Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

A Sudden Country

por Karen Fisher

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3041166,287 (3.79)12
A vivid and revelatory novel based on actual events of the 1847 Oregon migration, A Sudden Country follows two characters of remarkable complexity and strength in a journey of survival and redemption. James MacLaren, once a resourceful and ambitious Hudson's Bay Company trader, has renounced his aspirations for a quiet family life in the Bitterroot wilderness. Yet his life is overturned in the winter of 1846, when his Nez Perce wife deserts him and his children die of smallpox. In the grip of a profound sorrow, MacLaren, whose home once spanned a continent, sets out to find his wife. But an act of secret vengeance changes his course, introducing him to a different wife and mother: Lucy Mitchell, journeying westward with her family. Lucy, a remarried widow, careful mother, and reluctant emigrant, is drawn at once to the self-possessed MacLaren. Convinced that he is the key to her family's safe passage, she persuades her husband to employ him. As their hidden stories and obsessions unfold, and pasts and cultures collide, both Lucy and MacLaren must confront the people they have truly been, are, and may become. Alive with incident and insight, presenting with rare scope and intimacy the complex relations among nineteenth-century traders, immigrants, and Native Americans, A Sudden Country is, above all, a heroic and unforgettable story of love and loss, sacrifice and understanding.… (mais)
  1. 00
    Angle of Repose por Wallace Stegner (amelielyle)
    amelielyle: Both are novels of the American West. Both are the story of intelligent women constrained by the role of 19th century wife and mother. Part of the pathos of each story is the dissolution of those marriages. Lyrical and image-provoking writing style.
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 12 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
For me, the definition of truly great fiction is a work that makes you see something you thought you knew and understood as if you were really seeing and understanding it for the first time. And, based on that criterion, this is a fabulous, unforgettable novel.

Things that this book is NOT …
• It is not an easy read.
• It is NOT a “cowboy romance.”
• It is not a neatly packaged, respectfully sanitized tale of plucky pioneers.
• It is not “Madame Bovary on the Oregon Trail” …

What it IS, is a fantastic story. Complicated, messy. Disturbing even: Fisher uses a set-up that could, in lesser hands, have been a horrible cliché (cowboy romance, plucky pioneers, even low-budget Madame Bovary) and turns it, instead, into a fabulously written and structured story about the dynamics between complicated people, in a difficult and dangerous situation, and the stories – the lies – that we tell ourselves in order to survive. The versions of those lies that we pass down, in the hope that someone, in a far distant future that we can scarcely imagine, will remember us, and understand us and our sorry little struggles.

A story about stories and how, sometimes, we make them come true.

It is not, as I said an easy read. Fisher has adopted a style that is choppy and poetic, archaic and sometimes shockingly and anachronistically modern, and you have to pay attention, or you can miss minor little things like what the heck is actually happening … It took me a while to get into it and it actually helped that, after reading about 70-odd pages, I had to take an enforced break. When I returned to it, I realized that I could barely remember a thing about the who, what where, etc, and I decided to start again. While I was on hiatus, my brain must have been quietly constructing an algorithm for dealing with Fisher’s prose, because I found that I was immediately immersed in the intertwined stories of James McLaren, tragedy-stricken former trapper with the Hudson Bay Company, grieving father and (possibly) wronged husband, and Lucy Mitchell, one of a family of American Midwesterners on the Oregon Trail -- devoted mother, grieving widow, half-hearted wife, and reluctant pioneer. Fisher’s twisty, complicated prose suddenly seemed like the most effective way – the only way possible of truthfully rendering the thoughts and dialogue of characters who otherwise might seem as distant and alien to me as Martians.

The best analogy I can think of is the style of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall, which manages simultaneously to convey that these are people who are very much not like us in their attitudes and assumptions, while at the same time being just like us, in everything that really matters, the things that make us all human. That, in my opinion, is high praise – and Fisher richly deserves it.

Fisher developed her novel from a very brief account (it hardly rates the word “journal”) of her ancestors’ 1847 journey from Iowa to Portland, Oregon, written by her teenage great-great grandmother. This is incorporated into the narrative, with some other original family documents, at the end of the novel. What I find fascinating is that Fisher’s style, which seems at first sight so “edgy” and modern, has been drawn directly from the slightly stiff, slightly formal and very innocent style of her child ancestor’s barebones account. Emma Rose Ross manages to render a punishing journey of over a year’s duration, which almost resulted in the deaths of herself, her siblings and parents, into two pages that skate over the dramatic episodes, rattle off a list of the names of the families on the trail with them (wonderful, evocative names – “ … Littlejohn … Peabo … Lamphere … Koonse …”), and focuses instead on the tiny details, the magical and frightening moments that a child would notice and remember, the bright memories and the tragic ones all jumbled together. ( On July Fourth, some of the men took pails to a snow field & brought snow to us. We took a cut-off stretch and went no water all day or night and there our nice mare perished and a cow of Mr. Apperson’s … )

Fisher has taken this intriguing, and frustrating account – and spun it into pure gold. The episodes her child-ancestor describes are reworked and reimagined to accommodate the wild card that Fisher has introduced into the story of Emma Rose and her family – James McLaren, who becomes part of their journey like a spirit (malign? Or noble?) of the new land they are travelling through and making their new home.

This is highly recommended, and I can’t wait to read it again one day. ( )
  maura853 | Jul 11, 2021 |
The story of a family in a wagon train following the Oregon Trail. Realistic picture of life on a moving frontier. The title comes from the sudden events, usually violent, caused by nature and humans, that occurred on the trail. Well written with clear images of the land and the characters. The final note is such a surprise it will make you page back through the book if not reread it. If you are interested in the history of this period this book will add some humanity to the history. ( )
  Richj | Jul 13, 2016 |
A memorable book about one family's experiences travelling by wagon from Pennsylvania to Oregon in 1850. This novel is based on actual historical records from the author's ancestors, and I loved Karen Fisher's dreamlike writing style. More realistic than romantic, this novel has wonderful characters and true descriptions of the extremely difficult experiences on the road and the job of just surviving such a sojourn. One of the most wrenching opening scenes I've read in a longtime drew me in immediately to this rich story. ( )
  grigoro | Nov 29, 2009 |
This book takes you along with the Mitchell family as they move from Pennsylvania to Oregon in a covered wagon as part of the U.S. migration West. Fisher takes you through the decisions and relationships encountered - the people they meet, the things they take along and eventually leave behind. Survival in everyday life where what was important before the Trail becomes trivial and decadent. Characterized as a love story, but I didn't see it that way. Was a little surprised at the ending, but shouldn't have been. More realistic than romantic, which is prefered I think with this sort of story. ( )
  melissavenable | Jul 27, 2009 |
The author, in this case, takes an event rich with possibility (the Oregon trail migration) and creates a novel which was borderline unreadable as a result of her attempt to create a "literary masterpiece". Using vocabulary which I certainly recognize, she crafts it into a language with which I am not familiar. It should be pointed out that I am quite educated, a voracious reader and an accomplished writer.

I compare and contrast this work unfavorably with the brilliantly written Cold Mountain. All of the misgivings which I felt in undertaking that novel (luckily not realized) were confirmed in A Sudden Country. I could not help but feel that Charles Frazier would have taken the same story line and characters and crafted a far superior product. ( )
  santhony | Sep 25, 2008 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
He carried his girl tied to his front, the trapsack on his back, the rifle balanced like a yoke along his shoulders.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
How young we all begin, it seemed. How brave and full of certainty. How terrible it would be to know: not only what we must become, but who we really are.
There's something wrong in all of us. People are like stones. Weak and strong, but none without a fault. Life gets in and cleaves us, every one. Slow like ice. Quick like fire. Have you not heard stone break?
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

A vivid and revelatory novel based on actual events of the 1847 Oregon migration, A Sudden Country follows two characters of remarkable complexity and strength in a journey of survival and redemption. James MacLaren, once a resourceful and ambitious Hudson's Bay Company trader, has renounced his aspirations for a quiet family life in the Bitterroot wilderness. Yet his life is overturned in the winter of 1846, when his Nez Perce wife deserts him and his children die of smallpox. In the grip of a profound sorrow, MacLaren, whose home once spanned a continent, sets out to find his wife. But an act of secret vengeance changes his course, introducing him to a different wife and mother: Lucy Mitchell, journeying westward with her family. Lucy, a remarried widow, careful mother, and reluctant emigrant, is drawn at once to the self-possessed MacLaren. Convinced that he is the key to her family's safe passage, she persuades her husband to employ him. As their hidden stories and obsessions unfold, and pasts and cultures collide, both Lucy and MacLaren must confront the people they have truly been, are, and may become. Alive with incident and insight, presenting with rare scope and intimacy the complex relations among nineteenth-century traders, immigrants, and Native Americans, A Sudden Country is, above all, a heroic and unforgettable story of love and loss, sacrifice and understanding.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.79)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 5
2.5 1
3 11
3.5 3
4 30
4.5 3
5 16

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 160,419,469 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível