Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Becoming a Tiger: How Baby Animals Learn to…
A carregar...

Becoming a Tiger: How Baby Animals Learn to Live in the Wild (original 2004; edição 2004)

por Susan McCarthy

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1052200,292 (3.96)1
Contrary to common belief, not everything is "hardwired"--or instinctual--in the animal kingdom. Many skills a wild animal needs to thrive, to grow, to be what nature intended, must be developed through play, painstaking teaching, and often treacherous trial and error. The coming-of-age processes of the myriad creatures of plain, forest, ocean, and jungle are truly fascinating natural events. In this book, McCarthy offers readers an in-depth look into the ways baby animals learn not only about themselves, but about their world and ours--and how to survive in both. Based on extensive scientific research done in the lab, in controlled "natural" settings, as well as in the wild, her findings provide new insights into the lives and development of Earth's nonhuman inhabitants--not only tigers, but lions, bears, bats, rats, birds, dolphins, whales, apes, elephants, and dozens of other species.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:sunnydale
Título:Becoming a Tiger: How Baby Animals Learn to Live in the Wild
Autores:Susan McCarthy
Informação:HarperCollins, 2004
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****1/2
Etiquetas:animals, animal behavior, animal intelligence, baby animals

Pormenores da obra

Becoming a Tiger: How Baby Animals Learn to Live in the Wild por Susan McCarthy (2004)

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 1 menção

Mostrando 2 de 2
Generally speaking I only like hard science books on animal behaviour and so I put off reading this for a while because I thought it would be fluffy stories of sweet little animals. It didn't help that the author often collaborates on books with Jeffrey Moussaieff, the master of the fluffy animal behavioural tome. However, one day, without any new book to read I thought I would give it a try. It was amazing!

The problem with the strictly-scientific animal behaviour books is that the research is generally done in laboratories where the animal lives an extremely deprived life. The problems it is expected to solve are ones that interest people, not necessarily ones that interest a bored animal. (Or person for that matter. I was recently reading of an experiment where the pigeons who got the answers right were rewarded with seeds to eat. They did a lot better than the test group of students who were only rewarded by a sound. Perhaps the students would have scored better given an M&M or gummy bear).

However, if an animal behaviour book is based solely on field and anectodal observation it has a tendency to be tainted with anthropomorphism. Hence my dislike for the overly-emotional Moussaieff books.

This often-amusing and very easy to read book is a mixture of hard science and scientist-gathered field observation and anecdotal reportage. Thus we learn that although gorillas when tested in a laboratory do not recognise themselves in mirrors, one gorilla who had not only a mirror but a video camera and monitor in his room could certainly recognise himself. He liked to eat his food up close to the camera and watch himself in the monitor. Further, he liked to shine a torch down his throat directly under the camera whilst looking in the monitor. Certainly this gorilla could identify himself and perhaps this means that all previous tests on gorillas have been badly-designed. Without this anecdotal information I would forever be thinking that gorillas couldn't recognise themselves.

Each section of the book moves along rapidly, each paragraph contains a gem of research or reportage, everything from the high problem solving abilities of the cannibalistic portia spider to the strange lengths humans sometimes go to in experiments. (In order for Whooping Cranes to avoid imprinting on people, the experimenters dressed up in crane suits, fed the birds with dummy cranes and when leading them on their first migration, the pilot of the plane was dressed in a crane suit too).

If you only ever read one book on animal behaviour and intelligence, make it this one, you will enjoy it. But then, this will hook you so much, it won't be your only one. Now I have to find more books by Susan McCarthy, she's got me hooked. ( )
  Petra.Xs | Apr 2, 2013 |
Fascinating book filled with wonderful anecdotes that illustrate and enliven McCarthy's explanations. McCarthy's research is excellent, as shown by the detailed notes and lengthy biography, yet the book is very accessible and fun to read thanks to McCarthy's light touch and occasional humorously irreverent comment. As a popular book rather than a scholarly one it has much more breadth than depth, which makes it easy and fun to read. ( )
  sunnydale | Oct 3, 2006 |
Mostrando 2 de 2
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Contrary to common belief, not everything is "hardwired"--or instinctual--in the animal kingdom. Many skills a wild animal needs to thrive, to grow, to be what nature intended, must be developed through play, painstaking teaching, and often treacherous trial and error. The coming-of-age processes of the myriad creatures of plain, forest, ocean, and jungle are truly fascinating natural events. In this book, McCarthy offers readers an in-depth look into the ways baby animals learn not only about themselves, but about their world and ours--and how to survive in both. Based on extensive scientific research done in the lab, in controlled "natural" settings, as well as in the wild, her findings provide new insights into the lives and development of Earth's nonhuman inhabitants--not only tigers, but lions, bears, bats, rats, birds, dolphins, whales, apes, elephants, and dozens of other species.--From publisher description.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.96)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5 2
4 2
4.5 1
5 4

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 157,836,650 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível