Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories (1976)

por Michael Cox (Editor), R.A. Gilbert (Editor)

Outros autores: John Young Akerman (Contribuidor), Robert Hugh Benson (Contribuidor), Algernon Blackwood (Contribuidor), Karen Blixen (Contribuidor), Mary Elizabeth Braddon (Contribuidor)43 mais, Rhoda Broughton (Contribuidor), Bernard Capes (Contribuidor), Wilkie Collins (Contribuidor), B. M. Croker (Contribuidor), Roald Dahl (Contribuidor), Guy de Maupassant (Contribuidor), Charles Dickens (Contribuidor), Arthur Conan Doyle (Contribuidor), Amelia B. Edwards (Contribuidor), Sven Elvestad (Contribuidor), Hanns Heinz Ewers (Contribuidor), Elizabeth Gaskell (Contribuidor), William Fryer Harvey (Contribuidor), R. S. Hawker (Contribuidor), William Hope Hodgson (Contribuidor), Tom Hood (Contribuidor), W. W. Jacobs (Contribuidor), Henry James (Contribuidor), M. R. James (Contribuidor), Jerome K. Jerome (Contribuidor), Rudyard Kipling (Contribuidor), Selma Lagerlöf (Contribuidor), Perceval Landon (Contribuidor), Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (Contribuidor), F. G. Loring (Contribuidor), George Macdonald (Contribuidor), Arthur Machen (Contribuidor), Finn Mehling (Contribuidor), Thomas Street Millington (Contribuidor), Mary Louisa Molesworth (Contribuidor), Rosa Mulholland (Contribuidor), Dinah Mulock (Contribuidor), H. H, Munro (Contribuidor), E. Nesbit (Contribuidor), Barry Pain (Contribuidor), Edgar Allan Poe (Contribuidor), Ellen Price (Contribuidor), Charlotte Riddell (Contribuidor), Robert Louis Stevenson (Contribuidor), Leo Tolstoi (Contribuidor), Beth Toming (Ilustrador), H. G. Wells (Contribuidor), Mary E. Wilkins (Contribuidor)

Séries: Oxford Books of Prose

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões
446541,664 (4.03)Nenhum(a)
"'I think it must have been two o'clock at least when I thought I heard a sound in that--that odious dark recess at the far end of the bedroom....Without at first a suspicion of anything supernatural, on a sudden I saw an old man, rather stout and square, in a sort of roan-red dressing-gown, and with a black cap on his head, moving stiffly and slowly in a diagonal direction, from the recess, across the floor of the bedroom, passing my bed at the foot, and entering the lumber-closet at the left. He had something under his arm; his head hung a little at one side; and, merciful God! when I saw his face....'" There's nothing like a good ghost story. And in Victorian Ghost Stories, Michael Cox and R.A. Gilbert bring together thirty-five well wrought tales of haunted houses, vengeful spirits, spectral warnings, invisible antagonists, and motiveless malignity from beyond the grave. The Victorians excelled at the ghost story, it was as much a part of their literary culture as the realistic novel, and it was practiced by almost all the great writers of the age. Cox and Gilbert here provide samples from Charles Dickens, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry James, and Wilkie Collins, as well as such classic ghost-story specialists as M.R. James and J.S. Le Fanu (whose "Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street," considered one of the best haunted-house story ever written, is excerpted above), plus one or two genuine rarities for the supernatural fiction enthusiast to savor. The editors also reveal the key role played by women in the growth of the genre, including stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, Mrs. Craik, Mrs. Henry Wood, Amelia B. Edwards, Charlotte Riddell, and many others. Finally, they offer an informative introduction, detailed source notes, and an extensive survey of ghost-story collections from 1850 to 1910. Traditional in its forms, but energetically inventive and infused with a relish of the supernatural, these classic ghost stories still retain their original power to unsettle and surprise. Every one is guaranteed to satisfy what Virginia Woolf called "that strange human craving for the pleasure of feeling afraid."… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porRaechill, biblioteca privada, ejmw, FuschiasRoom, Lucas.Sellmer, CalAnderson, amanning1966, cs02, Jyvur_Entropy
Ghosts (139)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

Mostrando 5 de 5
I always wondered why "A Christmas Carol" was a Christmas story with such dark and spooky elements. It seems much more suited to Halloween than more modern sugar-coated Christmas tales. Now, from the introduction to this book I know: it was a common tradition in England in the past (I can’t say for the present) to tell ghost stories on Christmas Eve! The introduction is informative and puts the reader in the right frame of mind to read the stories.
This is not a collection of ghost stories if you want to be scared, though there are a few with elements that raise goosebumps. I found it more valuable as a window into the Victorian Era. The details that the authors add to make the story more lifelike, and thus add to scariness, are also the details most interesting about the period. When they describe the scenery—often detailed descriptions of the rooms where the horrors take place, it also takes the reader back into the past.
On a different note, I love when they describe the when a building was built or last updated not in years, but by what monarch was on the throne at the time. It’s a very charming collection. ( )
  renardkitsune | Sep 9, 2018 |
Wonderfully creepy collection with a wide variety of the more high quality Victorian ghost stories. Particularly enjoyed "At Chrighton Abbey" by [a:Mary Elizabeth Braddon|45896|Mary Elizabeth Braddon|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1202597702p2/45896.jpg] and "An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street" by [a:J.S. Le Fanu|5784865|J.S. Le Fanu|http://www.goodreads.com/assets/nophoto/nophoto-U-50x66-251a730d696018971ef4a443cdeaae05.jpg]. It's a really good book for its representation of many female authors. ( )
  likecymbeline | Apr 1, 2017 |
A marvelous collection of ghost stories specifically gathered to illustrate the way Victorian people viewed these tales. The editors chose stories over the entire Victorian period and they are in chronological order. It's very interesting to see how the tenor of the stories changes over times, towards the end of the period, they're more sinister and less fun. Great book! ( )
  Oodles | Feb 16, 2016 |
Review from Badelynge.
Excellent selection of 35 ghost stories from the Victorian age, chronologically compiled here dating from 1852-1908. The stories included have been selected as much for aspects of innovation or for the part they played in influencing stylistic developments within the genre than their actual quality. Though there are some great ghost stories here and barring three or four stories are generally of very good quality.
Along with the stories are a comprehensive list of all ghost story collections published during the half century of years following 1840, full source details for the 35 stories and an introduction by editor Michael Cox.
Highlights for me include:
The Old Nurse's Story by Elizabeth Gaskell. It's probably the best written ghost story here with superb characterisation, lush prose and as a ghost story endlessly imitated even today.
An Account Of Some Strange Disturbances In Aungier Street by J.S.Le Fanu. One of his best and the veteran of countless anthologies.
The Open Door by Charlotte Riddell. Not particularly scary but a well written example of its type and introducing a rare detective element.
The Captain of the Pole-star by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Eery arctic tale coloured by Doyle's own experience of life on a steam-whaler.
The Kit-bag by Algernon Blackwood. Only Blackwood could imbue such an innocent inanimate object with such a deep sense of malevolent dread.
The only ones I'd have left out would be:
An Eddy On The Floor by Bernard Capes which although suitably macabre is also a shade too long compared to the other entries and probably the least accessible due to its convoluted syntax.
Miss Jeromette And The Clergyman - a very weak effort by Wilkie Collins.
The Tomb of Sarah by F.G.Loring - Nice story but very much a vampire tale.
Reading these in order shows how the genre developed. It's a genre that in the Victorian era was very much designed to be read aloud at the fireside after dinner and ever associated with mid winter and Christmas. It goes through phases of doomed love triangles, vengeful victims, tragic victims of accident defeating mortality to see their loved ones a final time, portentous warnings, cursed objects and places, spiritualism, tragic reenactments etc.
There will probably never be a definitive collection of ghost stories. The editor could easily have selected 35 alternate stories and still pleased this reader as much. I wouldn't have it any other way. ( )
  Finxy | Jul 25, 2011 |
Ghost stories were ludicrously popular during the Victorian period -- a time of huge transition, an age shaped more than any other by change, mostly industrial, but with the final consequences of these changes remaining unclear. With this shadow of change falling across life in general culminating, no doubt, in anxiety, the ghost story not only gave the Victorian reader an outlet for this anxiety but the ghosts themselves anchored a stable past in an unstable present.

Having said all this I was quite disappointed with this anthology. Some of the stories are brilliant; those by Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Jerome K Jerome, RLStevenson and Conan Doyle stand out particularly of course (although Kipling's offering is poor in the extreme); but most of them are formulaic, haunted house stories, which perhaps in the context of the time, read once a week in a magazine or so forth, were entertaining but when read one after another are a little tiresome.

My favourite was that by Elizabeth Gaskell. However, I'm not entirely sure if this is because it's any better than the others or because it was the first one and therefore still maintained an element of surprise! ( )
  ishtahar | Apr 6, 2008 |
Mostrando 5 de 5
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Cox, MichaelEditorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Gilbert, R.A.Editorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Akerman, John YoungContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Benson, Robert HughContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Blackwood, AlgernonContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Blixen, KarenContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Braddon, Mary ElizabethContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Broughton, RhodaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Capes, BernardContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Collins, WilkieContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Croker, B. M.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Dahl, RoaldContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
de Maupassant, GuyContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Dickens, CharlesContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Doyle, Arthur ConanContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Edwards, Amelia B.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Elvestad, SvenContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Ewers, Hanns HeinzContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Gaskell, ElizabethContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Harvey, William FryerContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hawker, R. S.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hodgson, William HopeContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hood, TomContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Jacobs, W. W.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
James, HenryContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
James, M. R.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Jerome, Jerome K.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Kipling, RudyardContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Lagerlöf, SelmaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Landon, PercevalContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Le Fanu, Joseph SheridanContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Loring, F. G.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Macdonald, GeorgeContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Machen, ArthurContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Mehling, FinnContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Millington, Thomas StreetContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Molesworth, Mary LouisaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Mulholland, RosaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Mulock, DinahContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Munro, H. H,Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Nesbit, E.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Pain, BarryContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Poe, Edgar AllanContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Price, EllenContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Riddell, CharlotteContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Stevenson, Robert LouisContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Tolstoi, LeoContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Toming, BethIlustradorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Wells, H. G.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Wilkins, Mary E.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em norueguês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Do not combine "Victorian Ghost Stories" with "Victorian Tales of Mystery and Detection." Both are Oxford Anthologies edited by Michael Cox and R. A. Gilbert. These are two different books. "Victorian Ghost Stories" and "The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories" are the same book.
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

"'I think it must have been two o'clock at least when I thought I heard a sound in that--that odious dark recess at the far end of the bedroom....Without at first a suspicion of anything supernatural, on a sudden I saw an old man, rather stout and square, in a sort of roan-red dressing-gown, and with a black cap on his head, moving stiffly and slowly in a diagonal direction, from the recess, across the floor of the bedroom, passing my bed at the foot, and entering the lumber-closet at the left. He had something under his arm; his head hung a little at one side; and, merciful God! when I saw his face....'" There's nothing like a good ghost story. And in Victorian Ghost Stories, Michael Cox and R.A. Gilbert bring together thirty-five well wrought tales of haunted houses, vengeful spirits, spectral warnings, invisible antagonists, and motiveless malignity from beyond the grave. The Victorians excelled at the ghost story, it was as much a part of their literary culture as the realistic novel, and it was practiced by almost all the great writers of the age. Cox and Gilbert here provide samples from Charles Dickens, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry James, and Wilkie Collins, as well as such classic ghost-story specialists as M.R. James and J.S. Le Fanu (whose "Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street," considered one of the best haunted-house story ever written, is excerpted above), plus one or two genuine rarities for the supernatural fiction enthusiast to savor. The editors also reveal the key role played by women in the growth of the genre, including stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, Mrs. Craik, Mrs. Henry Wood, Amelia B. Edwards, Charlotte Riddell, and many others. Finally, they offer an informative introduction, detailed source notes, and an extensive survey of ghost-story collections from 1850 to 1910. Traditional in its forms, but energetically inventive and infused with a relish of the supernatural, these classic ghost stories still retain their original power to unsettle and surprise. Every one is guaranteed to satisfy what Virginia Woolf called "that strange human craving for the pleasure of feeling afraid."

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.03)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 13
3.5 1
4 25
4.5 4
5 13

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 157,695,371 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível