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The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales por…
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The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales (edição 2016)

por Dominik Parisien (Editor)

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2521181,787 (3.85)13
An all-new anthology of cross-genre fairy tale retellings, featuring an all-star lineup of award-winning and critically acclaimed writers. Once upon a time. It's how so many of our most beloved stories start. Fairy tales have dominated our cultural imagination for centuries. From the Brothers Grimm to the Countess d'Aulnoy, from Charles Perrault to Hans Christian Anderson, storytellers have crafted all sorts of tales that have always found a place in our hearts. Now a new generation of storytellers have taken up the mantle that the masters created and shaped their stories into something startling and electrifying. Packed with award-winning authors, this anthology explores an array of fairy tales in startling and innovative ways, in genres and settings both traditional and unusual, including science fiction, western, and post-apocalyptic as well as traditional fantasy and contemporary horror. From the woods to the stars, The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales takes readers on a journey at once unexpected and familiar, as a diverse group of writers explore some of our most beloved tales in new ways across genres and styles. Contains stories by: Charlie Jane Anders, Aliette de Bodard, Amal El-mohtar, Jeffrey Ford, Max Gladstone, Theodora Goss, Daryl Gregory, Kat Howard, Stephen Graham Jones, Margo Lanagan, Marjorie Liu, Seanan McGuire, Garth Nix, Naomi Novik, Sofia Samatar, Karin Tidbeck, Catherynne M. Valente, and Genevieve Valentine.… (mais)
Membro:Sorcyress
Título:The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales
Autores:Dominik Parisien (Editor)
Informação:Saga Press (2016), 400 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales por Dominik Parisien (Editor)

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    The Mythic Dream por Navah Wolfe (g33kgrrl)
    g33kgrrl: Excellent anthologies by some of the best editors in the business.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Five stars for Amal El-Mohtar's story Seasons Of Glass And Iron (which is the only sorry I've read from this book). I really enjoyed it! ( )
  Stamat | Apr 20, 2021 |
As with most short story anthologies, this one is a mixed bag. Some of the stories I liked, some of them I didn't like. However, in this case, some of them I *really* didn't like. Also, I couldn't help but notice that with a couple of exceptions (out of eighteen) the stories were all retellings of Western fairy tales. While I do like retellings where I know the original material, I thought there was so much more room for exploration of other cultures in this book of supposedly "new" fairy tales.

I did enjoy a few of the stories a lot ("Reflected" by Kat Howard, "The Other Thea" by Theodora Goss, "Pearl" by Aliette de Bodard, and "Seasons of Glass and Iron" by Amal El-Mohtar which I'd read before) and some of the stories a little ("The Briar and the Rose" by Marjorie M. Liu, "In the Desert Like a Bone" by Seanan McGuire, and "Giants in the Sky" by Max Gladstone which I felt almost went over my head) but there were some I just didn't like at all ("Even the Crumbs Were Delicious" by Daryl Gregory, "Badgirl, the Deadman, and the Wheel of Fortune" by Catherynne M. Valente, and most especially "When I Lay Frozen" by Margo Lanagan which I liked even less after I read the author's notes afterward). ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | Oct 14, 2020 |
When they say fairy tales retold, they don’t mean “Rapunzel in middle school” or “Cinderella in cyberpunk“. This is more “crank up the maturity by adding sex, drugs, and woman abuse” type of retelling. The themes are skewed toward “men are the devil, women are helpless”. The writing is parched and lifeless and bleak. “The man put a seed in her belly. She lay there while he lay on top of her and did his thing.” And I mean literally using the terms “did his thing”.

Everything screams “I AM WOMAN” and “my character is defined by my womanhood. Whether I spread my legs and let a man on top of me or a take a lover (male or female because love should be free) or I’m a woman in a man’s role. I scream womanness and I have no point beyond that but to be a woman and exist in relationship to men.”

I get that lots of fairy tales are about women suffering due to the actions of men. But when you’re revamping those tales for current sensibilities, they don’t all have to turn it on the same head. Viewing everything from the same lens is dull. Plus it makes everyone unlikable. And I certainly don’t want to read about it over and over.

Especially the female authors. They treat their stories like they’re an artsy short film–all experimental and pretentious. Some of them call it “playing with form”. I call it choosing form over function. Construct over content. Should a collection of short stories really be your experimental ground?

Oh, and two of the stories are of the “set in a world from another story I wrote” variety, and I HATE that. Making your short story as if it’s an advertisement for your other book series. No wonder short stories fell out of favor. ( )
  theWallflower | May 18, 2020 |
Perhaps, she thinks, what’s strange is the shoes women are made to wear: shoes of glass; shoes of paper; shoes of iron heated red–hot; shoes to dance to death in.

The two female protagonists of this story are both bound by their fairytale curses, and they must decide whether it's worth leaving them behind. I loved how this story was a classic fairytale and yet the opposite of one, and it also referenced many other stories about women and curses.

That being said... I roll my eyes at the Wikipedia stating "they become friends, and their lives change" because well. Harold. ( )
  runtimeregan | Jun 12, 2019 |
Thank you to Navah Wolfe for the OLUF Mystery Maccabee gift!
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In The Desert Like a Bone - 3. A good yarn, but a bit too message/moral heavy.
Underground - 3. Same as above. Tidbeck is too intent on driving home a certain message, and it clogs the story up. Additionally, the main character makes bizarre, out of character choices in order to fit with the original story structure. Still pretty decent, though.
Even the Crumbs Were Delicious - DNF.
The Super Ultra Duchess of Fedora Forest - 1. I just don't like Charlie Jane Anders' writing style.
Familiaris - 5. An utterly creepy, beautiful meditation on motherhood and female independence.
Seasons of Glass and Iron - 4. A really lovely and thought-provoking setup, but again the author is just a little too intent on hitting us over the head with her message.
Badgirl, the Deadman, and The Wheel of Fortune - 5. Look, there was never any question Valente was going to knock this one out of the park. She's one of the best fantasy writers alive today. This story is quite different than most of her other work, but it's still outstanding in every way. Adore.
Penny for a Match, Mister? - 5. Also very good. I'm not usually a fan of short stories in anthologies like this being set in the world of an author's other work, especially one I haven't read, but this one works quite well. Creepy and excellent.
Some Wait - 2. I was confused by what exactly was happening in this one. Weird, and not in a good way.
The Thousand Eyes - 4. Ford captures the atmospheric creepiness of this story masterfully. Excellent sense of place.
Giants in the Sky - 3. Funny, but Gladstone's worldbuilding is so skimpy I had a great deal of trouble following the story.
The Briar and the Rose - 4. What a wonderful romance.
The Other Thea - 2. Goss has created an interesting world, but she's far too intent on smacking the story's moral over our heads. This story needs a defter, more subtle hand.
When I Lay Frozen - 1. I really hate Margo Lanagan's writing. It just doesn't do it for me.
Pearl - 5. Unexpectedly gorgeous and lovely. Just really powerful, wonderful writing. Maybe I should be reading more of de Bodard.
The Tale of Mahliya and Mauhub and the White-Footed Gazelle - 3. I reaaaally wanted to love this one. I really liked that Samatar picked a mostly unknown tale, and I appreciated the style that she was going for. But Samatar meanders, loses her train of thought, and generally fails to live up to the story's potential.
Reflected - 1. The 'scientific' twist on the fairytale is just so lame. If you're going to use science, then at least provide the most basic veneer of scientific mumbo jumbo. The narrator and her friends just set up a bunch of mirrors in a lab. Big whoop.
Spinning Silver - 5. Look, Novick is at the top of her game here and she knows it. I am so excited for the novel-length version of this story. ( )
  miri12 | May 31, 2019 |
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» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Parisien, DominikEditorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Wolfe, NavahEditorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Anders, Charlie JaneContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bjorg, StellaIlustradorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
de Bodard, AlietteContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
El-Mohtar, AmalContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Ford, JeffreyContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Gladstone, MaxContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Goss, TheodoraContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Gregory, DarylContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Howard, KatContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Jones, Stephen GrahamContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Lanagan, MargoContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Liu, MarjorieContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
McGuire, SeananContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Nix, GarthContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Novik, NaomiContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Samatar, SofiaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Tidbeck, KarinContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Valente, Catherynne M.Contribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Valentine, GenevieveContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Carre, BenjaminArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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An all-new anthology of cross-genre fairy tale retellings, featuring an all-star lineup of award-winning and critically acclaimed writers. Once upon a time. It's how so many of our most beloved stories start. Fairy tales have dominated our cultural imagination for centuries. From the Brothers Grimm to the Countess d'Aulnoy, from Charles Perrault to Hans Christian Anderson, storytellers have crafted all sorts of tales that have always found a place in our hearts. Now a new generation of storytellers have taken up the mantle that the masters created and shaped their stories into something startling and electrifying. Packed with award-winning authors, this anthology explores an array of fairy tales in startling and innovative ways, in genres and settings both traditional and unusual, including science fiction, western, and post-apocalyptic as well as traditional fantasy and contemporary horror. From the woods to the stars, The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales takes readers on a journey at once unexpected and familiar, as a diverse group of writers explore some of our most beloved tales in new ways across genres and styles. Contains stories by: Charlie Jane Anders, Aliette de Bodard, Amal El-mohtar, Jeffrey Ford, Max Gladstone, Theodora Goss, Daryl Gregory, Kat Howard, Stephen Graham Jones, Margo Lanagan, Marjorie Liu, Seanan McGuire, Garth Nix, Naomi Novik, Sofia Samatar, Karin Tidbeck, Catherynne M. Valente, and Genevieve Valentine.

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