training films in World War II.

A giant of a man who even as he evolved in public perception in many ways never seemed to lose his midwestern persona who in spite of fame and wealth was every working man.

I would encourage those interested in business, animation, early cartoons e.g. Mickey Mouse and Walt Disney himself to read this moderately lenth biography. ( )
  dsha67 | Dec 23, 2020 |
This is a monster of a book, and dense...took me far longer to finish than I expected. Gabler covered pretty much everything and he certainly didn't "Disneyfy" Disney, but he did convey, warts and all, the brilliance that Disney was.

Recommended, even if you aren't a fan...there is much to be learned (or recounted) from the steps he took in his innovations;from animation, to sound animation, to realism, to a theme park unlike any other. Who knows if the vision of EPCOT would have been realized had he lived to see it through? He made all his other dreams comes true. ( )
  Razinha | May 23, 2017 |
Good bio. Kind of.

I did have my problems with it. The author, whether for dramatic effect or disenchantment during his research, didn't seem to be on Walt Disney's side very often. In fact it seemed to have a kind of pro-leftist union feel to it. Gabler rarely came to Disney's defense on issues, branding him constantly dissatisfied and naive, especially when it came to politics. Walt was a conservative, not for naivete, but for certain convictions. The author subtly peppers his opinion throughout the more trying times in Walt's life, and more often than not he's a little unfair.

Also, despite Gabler's attempt to soften the issue, it is plainly apparent that the unions, more than once, ruined Disney's vision and were the source of much, if not all, of what went wrong with Walt Disney Productions. Disneyland was also plagued by union labor.

If you can look past the sympathies Gabler offers Walt's enemies and the grumpy asshole he paints Walt as at times, you do actually end up with a good idea of what this great man was like. It will take a careful reader to preen the facts from Gabler's misdirection though.

One more thing. The narrative was infected with if/then clauses and other devices that make long stretches of reading obnoxious. There were other constructions too that just made me cringe when I came to them.

OK. One more thing. The author did, in agreement with other reviews, make jumps in time that were a little confusing. You will read 50 or so pages and think you have a good idea about what was happening at the time, but then he goes back and, in effect, ruins or at least alters the perception you spent the last half-hour building. It's not bad, per se, it was just, well, fucking annoying.

It's a 4-star on account of the information, but on style and delivery a less than solid 2.5

I would have liked A LOT more information on Disneyland.But that's just me. ( )
  DanielAlgara | Sep 26, 2014 |
It was never really about the money... well, almost never. Walt Disney was always more interested in "the next thing," and making money on a venture was usually just a way to finance his projects. Initially drawn to drawing and animation but burned by dishonest partners, he created his own studio to produce animated "shorts" – short Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphony cartoons shown before regular feature movies. But he was always pushing for better animation and quality, eventually creating "Snow White," the first feature-length animated movie, with the best animation for the time. But even then he wasn't breaking-even financially and eventually had to cut corners just to pay the bills. Even as his fame soared, money was tight and some movies were made just to generate income (like "Dumbo" and some live-action films). As Walt became bogged down in the studio and trying to make too many movies at once and always striving to create something bigger or better (realism in "Bambi" and high-class art in "Fantasia"), plus with WWII forcing him to rely on government work just to keep going, he became discouraged. As a result, the animation that was once the top in the industry lost its edge and Walt turned to other interests like trains and eventually television and Disneyland. But in the end he left a legacy of memorable characters and family-friendly entertainment that still continues.

Neal Gabler'sbook was especially enjoyable to read because Walt Disney is especially familiar to most of us. But I was surprised to learn that Disney was always financially strapped and borrowing anywhere he could until after Disneyland. And it was fascinating while reading to go back and watch some of the movies, like "Three Little Pigs" and "Snow White" (which I never really liked before) and compare the styles, knowing what went into them and what made them great. And visiting Disneyland after reading the book makes you look at the place differently and notice more details. But I was also surprised to learn that the genius behind "the happiest place on earth" usually wasn't a very happy man himself. Mr. Gabler describes Walt's constant need to create "control" in his surroundings that drove his efforts at perfection. Animation, his trains, and Disneyland each in turn gave him an escape from reality into an environment where he had near-total control.

Books about Walt Disney either paint him as a saint or an evil tyrant, and I guess he could be both depending on the perspective. Gabler is careful to point out where the "legends" were embellished, and that "Walt Disney" became more of a brand than a man, but I thought he portrayed him fairly and honestly. Gabler tells Disney's faults, ego, and the complaints many of his employees had, but also why he did what he did and what motivated him. It sometimes bogs down in too much detail about finances, but it not only shows why he was so culturally influential but also that he was as human as all of us.

(This review is modified from my 5/26/12 blog review at bookworm-dad.blogspot.com) ( )
  J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
It was never really about the money... well, almost never. Walt Disney was always more interested in "the next thing," and making money on a venture was usually just a way to finance his projects. Initially drawn to drawing and animation but burned by dishonest partners, he created his own studio to produce animated "shorts" – short Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphony cartoons shown before regular feature movies. But he was always pushing for better animation and quality, eventually creating "Snow White," the first feature-length animated movie, with the best animation for the time. But even then he wasn't breaking-even financially and eventually had to cut corners just to pay the bills. Even as his fame soared, money was tight and some movies were made just to generate income (like "Dumbo" and some live-action films). As Walt became bogged down in the studio and trying to make too many movies at once and always striving to create something bigger or better (realism in "Bambi" and high-class art in "Fantasia"), plus with WWII forcing him to rely on government work just to keep going, he became discouraged. As a result, the animation that was once the top in the industry lost its edge and Walt turned to other interests like trains and eventually television and Disneyland. But in the end he left a legacy of memorable characters and family-friendly entertainment that still continues.

Neal Gabler'sbook was especially enjoyable to read because Walt Disney is especially familiar to most of us. But I was surprised to learn that Disney was always financially strapped and borrowing anywhere he could until after Disneyland. And it was fascinating while reading to go back and watch some of the movies, like "Three Little Pigs" and "Snow White" (which I never really liked before) and compare the styles, knowing what went into them and what made them great. And visiting Disneyland after reading the book makes you look at the place differently and notice more details. But I was also surprised to learn that the genius behind "the happiest place on earth" usually wasn't a very happy man himself. Mr. Gabler describes Walt's constant need to create "control" in his surroundings that drove his efforts at perfection. Animation, his trains, and Disneyland each in turn gave him an escape from reality into an environment where he had near-total control.

Books about Walt Disney either paint him as a saint or an evil tyrant, and I guess he could be both depending on the perspective. Gabler is careful to point out where the "legends" were embellished, and that "Walt Disney" became more of a brand than a man, but I thought he portrayed him fairly and honestly. Gabler tells Disney's faults, ego, and the complaints many of his employees had, but also why he did what he did and what motivated him. It sometimes bogs down in too much detail about finances, but it not only shows why he was so culturally influential but also that he was as human as all of us.

(This review is modified from my 5/26/12 blog review at bookworm-dad.blogspot.com) ( )
  J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
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Once again, for my beloved daughters, Laurel and Tänne, who make all things worthwile, and for all those who have ever wished upon a star
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"Seven years in the making and meticulously researched - Gabler is the first writer to be given complete access to the Disney archives - this is the full story of a man whose work left an ineradicable brand on our culture but whose life has largely been enshrouded in myth." "Gabler shows us the young Walt Disney breaking free of a heartland childhood of discipline and deprivation and making his way to Hollywood. We see the visionary, whose desire for escape honed an innate sense of what people wanted to see on the screen and, when combined with iron determination and obsessive perfectionism, led him to the reinvention of animation. It was Disney, first with Mickey Mouse and then with his feature films - most notably Snow White, Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo, and Bambi - who transformed animation from a novelty based on movement to an art form that presented an illusion of life." "We see him reimagine the amusement park with Disneyland, prompting critics to coin the word Disneyfication to describe the process by which reality can be modified to fit one's personal desires. At the same time, he provided a new way to connect with American history through his live-action films and purveyed a view of the country so coherent that even today one can speak meaningfully of "Walt Disney's America." We see how the True-Life Adventure nature documentaries he produced helped create the environmental movement by sensitizing the general public to issues of conservation. And we see how he reshaped the entertainment industry by building a synergistic empire that combined film, television, theme parks, music, book publishing, and merchandise in a way that was unprecedented and was later widely imitated." "Gabler also reveals a wounded, lonely, and often disappointed man, who, despite worldwide success, was plagued with financial problems much of his life, suffered a nervous breakdown, and at times retreated into pitiable seclusion in his workshop making model trains. Gabler explores accusations that Disney was a red-baiter, an anti-Semite, an embittered alcoholic. But whatever the characterizations of Disney's personal life, he appealed to the nation by demonstrating the power of wish fulfillment and the triumph of the American imagination. Walt Disney showed how one could impose one's will on the world."--BOOK JACKET.

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