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Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural…
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Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution (original 1997; edição 2018)

por Ji-li Jiang (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,950526,457 (3.92)14
Publishers Weekly Best Book * ALA Best Book for Young Adults * ALA Notable Children's Book * ALA Booklist Editors' Choice In the tradition of The Diary of Anne Frank and I Am Malala, this is the incredible true story of one girl's courage and determination during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century. This edition includes a detailed glossary, pronunciation guide, discussion questions, and a Q&A with the author. It's 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, popularity, and a bright future in Communist China. But it's also the year that China's leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution--and Ji-li's world begins to fall apart. Over the next few years, people who were once her friends and neighbors turn on her and her family, forcing them to live in constant terror of arrest. And when Ji-li's father is finally imprisoned, she faces the most difficult dilemma of her life. Written in an accessible and engaging style, this page-turning, honest, and deeply personal autobiography will appeal to readers of all ages.… (mais)
Membro:estooksb
Título:Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution
Autores:Ji-li Jiang (Autor)
Informação:HarperTeen (2018), Edition: Reprint, 320 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Pormenores da obra

Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution por Ji-li Jiang (1997)

  1. 10
    A Daughter of Han: The Autobiography of a Chinese Working Woman por Ida Pruitt (cammykitty)
    cammykitty: This predates the Cultural Revolution and is not suitable for young adult readers as Red Scarf Girl is, but it does give a great look at the experiences that were part of the "Four Olds" that the revolution wanted to destroy.
  2. 00
    God Is Red: The Secret Story of How Christianity Survived and Flourished in Communist China por Liao Yiwu (kathleen.morrow)
  3. 00
    Chinese Cinderella: The True Story of an Unwanted Daughter por Adeline Yen Mah (meggyweg)
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This biography is by Ji Li Jiang and chronicles her life in China during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s-70s. The forward notes that had Chairman Mao not started the Cultural Revolution, he may have been remembered more favorably in history. An interesting thought since at first Ji Li supports Mao as a great leader. This book shows life during the Cultural Revolution from the perspective of a twelve year old girl. Readers will see themselves in Ji Li as she struggles to balance her personal experiences with what her society teaches is correct. This book was awarded a Notable Children's Trade Book Award.
  DaynaVH | Jul 21, 2021 |
An absolute must read. A candid account of a child who lived through the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Never say it can't happen here... it can. ( )
  MusicforMovies | Jul 20, 2021 |
Excellent Memoir of a Turbulent Time

"Red Scarf Girl" by Jiang Ji-Li covers the two years of Jiang's life in which the Cultural Revolution most effects her family. It is an intense and emotional book. The target audience is middle-school and junior high students but the book can be read quickly by adult readers.

As the book opens, Jiang is a wide-eyed member of the Red Guard, promising to uphold Mao's ideas of communism. She is a model student in Shanghai with expectations of going to an elite junior high. Quickly, however, the Cultural Revolution turns on her own family and her family falls victim.

The book is not a comprehensive history of the Cultural Revolution. It is a simple, jarring account of one girl's tragic experience. We do not learn about the political struggles in Beijing, cow sheds, or "sent down youth," but there are insights into work units and their factions, house raids, and daily life. ( )
  mvblair | Aug 8, 2020 |
It was amazing, well-written, and touching. I'm really glad to have read it. ( )
  barajash29 | Jan 22, 2020 |
This was a difficult book. The author recounts her experiences as a 12–14-year old during the Cultural Revolution in China. She tells the story in a very matter-of-fact way. I'm sure things were different in different places, but my recollections of the time is that things sounded pretty horrible, and, of course, I wasn't even there. But, this helps confirm my recollections.

We did, however, have some sense of the cultural revolution even here in the U.S. We had a group of nitwits running around with Mao's little red book. I know their hearts were in the right place, but they were clearly not very bright. They thought that if they brought down "the system", everyone would suddenly become moral and holy and get along like lions with lambs. Likely those nitwits have turned into libertarians now: same kind of naive stupidity. [But I digress....sorry].

I read this, in part, because the parents of my soon-to-be, son-in-law, Victor, were swept up in the Cultural Revolution. They had been teachers who were sent into the country side to be agricultural workers for ten years (nope! they were teachers in the countryside). This process was to reeducate them in some way. I'm not sure how, and Victor wasn't much interested in telling me more. Unlike Jiang Ji-li, the author, who still espouses a strong affection for the country of her birth, our Victor's parents aren't much interested in going back, and Victor himself has zero interest in ever visiting the country of his parents' birth. [According to Victor's father, the greatest horror was in having no sense that a decent future was possible, no idea what might happen next. Fortunately, they did have a future: after 10 or so years, they came here and prospered.]

I dunno, there's a lesson in all this. When a charismatic leader, who is also a supreme narcissist with little interest in effective governance, takes control of things, bad things are bound to ensue. And so they did; and so they always have, and so, I fear, they will again.
( )
  lgpiper | Jun 21, 2019 |
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Publishers Weekly Best Book * ALA Best Book for Young Adults * ALA Notable Children's Book * ALA Booklist Editors' Choice In the tradition of The Diary of Anne Frank and I Am Malala, this is the incredible true story of one girl's courage and determination during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century. This edition includes a detailed glossary, pronunciation guide, discussion questions, and a Q&A with the author. It's 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, popularity, and a bright future in Communist China. But it's also the year that China's leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution--and Ji-li's world begins to fall apart. Over the next few years, people who were once her friends and neighbors turn on her and her family, forcing them to live in constant terror of arrest. And when Ji-li's father is finally imprisoned, she faces the most difficult dilemma of her life. Written in an accessible and engaging style, this page-turning, honest, and deeply personal autobiography will appeal to readers of all ages.

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