Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Ex Machina, Tome 4 : La guerre en marche por…
A carregar...

Ex Machina, Tome 4 : La guerre en marche (edição 2008)

por Brian-K Vaughan, Tony Harris, Chris Sprouse, Brian-K Vaughan (Auteur), Tony Harris (Auteur)1 mais, Chris Sprouse (Auteur)

Séries: Ex Machina (17-20, Special 1-2)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
458640,387 (3.91)4
Mitchell Hundred has faced countless challenges in his time as mayor of New York City, but nothing could have prepared him for America's coming war in Iraq. As a massive peace protest fills the streets of Manhattan, the mayor must choose between the liberty of his constituents and the safety of his city.… (mais)
Membro:yann67
Título:Ex Machina, Tome 4 : La guerre en marche
Autores:Brian-K Vaughan
Outros autores:Tony Harris, Chris Sprouse, Brian-K Vaughan (Auteur), Tony Harris (Auteur), Chris Sprouse (Auteur)
Informação:Panini comics (2008), Broché
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Ex Machina: March to War por Brian K. Vaughan

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 4 menções

Mostrando 5 de 5
Ex Machina: March to War returns to the series’ greatest strengths, namely exploring real-world politics through a comic lens. March to War takes place during the months before the 2003 American invasion of Iraq, centered on Mayor Hundred’s decision to allow a controversial anti-war protest in New York City. The later issues return to more conventional superhero affair, as The Great Machine grapples with someone who can communicate with animals just as he can with machinery.

Overall, the politics were extremely well-depicted, even if I was occasionally surprised at the direction they took. In the aftermath of a ricin attack in NYC, Mayor Hundred authorizes warrant-less searches of commuter bags on the MTA, while also engages in his own vigilantism to track down the terrorist responsible for the attack. At first, I was expecting a kind of sideways commentary on the surveillance overreaches of the post 9/11-era. After all, whenever the superhero breaks the rules to nab a suspect, we pretty much always cheer for them, and Ex Machina seemed like it was willing to subvert the trope. But… it never entirely happened. The story seems somewhat agnostic as to whether or not systematic bag searches are worth the cost – though a few characters raise points in opposition. I was also very surprised that the terrorist mastermind turned out to be “Sammir Hallouda” an atheist scientist who nevertheless wanted to ‘finish the job’ started on 9/11. I genuinely have no idea what Vaughan was going for there. I think it was supposed to remind Mayor Hundred that not everything is about him, that mundane threats are more pervasive than the supervillains of comic fantasy. But an American, technically-competent Islamic bioterrorist is only vaguely less fantastical, more in keeping with the GWB-era rhetoric that there are al-Qaeda criminal masterminds who are too dangerous to handle judicially.

The odd saga of the Sammir Hallouda arc notwithstanding, Ex Machina continues good storytelling and worldbuilding. There’s some Newsroom-esque ruminations on the validity of “ambush” questions (in this case: would an opponent of the death penalty still support executing Osama bin Laden?), and the animal-controlling villain was a perfectly functional antagonist. ( )
  pvoberstein | Dec 15, 2020 |
Having read and loved Brian K. Vaughn’s Y the Last Man series years ago, I was excited to finally get around to Ex Machina. Hoping for the same attention to character and detailed US cultural atmosphere as the dystopian series, Mitchell Hundred and his alter ego The Great Machine did not disappoint. Combining the worlds of preternatural hero and mundane civil governing may not strike one as a recipe for riveting storytelling, but Vaughn delivers a tale that is more human than super.

His strength lies (particularly in the early volumes of the series) in his almost painfully real characters. Reluctant superhero turned mayor of New York City Mitchell Hundred is neither unbelievably altruistic nor abusive of his powers. His love for New York reigns above all else, and there’s a fierce loyalty to his hometown to which many will relate. Oddly for me, he is genuine is such a way as to drain tension from the story. I had no anxiety about where the series was headed, and I even liked the characters I didn’t like- if that makes any sense. I guess I should say that Vaughn outlines motivations of his characters so clearly that even when I’m against the character’s actions, I can’t fault him/her for following that course.

At the same time, the series serves as an interesting snapshot of US political and cultural trends in the early 21st century, exploring everything from taxpayer-funded birth control to political protests to the legalization of marijuana. Most striking perhaps for our nation in 2015 is Hundred officiating a marriage of two men in New York’s city hall. This story arc also showcases Vaughn’s awareness of nuance and his skill in humanizing what some consider more esoteric political battles. In this case, one of the grooms is a firefighter who was a first responder at Ground Zero. Indeed, the terror attacks of September 11th shadow the entire series, and Vaughn makes an honest attempt to explore the reality of New York City in the wake of tragedy.

Unfortunately, the series begins to lose its detail and complexity as it wraps up. Characters and situations grow ever more one-dimensional, and what made the story feel so real in the midst of the incredible disappears under a layer of cynicism and bitterness. I’m not sure what causes this shift, but it transforms a powerful, poignant narrative into something brutal and primitive.

Overall, this series is a must-read for fans of Vaughn, and if you like superheroes, politics, or New York City, you’ll fall in love as well. ( )
  porcupineracetrack | Aug 15, 2015 |
Summary: In Volume 4, when an anti-war protest is attacked, most people assume that it was the work of terrorists. But as Mayor Hundred struggles to deal with the aftermath of the attack, how far is he willing to compromise the liberty of his citizens to ensure their safety? And what if the attack was not meant to target New Yorkers in general, but the Mayor in particular? And in the second arc, we meet the Great Machine's arch-nemesis, someone who shares similar powers - but who talks to animals, not machines.

Review: Volume 4's main storyline was probably most impressive for how accurately it captured the feeling of early 2003, shortly prior to the US's declaration of war on Iraq. (I was living in a major US city at the time, and although the anti-war protests didn't get attacked insofar as I know, I do remember being sent home from work at least once because of an anthrax scare.) The protests and the panic and the reprisals and the tension between personal freedom and the threat of terrorist invasions are all captured remarkably well, as are the frustrations of those in charge who are trying to balance everything as they deal with a city on the edge. The second arc was a little less successful; because of the way this series jumps around in the timeline, it's difficult placing events in context, but when an arc is clearly set before the "present day", it becomes more difficult to regard the bad guy as a serious threat. 4 out of 5 stars.

Recommendation: While this series is not my favorite of Brian K. Vaughan's work, it's making a story that's largely focused on politics interesting, which says quite a bit in its favor. ( )
  fyrefly98 | Nov 3, 2014 |
Surprisingly funny. The artwork is fantastic. There are some gruesome scenes. ( )
  lesmel | Apr 19, 2013 |
Great book. Great character ( )
  andystehr | Sep 21, 2010 |
Mostrando 5 de 5
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em espanhol. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em espanhol. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em espanhol. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em espanhol. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em espanhol. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Mitchell Hundred has faced countless challenges in his time as mayor of New York City, but nothing could have prepared him for America's coming war in Iraq. As a massive peace protest fills the streets of Manhattan, the mayor must choose between the liberty of his constituents and the safety of his city.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.91)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 1
3 30
3.5 13
4 61
4.5 7
5 30

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 157,719,862 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível