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Shirley Jackson's The Lottery : the…
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Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" : the authorized graphic adaptation (edição 2016)

por Miles Hyman, Shirley Jackson

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
17516121,201 (3.76)4
Shirley Jackson's The Lottery continues to thrill and unsettle readers nearly seven decades after it was first published. By turns puzzling and harrowing, it raises troubling questions about conformity, tradition, and the specter of ritualised violence that haunts even the most bucolic, peaceful village. This graphic adaptation, published in time for Jackson's centennial, allows readers to experience The Lottery as never before, or discover it anew. The visual artist - and Jackson's grandson - Miles Hyman has crafted an eerie vision of the hamlet where the tale unfolds, its inhabitants, and the unforgettable ritual they set into motion. His four-colour, meticulously detailed panels create an atmosphere that adds a new dimension of dread to the original tale. Perfectly timed to the current resurgence of interest in Jackson and her work, Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery": A Graphic Adaptation masterfully reimagines her iconic story with a striking visual narrative.… (mais)
Membro:HillMurraySchool
Título:Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" : the authorized graphic adaptation
Autores:Miles Hyman
Outros autores:Shirley Jackson
Informação:New York : Hill and Wang, 2016.
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Graphic Novel, 20th C. American Literature, short story, Classic, dystopian society

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Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery": The Authorized Graphic Adaptation por Miles Hyman

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Mostrando 1-5 de 15 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
When I was getting this book ready so many students got excited, "Is that the story we read in class?" I told them it was indeed the same. I don't expect to see it much for the rest of the year.

The art is very evocative of the setting and time frame. The prose is spare but still tells the story. I was left with as many questions this time as I was when I read it as a teen. Why? How could they? Why?

For librarians--there is female nudity when a woman takes a bath to prepare for the lottery.
An interesting note in the book tells a story of the artist's grandmother, who was Shirley Jackson. ( )
1 vote readingbeader | Oct 29, 2020 |
A wonderfully creepy graphic novel adaptation. The art is perfect, both ordinary and kind of menacing in its ordinariness. ( )
1 vote katebrarian | Jul 28, 2020 |
One of the greatest stories ever written, the adaptation looks beautiful and rawboned but drags a bit and the famous ending loses its potency. A fine effort. ( )
  ThomasPluck | Apr 27, 2020 |
This was a nice version of the story. It is still crazy how this story ends. It shows how some things have to grow and change. Just a great story. It really makes you think. ( )
  LVStrongPuff | Dec 19, 2019 |
Hyman introduces two prominent changes with his adaptation of Jackson's iconic short story:
● Scene 1 - Two officials preparing the ballots before dawn
● Scene 2 - Tessie alone in the house before Lottery begins
(There is another scene in a diner which transposes into dialogue some of Jackson's descriptive prose. It also may be new, I do not examine that scene in detail.)

Hyman's adaptation does not include Jackson's complete text, though without tracking word-for-word, my impression is that most if not all included text is verbatim. Most text here is dialogue, with occasional comic-style captions; most excluded text appears to be description, for which Hyman substitutes images.

The illustrations remind me of William Joyce's affected 1930s graphic design, similarly stylised though in Hyman's case not art deco. (If there's a term for this style of illustration, I don't know it.) The illustrations are I think well suited to the story, a frisson between nostalgic sentiment and the brutality of the crowd which works in tandem with the plot.

Arguably one could read Hyman's adaptation without his additions. Indeed, Hyman inserts both scenes before Jackson's opening lines and then proceeds faithfully through the rest of the story. It is a simple matter to skip his additions, commencing instead with the helpful caption containing Jackson's famous first lines ("The morning of June 27th was clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full-summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green."). So why add these scenes, then -- what does their inclusion contribute to the story?

One possible answer is they assist in the visual telling of the story -- both new sections are practically wordless. This explanation appears especially relevant to the first new scene, with the careful preparation of a ballot box, suggesting an important vote of some kind will occur, and these images replace scattered phrases in Jackson's story which more or less impart the same information. Another possible explanation is Hyman has added new information, as though providing backstory of his own invention or restoring passages Jackson may have excised.

Scene 2 is different from Scene 1. Scene 2 depicts Tessie alone in her house and is completely new and not alluded to in Jackson's story. The scene is somewhat in tension with Tessie's later sheepish admission to a neighbour that she forgot the date, not because they contradict this chain of events but because --when viewed after finishing the story-- her actions seem contemplative and even a kind of preparation for leave-taking. Admittedly, at the end of Scene 2, Tessie appears to become aware of her surroundings, as though recalling what day it is, just as she confesses later. The tension may be wholly supplied by the reader, then. As a visual substitute for these lines, however, the scene both fails and is superfluous. Superfluous because Hyman includes the text verbatim later on; and a failure because Tessie's seeming realisation at the end of the scene is visually subtle, discernible only at the suggestion of her own statement. Without that confession, there is nothing definitive visually except that she finishes bathing.

What then, do the scenes do? Effectively they prolong the text by slowing down the reader and the moment, thereby postponing the climax. Jackson's original text slows the reader's progress with a languid, almost tranquil description of people gathering, but even when depicted individually (Hyman devotes several pages of multiple panels to these scenes), the eyes still propel the plot along, especially as there is very little text to read. Hyman's additional scenes restore the languid pace, and the resulting delayed gratification not only is congruous with Jackson's original text, it is for me a crucial element of pacing for both the final reveal, and the sense of the story overall.

I note here that Hyman's adaptation is authorized by Jackson's estate, and that he is Jackson's grandson, a fact he readily discloses in his preface. My reading already lead me to conclude Hyman does not add new information in the sense of backstory or cutting-room floor edits. Though the Jackson estate imprimatur is of course not the same as Jackson's personal approval, it goes some way in corroborating my own conclusion.

//

An observation not specific to this adaptation but inclusive of Jackson's original story: "The Lottery" resonates with the American tradition of public lynchings, during which a community gathers with a mixture of celebration and somber observation, and murders a member or members of the community. To be clear: the white members murder a black member of the community. The selection of murder victim is random at both the micro and macro levels: most immediately, because the black person was a convenient scapegoat or was the enemy of a white person for reasons unrelated to the "reason" given for their lynching; and generally, because it is entirely accidental (in the Aristotelian sense) that the black person was born with physical traits considered by their community as deserving execution.

Whether intentional or consciously a part of Jackson's writing, the resonance between the story and so important an aspect of American history is striking. In his preface to The Magic of Shirley Jackson, her husband remarked that Jackson “was always proud that the Union of South Africa banned 'The Lottery,' and she felt that they at least understood the story.” Suggests to me the parallel was part of Jackson's thinking, though it's curious she doesn't raise this point in her "Biography of a Story" or various other places in which she discusses the story or its reception. ( )
4 vote elenchus | Nov 30, 2018 |
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Shirley Jackson's The Lottery continues to thrill and unsettle readers nearly seven decades after it was first published. By turns puzzling and harrowing, it raises troubling questions about conformity, tradition, and the specter of ritualised violence that haunts even the most bucolic, peaceful village. This graphic adaptation, published in time for Jackson's centennial, allows readers to experience The Lottery as never before, or discover it anew. The visual artist - and Jackson's grandson - Miles Hyman has crafted an eerie vision of the hamlet where the tale unfolds, its inhabitants, and the unforgettable ritual they set into motion. His four-colour, meticulously detailed panels create an atmosphere that adds a new dimension of dread to the original tale. Perfectly timed to the current resurgence of interest in Jackson and her work, Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery": A Graphic Adaptation masterfully reimagines her iconic story with a striking visual narrative.

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