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UN AMOR QUE DESTRUYE CIUDADES por Eileen…
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UN AMOR QUE DESTRUYE CIUDADES (edição 1943)

por Eileen Chang

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5081136,441 (3.75)34
Eileen Chang is one of the great writers of twentieth-century China, where she enjoys a passionate following both on the mainland and in Taiwan. At the heart of Chang's achievement is her short fiction - tales of love, longing, and the shifting and endlessly treacherous shoals of family life. Written when she was still in her twenties, these extraordinary stories combine an unsettled, probing, utterly contemporary sensibility, keenly alert to sexual politics and psychological ambiguity, with an intense lyricism that echoes the classics of Chinese literature. Love in a Fallen City, the first collection in English of this dazzling body of work, introduces readers to the stark and glamorous vision of a modern master.… (mais)
Membro:Vladymina
Título:UN AMOR QUE DESTRUYE CIUDADES
Autores:Eileen Chang
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Etiquetas:Libros de Asteroide

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Love in a Fallen City por Eileen Chang

  1. 10
    The Remains of the Day por Kazuo Ishiguro (electronicmemory)
    electronicmemory: Fiction set in the first half of the 20th Century under the shadow of WWII, with characters tormented by things both done and undone.
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If I had to class this story collection somewhere, it’d be domestic fiction. The setting for several of these stories is a traditional family house in early 20thC Shanghai (and sometimes Hong Kong), shared by brothers and their wives, with assorted children, servants and slaves. The top couple is either the Patriarch and Matriarch or the eldest brother and his wife, and they rule over a strict downward hierarchy. Deviations from that setting are presented as just that: deviations from the norm.

The foreground of these stories tends to be the inner family life and how the various couples and generations jostle under the same roof, depicted almost as political factions vying for influence. Most of the focus lies on the women in the household -- the wives, adopted daughters, the slaves.

In the background there’s always several tensions: between the old Chinese ways and the new Western-style ways, between the fast-changing morals of the city and the stolid countryside, between societal duties and a longing (articulated or otherwise) for more female self-determination.

Domestic fiction usually isn’t my cup of tea, and while the social machinations held my interest, they didn’t grip me: the perspective was a tad too impersonal. Believe me, these are good stories; I’m glad I read them. But I don’t think I’ll be reading it again. ( )
  Petroglyph | Dec 13, 2018 |
I wanted to read this because it appeared on the Powell's list of 25 books to read before you die which also includes several of my favourite books.

This is a collection of stories set in Hong Kong and Shanghai in the 30s and 40s. It is rich in local colour and period detail, but I found it a little difficult to warm to, perhaps because the culture Chang describes seems very alien to a modern western eye. ( )
  bodachliath | Sep 14, 2018 |
I put this book on my Paperbackswap wishlist ages ago (Probably from an ad in the New York Review of Books). I received it just before my train trip to Virginia, and it seemed like a good travel book, so I brought it along and ended up reading the whole thing on the outbound train. I was right -- it was a good travel book. A collection of short stories taking place in pre-WWII China & Hong Kong, it seemed a backward trip in time, as they were arranged with the most modern storyline first, each following story seeming to progress more into traditional families and characters, though I would guess all took place within a decade or two of each other in time. Although occasionally the narrators were male, the sum effect was a grim picture of the few options open to women in the social roles at the time. One notable exception was the story of a male college student, trapped between the contradictions of his high social class, his shame at his parents' opium addiction, and the abuse suffered at the hands of his father. But even this misery was the result of his mother's entrapment in a loveless marriage, and his tumultuous feelings had disastrous consequences for a female classmate, so perhaps it was the exception that proves the rule. Masterfully written and stereotype-defying, it would be a worthy read for any lover of literature. ( )
  greeniezona | Dec 6, 2017 |
This is a collection of short works of fiction, ranging from 15 to 70 pages in length. The setting is the China of Chang’s youth and young adulthood, 1930-1945. The connecting thread is that they all deal with love – enduring, passionate, unrequited – and longing, and pit the traditional values of Chinese culture (honoring family, filial devotion) against the increasing influence from the West to “modernize.” The stories are fraught with sexual tension, moral ambiguity, and pangs of conscience. While they are distinctly Chinese stories, they are universal in their themes.

I particularly liked the title story, set in Shanghai and Hong Kong just before (and during) the Japanese attack in 1941, and Red Rose, White Rose, contrasting one man’s divided loyalties between his “spotless wife” (white rose) and his “passionate mistress” (red rose).

Chang is one of the most well-known and celebrated authors in modern China. Born in 1920 to an aristocratic family in Shanghai she studied literature at the Univ of Hong Kong until 1941, when the Japanese attack on that city forced her to return to Shanghai. Eventually she immigrated to the United States in 1952, where she held various posts as writer-in-residence. In 1969 she obtained a more permanent position as a researcher at Berkeley. Despite a resurgence of interest in her work beginning in the 1970s in Taiwan and Hong Kong (and eventually moving to mainland China), she became ever more reclusive. She was found dead in her apartment in 1995.

The edition I read is translated by Karen S Kingsbury and published by New York Review Books. ( )
  BookConcierge | Jan 13, 2016 |
Although Chang carried on writing long after her move to the US, it's these cynical, pessimistic love stories from the thirties and early forties that she's best known for. The combination of the narrator's unromantic view of human nature with languid tropical backgrounds in the prosperous suburbs of Shanghai and Hong Kong makes you think of Somerset Maugham, but Chang complicates that mix further by bringing in her own experience of growing up in an upper-class Chinese family torn between extreme conservatism and the fashion for adopting Western styles of behaviour, dress and ethics. Each of the stories in this collection takes characters exposed to these forces in different combinations and ratios, and we get to see young people making a mess of their lives (and others) irrespective of whether it's in pursuit of money, love, pleasure, or career. Beautifully done, and there's always a strong sense that the European cocktail-cabinet culture is jut as doomed as the lifestyle of the wealthy families where the mother-in-law squelches the least sign of independence from any of her sons' wives. But you also get the feeling that Chang would be pretty good at squelching upstarts herself! ( )
2 vote thorold | Dec 23, 2015 |
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Chang’s dramas are at heart practical ones, and they stand in an attitude caught between realism and abstraction. ... Or maybe this is just the product of writing inside an overtly determinist political history in which things must therefore seem to happen at the wrong time.
adicionada por paradoxosalpha | editarThe Believer, Phyllis Fong (Nov 1, 2007)
 
Money and the scramble to get it are at the center of many of our best novels, and this is nowhere truer than in the work of Jane Austen. The financial security that Austen's heroines are always chasing is so inextricably entangled with courtship, love and marriage that one can lose sight of the pound notes (not to mention the plantation slavery) behind the lilies, lace and wedding veils.

This is never the case with the world Eileen Chang presents in the tales that constitute "Love in a Fallen City." Think of her as Jane Austen with the gloves off.
adicionada por dcozy | editarJapan Times, David Cozy (Feb 25, 2007)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Chang, Eileenautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Benet Duran, CarlaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kingsbury, Karen S.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Eileen Chang is one of the great writers of twentieth-century China, where she enjoys a passionate following both on the mainland and in Taiwan. At the heart of Chang's achievement is her short fiction - tales of love, longing, and the shifting and endlessly treacherous shoals of family life. Written when she was still in her twenties, these extraordinary stories combine an unsettled, probing, utterly contemporary sensibility, keenly alert to sexual politics and psychological ambiguity, with an intense lyricism that echoes the classics of Chinese literature. Love in a Fallen City, the first collection in English of this dazzling body of work, introduces readers to the stark and glamorous vision of a modern master.

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