Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

Trawl

por B. S. Johnson

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
742284,900 (3.75)21
In his heyday, during the 1960s and early 1970s, B. S. Johnson was one of the best-known novelists in Britain. A passionate advocate for the avant-garde in both literature and film, he became famous for his forthright views on the future of the novel and for his unique ways of putting them into practice. Reissued as standalone books for the first time in many years, these are B. S. Johnson's most famous and critically acclaimed novels.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 21 menções

Mostrando 2 de 2
Taking a cliché seriously and forcing the reader to think about what the words actually mean is a classic poetic device. But there probably aren't many writers who would be prepared to put themselves through three weeks of chronic physical discomfort and deprivation merely to justify their use of a corny metaphor. That, however, seems to be exactly what B.S. Johnson was up to when he joined a Hull trawler for a fishing voyage in the Barents Sea, to spend much of the time lying in his bunk suffering from terrible seasickness while he made a trawl through memories of his early life.

The result, as Jon McGregor suggests in his introduction to the 2013 reissue, is certainly "one of the finest novels about seasickness ever written." But it's also a fascinating (fictionalised) autobiography, in which Johnson takes us through the experiences of his wartime childhood, evacuated from London first to a farm in Surrey and then to High Wycombe. And through some of the more-or-less disastrous erotic adventures of his early years as a clerk and later a student in London.

Like practically all sex in British novels of the fifties and sixties, the bedroom scenes are catastrophically inept: rooms are inadequately heated, walls are too thin, clothes are awkward to take on and off and get tangled at awkward moments, condoms are a constant source of trouble and alarm, the participants usually turn out at a critical stage in proceedings to have had different, conflicting, agendas, and the evidence of what has happened has to be concealed from parents/landladies/flatmates afterwards. Johnson has a gift for making these episodes — in other writers often merely painful — both comic and touching, and his narrator always gives the impression of being open about his own inexperience and bad behaviour. He behaves like a man of his time, but in hindsight he's aware of his failure to take proper notice of what the women might have wanted.

The life of the fishing boat at first doesn't intrude very much into the narrator's self-centred reflections, apart from providing him with the need to vomit at intervals, but as we go on he starts to tell us more and more about the trawlermen and the work they do. And the fish — there are some wonderfully vivid descriptions of the varied catch that comes out of the net. At times the book almost strays into the territory of journalism or travel writing.

The two streams of narrative in the book seem to converge in the narrator's troubled sense of his own class-identity: in childhood, the kids in Surrey and High Wycombe looked down on him as a working-class Londoner; now he is cut off from the trawlermen by their sense of him as a graduate and a writer, despite his own (self-mocking, but still half-serious) idea of himself as someone who is doing hard physical work with his pen and notebook. Most of his relationships with women seem to have stranded on difficulties of class as well, although there is also an undercurrent of "perhaps it's just that no-one likes me". Or perhaps I'm just reading that in from knowing that it was depression that cut Johnson's life short so young.

Johnson is known for hard-core experimental tricks with the physical form of his books, but this one is almost conventional, with its only really obvious departure from classic book design being in the use of inline pauses  ·  ·  of various lengths  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  marked by dots, which take the place of conventional paragraph breaks. Not especially intrusive, and you soon get used to it. It's hard to say whether the subtle difference between — say — a five-dot pause and a seven-dot pause really makes a difference to our reading, but I'm prepared to give him the benefit of the doubt.

Not just a period-piece, definitely something that's still worth reading today. ( )
  thorold | Jan 22, 2020 |
This book by B. S. Johnson written in 1966 is a book about a man who has decided to take a trip on a fishing boat. He is not a seasoned fisherman. In fact he is sick, sick a lot. We, the reader, get to hear of his memories of his past. He spews these out just like he spews everything in his gut. It is a mess, out of order, without necessarily making sense and the author tells us that maybe he is wrong in his memories. The narrator is essentially alone and isolated. He does not fit in with the crew and being sick keeps him from making any connections.This author was experimental in his approach and therefore he did contribute to the development of the novel. ( )
  Kristelh | Aug 14, 2019 |
Mostrando 2 de 2
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

In his heyday, during the 1960s and early 1970s, B. S. Johnson was one of the best-known novelists in Britain. A passionate advocate for the avant-garde in both literature and film, he became famous for his forthright views on the future of the novel and for his unique ways of putting them into practice. Reissued as standalone books for the first time in many years, these are B. S. Johnson's most famous and critically acclaimed novels.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.75)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5 1
4 4
4.5
5

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 160,445,421 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível