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The Hidden Life of Trees What They Feel, How…
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The Hidden Life of Trees What They Feel, How They Communicate-Discoveries… (original 2003; edição 2016)

por Peter Wohlleben, Tim Flannery

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2,191755,398 (4)117
Are trees social beings? Forester and author Peter Wohlleben makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network. He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers. Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.… (mais)
Membro:Krinsekatze
Título:The Hidden Life of Trees What They Feel, How They Communicate-Discoveries from a Secret World
Autores:Peter Wohlleben
Outros autores:Tim Flannery
Informação:La Vergne Greystone Books 2016
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:to-read

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The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate: Discoveries from a Secret World por Peter Wohlleben (2003)

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Inglês (66)  Alemão (4)  Holandês (2)  Francês (1)  Húngaro (1)  Dinamarquês (1)  Todas as línguas (75)
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If a tree falls in the forest, Peter Wohlleben seems to suggest, listen for a woodland wake. This woodsman spares no effort to give that tree human qualities. It did't just make its presence felt, it lived a long life of service. Its patterns were locked not in the genes but in memory, and likely nursing a grudge or two. Do trees really look out for each other? I'm going with nature over nurture: It's enough to say trees do not thrive for long on their own. The mystery is not how trees learn this but why humans don't. The interdependence of the forest ecosystem is this book's lush understory. The thick canopy of anthropomorphism just throws shade.
  rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
nonfiction (forestry, biology, ecosystems). This was very like watching David Attenborough in "Life of Plants"--fascinating, and written in layman's language (though I would have liked to see a bit more science in it). Scientific studies are cited in the endnotes. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Never will I see trees the same. They are social creatures, communicating through their roots, feeding their sick neighbors, protecting their saplings, and agreeing not to infringe on one another's sun access. They can outlive humans by a hundred lifetimes.
Anyone who wants to see beyond the human-centric world should read this book. ( )
  Norinski | Apr 12, 2021 |
A much needed book that expands our perception of the plants we live with. Plants are far more sophisticated than we like to think and I'm betting they will survive us in the long game. ( )
  bcoynedavies | Mar 17, 2021 |
Fascinating. I also love Wohlleben's clear enthusiasm for the subject. Sometimes this seems to get the better of him, however, so I'm not sure that he is always completely credible. (Ideally, there would also be more discussion of North American trees.)

> without bark the tree cannot transport sugar from its leaves to its roots. As the roots starve, they shut down their pumping mechanisms, and because water no longer flows through the trunk up to the crown, the whole tree dries out. However, many of the trees I girdled continued to grow with more or less vigor. I know now that this was only possible with the help of intact neighboring trees. Thanks to the underground network, neighbors took over the disrupted task of provisioning the roots and thus made it possible for their buddies to survive.

> An easy way to estimate the age of a young beech tree is to count the small nodes on its branches. These nodes are tiny swellings that look like a bunch of fine wrinkles. They form every year underneath the buds, and when these grow the following spring and the branch gets longer, the nodes remain behind. Every year, the same thing happens, and so the number of nodes corresponds with the age of the tree. When the branch gets thicker than about a tenth of an inch, the nodes disappear into the expanding bark. When I examined one of my young beech trees, it turned out that a single 8-inch-long twig already had twenty-five of these swellings.

> If Central Europe were such a paradise, the competition would be won almost exclusively by beeches. They know exactly how to exploit abundance, and they suppress competitors by growing up through the crowns of other trees and then covering the losers with their upper branches

> Spruce store essential oils in their needles and bark, which act like antifreeze. And that’s why they don’t need to jettison their green finery but keep it wrapped around their branches in the cold season. As soon as the weather warms up in the spring, they can start photosynthesizing. Not a day is lost, and even if there are only a few weeks in which sugar and wood can be produced, the tree can still grow an inch or two every year.

> Right from the beginning, [the yew] puts considerably more energy into building up its root system than other species of trees. Here, it stashes away nutrients, and if misfortune strikes above ground, it grows right back without missing a beat. This often leads to the formation of multiple trunks, which may merge when the tree reaches an advanced age, giving the tree an untidy appearance. And boy can these trees grow old! Living to be a thousand years old or more, they easily outstrip the closest competition, and over the course of centuries, they increasingly get to bask in the sun whenever an old tree growing above them breathes its last. Despite this, yews grow no more than 65 feet tall.

> alders. At around 100 feet, it’s true they don’t grow as tall as their competitors, but they have no problem growing on unpopular swampy ground. Their secret is a system of air ducts inside their roots. These transport oxygen to the tiniest tips, a bit like divers who are connected to the surface via a breathing tube. In addition, the trees have cork cells in the lower parts of their trunks, which allow air to enter. It is only when the water level remains higher than these breathing holes for an extended period of time that the alders weaken sufficiently for their roots to fall victim to aggressive fungi.

> this mechanism only functions within a few hundred miles of the coast. The farther inland you go, the drier it is, because the clouds get rained out and disappear. When you get about 400 miles from the coast, it is so dry that the first deserts appear. If we depended on just this mechanism for water, life would be possible only in a narrow band around the edge of continents; the interior of land masses would be arid and bleak. So, thank goodness for trees. … Part of every rainfall is intercepted in the canopy and immediately evaporates again. In addition, each summer, trees use up to 8,500 cubic yards of water per square mile, which they release into the air through transpiration. This water vapor creates new clouds that travel farther inland to release their rain. As the cycle continues, water reaches even the most remote areas. This water pump works so well that the downpours in some large areas of the world, such as the Amazon Basin, are almost as heavy thousands of miles inland as they are on the coast.

> the bird cherry. Their leaves contain nectar glands, which secrete the same sweet juice as the flowers. In this case, the nectar is for ants, which spend most of the summer in the trees. And just like people, from time to time these insects crave something heartier than a sugary snack. They get this in the form of caterpillars, and thus they rid the bird cherry of its uninvited guests. But it doesn’t always turn out the way the tree intended. The caterpillars get eaten, but apparently, sometimes the amount of sweet nectar the tree provides doesn’t satisfy the ants and they begin to farm aphids.

> To protect its needles from freezing, a conifer fills them with antifreeze. To ensure it doesn’t lose water to transpiration over the winter, it covers the exterior of its needles with a thick layer of wax. As an extra precaution, the skin on its needles is tough and hard, and the small breathing holes on the underside are buried extra deep.

> As long as the trees are healthy, firs always keep ten, spruce six, and pines three years’ worth of needles, as you can tell by taking a look at the annual growth intervals on their branches. Pines especially, which shed about a quarter of their green needles, can look somewhat sparse in winter.

> Thanks to climate change, fall temperatures are remaining high for longer and longer, and the gamble of holding on to leaves is being drawn out until November. All the while, fall storms are beginning as punctually as ever in October, and so the risk of getting blown over while still in full leaf rises

> Walnuts have compounds in their leaves that deal so effectively with insects that garden lovers are often advised to put a bench under a canopy of walnuts if they want a comfortable place to relax in the garden, because this is where they will have the least chance of being bitten by mosquitoes. The phytoncides in conifers are particularly pungent, and they are the origin of that heady forest scent that is especially intense on hot summer days. ( )
  breic | Feb 4, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 75 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Wohlleben's anecdotes are engaging, but sadly his book contains only a few.
adicionada por MarthaJeanne | editarNew Scientist, Sandrine Ceurstemont (Oct 29, 2016)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (43 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Peter Wohllebenautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Billinghurst, JaneTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Flannery, TimPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kytömäki, AnniPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Simard, Dr. SuzannePosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tresca, CorinneTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Alle Natur, alles Wachsen, aller Friede, alles Gedeihen und Schöne in der Welt beruht auf Geduld, braucht Zeit, braucht Stille, braucht Vertrauen. (Hermann Hesse)
The Earth has its music for those who listen.
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Years ago, I stumbled across a patch of strange-looking mossy stones in one of the preserves of old beech trees that grows in the forest I manage.
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Are trees social beings? Forester and author Peter Wohlleben makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network. He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers. Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.

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