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Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland

por Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus

Outros autores: Mary Jordan, Kevin Sullivan

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2771573,649 (4.33)5
On May 6, 2013, Amanda Berry made headlines around the world when she fled a Cleveland home and called 911, saying: "Help me, I'm Amanda Berry... I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for ten years." A horrifying story rapidly unfolded. Ariel Castro, a local school bus driver, had separately lured Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight to his home, where he kept them chained. In the decade that followed, the three were raped, psychologically abused, and threatened with death. Berry had a daughter -- Jocelyn -- by their captor. Drawing upon their recollections and the diary kept by Amanda Berry, Berry and Gina DeJesus describe a tale of unimaginable torment. Reporters Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan interweave the events within Castro's house with original reporting on efforts to find the missing girls. The full story behind the headlines -- including details never previously released on Castro's life and motivations -- Hope is a harrowing yet inspiring chronicle of two women whose courage, ingenuity, and resourcefulness ultimately delivered them back to their lives and families.… (mais)
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In the spring of 2003, 17 year old Amanda Berry, walking home from work, was lured into a van by the father of a schoolmate. She was then taken to his house (still believing he was taking her to see her friend), where she was grabbed, brutally raped, and then chained up in the basement. She, and later Gina DeJesus, would remain in this house until 2013. Also there was Michelle Knight, who decided to tell her story on her own, so she is largely absent from these pages.

For ten long years, they were held inside without even a window to look out of. They were chained up, repeatedly raped, not fed nearly enough, terrified the whole time. Amanda had a baby girl while captive. Her rapist, Ariel Castro, was very proud to be a father and doted on the baby- while still keeping Amanda chained up. Amanda tried to raise the little girl with some sense of normalcy, teaching her to read, write, and do arithmetic. Castro enjoyed allowing the girls to watch the TV news when their families were on, begging for the return of their loved ones- an extra little bit of sadism.

The story is nothing short of horrifying. Castro and his treatment of the young women was viscerally revolting to me. The families and the police searched for them for years without finding anything. They despaired that they would never be found, never get out. Castro lied to each of them, telling them how he liked each one better than the others and that the other girls were saying bad things about them, driving a wedge between them so they could only look to him and not have warm feelings for the others. Now, Amanda and Gina are best friends- who else could understand what they have been through?-and have the support of their families again. I’m amazed at how well they have settled back into normal lives. They are very strong people to have survived as they did- I know I could never have survived in their situation.

The book alternates points of view, not just of the two girls, but also third person sections that show what their families, the police, and Castro himself were doing at the time. Amanda kept a diary of sorts; she intended to remember every detail and wrote in notebooks Castro bought her; when she filled those, she wrote on pizza boxes, receipts, and any other piece of paper she could find. The book was riveting; like a bad auto accident, I wanted to look away but couldn’t. Five stars, but very, very hard to read. ( )
  lauriebrown54 | Sep 29, 2019 |
This is the true story of the 3 teenage girls abducted in Cleveland, Ohio in the early 2000s by Ariel Castro. Their escape captivated the nation, but they didn't speak much publicly about what they endured during their captivation. This story is written in their own words (by 2 of the 3 survivors), aided by the diary kept by Amanda Berry during the 10 years she was held prisoner. The story is rounded out by reporters who lend details about what was happening in their community during this time. The story is fascinating in its details, especially in the coincidences and tiny, seemingly insignificant decisions that led to the abductions, and in the sheer volume of interactions that their captor had with their friends and family members while the women were missing.

The book is easy to read. Each short chapter is headed by a date. It is both heartbreaking and voyeuristic without being too graphic. And the title "hope" is fitting because so many of the people involved maintained hope in the face of adversity. ( )
  originalslicey | Jan 23, 2019 |
The journalists’ portions of this book: well-researched, factually reported breakdown of the crime and of who Ariel Castro was.
Gina and Amanda’s portions of this book: honest sharing interlaced with unnecessary and heavy doses of We Don’t Like Michelle Knight

Seriously. There were parts of this book where it seemed the message was how much they both dislike Michelle, today, rather than what happened to them, then.
I am carefully separating this present pettiness from the mind games Castro would play with the three girls; I completely understand the difference. But it’s so blatant that, in the conclusion, you learn that Amanda and Gina go to the White House for an event honoring the missing, and Michelle is excluded. If I’d been through ten years of hell, and someone else had suffered in that hell *even longer*, it would not matter to me how I felt about her as a person. I would make completely sure she was by my side at that White House event because she is also a survivor.

Let me put it this way: I am an avid reader of true crime, and I was glad and relieved when this book ended. ( )
1 vote carlahaunted | Jan 8, 2019 |
This is a hard book to read because it's emotional. I can't speak for outside the Cleveland, OH area, but in this area, it was big news. So at the beginning of the book, you already know that Amanda and Gina are going to be kidnapped and held for 10 years. You might find yourself, like me, wanting to warn them to not get in the van--to not give him the cell phone when he asks to see it--to not go into the house. Even though you know it's futile because it's already happened. For awhile, the only thing that kept me reading was the knowledge that the ending is a good one.

The middle part is sad (detailing what he did and said to them and what he put them through), but it was interesting to see what sustained them and their hope during the decade that they were held captive--and how things changed after the arrival of Jocelyn Jade Berry. I am not sure what made Ariel Castro leave the house that day without taking his usual precautions--I am glad he did and glad that Amanda was able to escape and summon help for Gina and Michelle--but part of me wonders if he didn't do it to bring an end to it in his time rather than waiting for Jocelyn to let something slip to the wrong person when he had her out with him.

I am glad both Gina and Amanda seemed to be moving on with their lives post-Castro. I heard that Amanda was doing segments on missing children on a local TV station, which is a good thing. In fact, just today I heard about a 56 year old woman who is missing and it is suspected that her boyfriend is holding her against her will. Very scary world that we live in. ( )
  JenniferRobb | Jul 19, 2017 |
I remember hearing about this case but never really paid attention to it. I didn't realize how big it was until years later, so when I saw this I snatched it up. I have a weird fascination with stories like this.

I can't believe what I read, it's all so crazy. I'm impressed by their determination to survive. I couldn't imagine I'd make it all. I'm glad they are living happy normal lives now.

Fuck that guy. He was Satan's taint.
( )
  Shahnareads | Jun 21, 2017 |
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DeJesus, Ginaautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Jordan, Maryautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Sullivan, Kevinautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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On May 6, 2013, Amanda Berry made headlines around the world when she fled a Cleveland home and called 911, saying: "Help me, I'm Amanda Berry... I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for ten years." A horrifying story rapidly unfolded. Ariel Castro, a local school bus driver, had separately lured Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight to his home, where he kept them chained. In the decade that followed, the three were raped, psychologically abused, and threatened with death. Berry had a daughter -- Jocelyn -- by their captor. Drawing upon their recollections and the diary kept by Amanda Berry, Berry and Gina DeJesus describe a tale of unimaginable torment. Reporters Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan interweave the events within Castro's house with original reporting on efforts to find the missing girls. The full story behind the headlines -- including details never previously released on Castro's life and motivations -- Hope is a harrowing yet inspiring chronicle of two women whose courage, ingenuity, and resourcefulness ultimately delivered them back to their lives and families.

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