Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

The Royal Arch, Its Hidden Meaning por…
A carregar...

The Royal Arch, Its Hidden Meaning (edição 1946)

por George H. Steinmetz

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões
531386,707Nenhum(a)Nenhum(a)
Membro:MHLodge14
Título:The Royal Arch, Its Hidden Meaning
Autores:George H. Steinmetz
Informação:
Colecções:York Rite / Scottish Rite - GL of NJ Library
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The Royal Arch: Its Hidden Meaning por George H. Steinmetz

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

Steinmetz provides a metaphysical interpretation of the rituals of Royal Arch Freemasonry as worked in the 20th-century United States. His book stands as a representative instance of mid-century Anglophone occultism, including the ERRATIC use of ALL CAPS. Authorities cited include H.P. Blavatsky, A.E. Waite, and Max Heindel, but he largely sticks to the features of the rituals themselves. There's nothing innovative among occultists about his basic ideas, which include reincarnation as an esoteric Masonic doctrine, as well as the relevance of astrological symbolism to the Royal Arch degree. He does, however, find new ways to confuse the ritual hermeneutic.

For example, when discussing the misapplied persistence of the Biblical span of "470 years" in the ritual, he suggests that "we follow the procedure of the Kabalist, and take away from this number the zero (0)," and proceeds to interpret the resulting forty-seven in relation to Euclid's 47th problem. (72) Had he been genuinely familiar with qabalistic "procedure," Steinmetz might have noticed that the gematria of the Hebrew OTh ("time" or "period of time") and DVR DVRIM ("eternity," lit. "age of ages") is 470, and thus "470 years" in both the Bible and the Royal Arch ceremony is simply the passage of a generic eon.

An even richer example arises in his insistence that "in the original Hebrew God is quoted as saying: 'And God said unto Moses IHVH and he said, thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, IHVH hath sent me unto you.'" (78) Of course, anyone with a Tanakh handy can quickly debunk this nonsense. In Exodus 3:14--the verse cited by Steinmetz--the theophany utters "AHIH AShR AHIH," and names itself AHIH (Eheieh). Half the letters of a Tetragrammaton isn't nearly close enough. An error like this one, seeming to firm up his thesis, just throws Steinmetz's aptitude into question.

Finally, he contends that the traditional discovered name of the Royal Arch is the product of "late eighteenth century attempts at mysticism which result in the ridiculous." (125) Whether Steinmetz's chosen experts Mackey and Breasted are correct that ON was only and always a place-name and not a name or title of a deity (or whether on the contrary, Forlong is correct in identifying the rising sun with the hare-god Un), the reader must be unimpressed by his "considerable research" that failed to find Jah among Hebrew names of God. Ultimately, his attempts to render meaningless the complex mystery of the Royal Arch Word seem ironic indeed, considering the fanciful and fatuous etymology he provides for the exoteric name Israel: IS from the goddess Isis, RA the Egyptian god, and EL the Semitic "lord." (103)

The appended paper on "Freemasonry and Astrology" by George S. Faison is inoffensive, but has little to recommend it. Faison unhistorically presents astrology as essentially concerned with psychological character. His efforts to tie its symbolism to Masonry, where credible, depend on its genuine presence in Hebrew scripture. For that, the reader is better off consulting a text which directly addresses the topic, like Drummond's Oedipus Judaicus.
2 vote paradoxosalpha | Sep 30, 2009 |
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: Sem avaliações.

GenreThing

No genres

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 160,270,199 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível