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Prelude to Foundation por Isaac Asimov
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Prelude to Foundation (original 1988; edição 1994)

por Isaac Asimov

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7,16686988 (3.73)1 / 59
In the year 12,020 G.E., Hari Seldon arrives in the domed city of Trantor and begins to develop his theory of psychohistory, which predicts the rise of a power greater than the Empire.
Membro:OzMerry
Título:Prelude to Foundation
Autores:Isaac Asimov
Informação:Voyager, Paperback, 464 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Prelude to Foundation por Isaac Asimov (1988)

Adicionado recentemente porStarfinder, biblioteca privada, sdvorak, meowbooks, DeLarco, 9alecj, Samuel.Lutwidge, Gloum
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Inglês (77)  Italiano (3)  Francês (2)  Russo (1)  Eslovaco (1)  Checo (1)  Húngaro (1)  Todas as línguas (86)
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This book was Asimov's retrospective account of the early years of Hari Seldon as he groped towards founding his science of psychohistory, with which he later guided the work of the Foundations that he caused to be set up in the original Foundation trilogy in order to bring order to the chaos of the declining and disintegrating Galactic Empire. This is a story of Seldon's flight through various sectors of the imperial capital planet Trantor from the mysterious hostile forces pursuing him to gain the secrets of psychohistory that they believe he holds. There are some great characters in here and a good narrative drive. This was Asimov at the height of his SF writing powers during their second wind in the 1980s. ( )
1 vote john257hopper | Dec 5, 2021 |
Whew, what to make of this? I'm beginning to think I prefer Asimov's non-fiction. His fiction was ever a bit (or more than a bit) clunky, talky and static ... to be honest, the exalted status of the Foundation Trilogy in sf-dom always puzzled me a little, since -- while I enjoyed it, don't get me wrong -- I far preferred other series, even as a youngun ... James Blish's Cities in Flight, for example.

While I was reading this novel, a poor pun kept occurring to me: that Asimov's writing here didn't so much engender a "sense of wonder" (itself a much-maligned term) as a "sense of blunder" -- a kind of "oh, god, Isaac ... *really*?" This echoed with particular volume during the Mycogenian sequence ... where Hari Seldon and Dors Venabili encounter a Trantorian subculture where -- da da DUMMM -- hair is considered obscene. Golly. The future isn't so much unimaginable as just plain stupid.

It's kind of a commonplace to say that Asimov's writing improved as he aged, but in a way I disagree. I came away from this feeling like the freshness and ... eagerness? ... of the early work has been lost, and what's left is just slightly embarrassing. I remember that many years ago TV legend Norman Lear attempted a comeback with a new series (I can't remember the name) and, while on the surface he was doing the very same things that made his earlier work groundbreaking, funny and trenchant, the formula just didn't work any more and it failed with a clunk. There's a similar feeling here, for me at least.

(And It's somewhat creepier to take note of Asimov's leer-y attitude toward the female body here, since his status as sf-dom's "Man with a Hundred Hands" reputation has become more widely known. That made me sad)

Still, I kept reading. Why? I'm not sure. Uncle Isaac is so genial. I had fun. And the ending was a neat surprise, I thought. ( )
  tungsten_peerts | Oct 25, 2021 |
I read it when I was a teenager but I re-read it when the new Foundation series came out on Apple TV+. It's quite suspenseful, and there were many laugh-out-loud moments. I'd forgotten how funny Asimov could be. There were surprises at the end, and I'd forgotten some of them, so it was fun to be surprised all over again. ( )
  troymcc | Oct 20, 2021 |
Well, wasn't this a dreadful little book?

It's been decades since I read any Asimov, but I remember him with fondness for the original Foundation trilogy I read in the late-70s, along with several of his other novels.

I do, however, have no recollection of his narrative style whatsoever. After finishing this travesty, that actually scares the shit out of me for considering the other nine books in this series.

Prelude to Foundation reads like it was written by a somewhat over-intelligent twelve-year-old who then handed it off to a university professor with absolutely no sense of humour to do final edits.

I've decided, at least for this book, that Asimov is the exact antithesis of both [a:Stephen R. Donaldson|12980|Stephen R. Donaldson|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1425823085p2/12980.jpg] and [a:Elmore Leonard|12940|Elmore Leonard|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1240015224p2/12940.jpg], for different things.

Where Donaldson loves to write pages and pages and pages of dialogue where characters are consistently frustrated because they need answers to questions--and Donaldson actually has them mull the precise questions over in their minds but never verbalize them--then become angry when they can't find the answers they seek, despite talking around the real question but somehow never getting to it. Asimov, on the other hand, just has the most bare bones, unnuanced conversations you'll ever read. There's no subtext, there's no ulterior motives, there's only straight, unvarnished, completely honest talk. If a character needs to ask something, he asks it, and the answer comes. If a character needs to argue, he busts out logic and the other side accepts that logical argument and moves on. It's awful.

Then there's Elmore Leonard, a man who built a career out of having characters speak and their speech sang with humanity. They sounded real, they sounded wonderful, they often spoke in circles, or buried their answers in sarcasm or venom. They rarely gave straight answers, always with some other angle they were playing, but by god, you could hear that talking in your head like the characters were in the room with you. Asimov, on the other hand, writes the driest, most uninspired, overly-logical, overly-factual dialogue you'll find this side of a first time author's unedited self-published book. It's awful.

There's no nuance. There's no blind alleys. There's no personality. There's no exploration of humanity or interpersonal relationships.

There's only facts. If Hari Seldon is in a bind and needs to find a way out of it, the very next person he'll meet is the precise one he needs to meet at that time.

Then there's the stunning differences in the various areas of the planet he explores. "We think hair is disgusting!" or "If I shave my mustache, I am eliminating my manhood!" Yes, they may have some parallels in the real world, but when speculating on humankind 20,000 years in the future, this is the best you could do?

And then, there's the theoretical point of the novel, where Hari Seldon gains the breakthrough that allows him to turn his theoretical psycho-historical projections into a practical application. It happens off-stage and is delivered in the most uninspiring, anti-climactic scene I may have ever read.

Look, Asimov was a brilliant man. But, for a guy with over 500 books under his belt, I expected a hell of a lot more talent with basic characters and dialogue here. This was absolutely, without a doubt, terrible, and it's this type of book that's held up as an example of why non-SF readers don't read the genre.

There's nothing to be found here. Move on. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
Science Fiction
  hpryor | Aug 8, 2021 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Isaac Asimovautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Anselmi, PieroTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cormier, WilArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Segrelles, VicenteArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
White, TimArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Youll, StephenArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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CLEON I - The last Galactic Emperor of the Entun dynasty. (Chapter 1 Headnote)
Suppressing a small yawn, Cleon said, "Demerzel, have you by any chance ever heard of a man named Hari Seldon?"
Text:
Suppressing a small yawn, Cleon said, 'Demerzel, have you by any chance ever heard of a man named Hari Seldon?'
When I wrote "Foundation," which appeared in the May 1942 issue of Astounding Science Fiction, I had no idea that I had begun a series of stories that would eventually grow into six volumes and a total of 650,000 words (so far). (Author's Note)
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In the year 12,020 G.E., Hari Seldon arrives in the domed city of Trantor and begins to develop his theory of psychohistory, which predicts the rise of a power greater than the Empire.

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