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The power por Naomi Alderman
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The power (edição 2016)

por Naomi Alderman

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,3042073,058 (3.76)276
'She throws her head back and pushes her chest forward and lets go a huge blast right into the centre of his body. The rivulets and streams of red scarring run across his chest and up around his throat. She'd put her hand on his heart and stopped him dead.'Suddenly - tomorrow or the day after - girls find that with a flick of their fingers, they can inflict agonizing pain and even death. With this single twist, the four lives at the heart of Naomi Alderman's extraordinary, visceral novel are utterly transformed, and we look at the world in an entirely new light.What if the power to hurt were in women's hands?… (mais)
Membro:Je9
Título:The power
Autores:Naomi Alderman
Informação:UK : Viking, 2016.
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

The Power por Naomi Alderman

Adicionado recentemente porBruyere_C, Redvelvetwithpeper, Rennie90, jamcnerney, RHagenson, biblioteca privada, balajiv20398, stancarey, kcollett
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» Ver também 276 menções

Inglês (205)  Espanhol (1)  Italiano (1)  Todas as línguas (207)
Mostrando 1-5 de 207 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I liked this. I enjoyed the premise of the novel and the sort of biblical tone a lot of it had. I think the framing device (a draft of a novel) allowed me to forgive any of the quibbles I had with characterization. ( )
  quenstalof | Nov 26, 2021 |
A bit violent for me. The writing was very good and the story well-told, but I was disappointed to see how power corrupts, even if women are in charge. ( )
  libq | Nov 10, 2021 |
Can Women Save the World?

With women the dominant sex, would the world be any different? The conclusion here seems to be no. The one sex, men here, would still be subordinate, rivalry and war would still exist, and people would wonder, as does a character in this novel, if the world would be a better place if men were in charge. More interesting, unfortunately, is the structure of the fully former new society than the race up to its birth, the subject of the novel.

In Naomi Adlerman’s 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize winning dystopian novel, a male writer named Neil solicits the opinion of the eponymous Naomi regarding his new work looking back five thousands years to the origin of the rise of women as the world’s dominant sex. He begins his telling ten years prior to the war that places women firmly in control. Neil focuses on four characters:

Roxy is the daughter of a ruthless British criminal gang leader, Bernie Monke, who eventually assumes control of the gang, putting her in direct rivalry with her treacherous father and a brother, Darrell. Allie is a disaffected American orphan shunted from foster home to foster home; she hears a voice (too glib by a measure) which guides her to become Mother Eve, the leader of a world-changing religious movement. Margot, a cunning and ambitious American politician, rises from city mayor to U.S. Senator to play a role in the great conflict that changes the world. Tunde is a Nigerian youth with journalistic ambitions, who becomes the first-hand chronicler of the revolution that sweeps the world. Included are an assortment of other characters, the most significant of whom is Tatiana Moskalev, head of a state, Bessapara, that breaks away from Moldova (sandwiched between Ukraine and Romania), which is reduced to the menacing North Moldova; these countries become the flashpoint for the world-altering gender switch.

The change begins with young girls; Roxy and Allie are both teens. They develop a muscular skein at the base of their necks that allows them to deliver an electrical charge of varying magnitude, ranging from titillating pleasure to deadly force, The Power. Naturally, the world, that is men, view this with alarm and try to analyze its origin with an eye to negating it. The teens gain control over their power and in time transfer it to older women. As women begin to understand their power, the world undergoes a violent change that begins in the most repressive parts of the world, the Middle East and India. As this starts happening, Allie escapes the clutches of her foster family, fleeing to a convent on the eastern coast of the U.S. There, with the help of the voice in her head, she establishes herself as Mother Eve, the spiritual leader of the great transformation. Roxy, by virtue of her power and criminal skill, assumes the leadership of the Monke gang, specializing in, among other things, drug running. Eventually, all these characters end up in Bessapara. Bessapara and North Moldova become the poxy states for the worldwide change.

The Power is a mix of speculative fiction, adventure, religious legerdemain, and war. Often it feels like a YA novel, mostly in tone and the superficial manner in which it treats what could be a more thoughtful exploration of gender roles and suppression. However, because it is filled with violence against both men and women perpetrated against each other, much of it sexual, it is not something the very young or sensitive would find comfortable reading. While the idea does intrigue, perhaps it would have worked better with more focus on the fully formed society of the future rather than the machinations leading up to its birth, more in line with Margaret Atwood’s (a supporter of this novel) masterful creation of Gilead in The Handmaid’s Tale.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Can Women Save the World?

With women the dominant sex, would the world be any different? The conclusion here seems to be no. The one sex, men here, would still be subordinate, rivalry and war would still exist, and people would wonder, as does a character in this novel, if the world would be a better place if men were in charge. More interesting, unfortunately, is the structure of the fully former new society than the race up to its birth, the subject of the novel.

In Naomi Adlerman’s 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize winning dystopian novel, a male writer named Neil solicits the opinion of the eponymous Naomi regarding his new work looking back five thousands years to the origin of the rise of women as the world’s dominant sex. He begins his telling ten years prior to the war that places women firmly in control. Neil focuses on four characters:

Roxy is the daughter of a ruthless British criminal gang leader, Bernie Monke, who eventually assumes control of the gang, putting her in direct rivalry with her treacherous father and a brother, Darrell. Allie is a disaffected American orphan shunted from foster home to foster home; she hears a voice (too glib by a measure) which guides her to become Mother Eve, the leader of a world-changing religious movement. Margot, a cunning and ambitious American politician, rises from city mayor to U.S. Senator to play a role in the great conflict that changes the world. Tunde is a Nigerian youth with journalistic ambitions, who becomes the first-hand chronicler of the revolution that sweeps the world. Included are an assortment of other characters, the most significant of whom is Tatiana Moskalev, head of a state, Bessapara, that breaks away from Moldova (sandwiched between Ukraine and Romania), which is reduced to the menacing North Moldova; these countries become the flashpoint for the world-altering gender switch.

The change begins with young girls; Roxy and Allie are both teens. They develop a muscular skein at the base of their necks that allows them to deliver an electrical charge of varying magnitude, ranging from titillating pleasure to deadly force, The Power. Naturally, the world, that is men, view this with alarm and try to analyze its origin with an eye to negating it. The teens gain control over their power and in time transfer it to older women. As women begin to understand their power, the world undergoes a violent change that begins in the most repressive parts of the world, the Middle East and India. As this starts happening, Allie escapes the clutches of her foster family, fleeing to a convent on the eastern coast of the U.S. There, with the help of the voice in her head, she establishes herself as Mother Eve, the spiritual leader of the great transformation. Roxy, by virtue of her power and criminal skill, assumes the leadership of the Monke gang, specializing in, among other things, drug running. Eventually, all these characters end up in Bessapara. Bessapara and North Moldova become the poxy states for the worldwide change.

The Power is a mix of speculative fiction, adventure, religious legerdemain, and war. Often it feels like a YA novel, mostly in tone and the superficial manner in which it treats what could be a more thoughtful exploration of gender roles and suppression. However, because it is filled with violence against both men and women perpetrated against each other, much of it sexual, it is not something the very young or sensitive would find comfortable reading. While the idea does intrigue, perhaps it would have worked better with more focus on the fully formed society of the future rather than the machinations leading up to its birth, more in line with Margaret Atwood’s (a supporter of this novel) masterful creation of Gilead in The Handmaid’s Tale.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Lots to think about here. Once I reached the end, I started over again at the beginning. From the very start, "Men Writers" makes more sense, and other things do, too. I don't like to think that power intrinsically makes people unfair and cruel, but this book certainly points that way. The author's note at the end is fascinating, especially that bit about the real artifacts. ( )
  CMOBrien | Oct 18, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 207 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Alderman [...] imagines our present moment — with our history, our wars, our gender politics — complicated by the sudden widespread manifestation of “electrostatic power” in women. Young girls wake up one morning with the ability to generate powerful electric shocks from their bodies, having developed specialized muscles — called “skeins” — at their collarbones, which they can flex to deliver anything from mild stings to lethal jolts of electricity. The power varies in its intensity but is almost uniform in its distribution to anyone with two X chromosomes, and women vary in their capacity to control and direct it, but the result is still a vast, systemic upheaval of gender dynamics across the globe.
adicionada por melmore | editarThe New York Times, Amal El-Mohtar (Oct 25, 2017)
 
Alderman has written our era's "Handmaid's Tale," and, like Margaret Atwood's classic, "The Power" is one of those essential feminist works that terrifies and illuminates, enrages and encourages.
adicionada por melmore | editarWashinton Post, Ron Charles (Oct 10, 2017)
 
The novel is constructed as a big, brash, page-turning, drug-running, globetrotting thriller, one in which people say things such as: “It’s only you I’ve blimmin come to find, isn’t it?” and “You wanna stand with me? Or you wanna stand against me?” But it’s also endlessly nuanced and thought-provoking, combining elegantly efficient prose with beautiful meditations on the metaphysics of power, possibility and change.
adicionada por melmore | editarThe Guardian (UK), Justine Jordan (Nov 2, 2016)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (18 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Naomi Aldermanautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Andoh, AdjoaNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bre, SilviaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Burton, NathanDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stoddard, JustineFotógrafoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Thiele, SabineTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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The people came to Samuel and said: Place a King over us, to guide us.

And Samuel said to them: This is what a King will do if he reigns over you: he’ll take your sons and make them run with his chariots and horses. He’ll dispose them however he wants: he’ll make them commanders of thousands or captains of fifties, he’ll send them to plough, to reap, to forge his weapons and his chariots. He’ll take your daughters to make perfume for him, or cook his food or do his baking. He’ll take your fields and your vineyards and your olive groves – oh, he’ll take the very best of those and give them to his cronies. He’ll take much more. A tenth of your grain and your wine – those will go to his favourite aristocrats and faithful servants. Your manservants and your maidservants, your best men, your donkeys – yes, he’ll take those for his own use. He’ll take one tenth of your flocks and you yourselves will become his slaves. On that day, believe me, you will cry out for relief from this King, the King you asked for, but the Lord will not answer you on that day.

But the people would not listen to Samuel. They said: No. Give us a King over us. So that we can be like all the other nations. Give us a King to guide us and lead us into battle.

When Samuel heard what the people said, he told it to the Lord.

The Lord answered, Give them a King.

1 Samuel 8
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For Margaret and for Graeme, who have shown me wonders
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Dear Naomi,
I've finished the bloody book.
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'She throws her head back and pushes her chest forward and lets go a huge blast right into the centre of his body. The rivulets and streams of red scarring run across his chest and up around his throat. She'd put her hand on his heart and stopped him dead.'Suddenly - tomorrow or the day after - girls find that with a flick of their fingers, they can inflict agonizing pain and even death. With this single twist, the four lives at the heart of Naomi Alderman's extraordinary, visceral novel are utterly transformed, and we look at the world in an entirely new light.What if the power to hurt were in women's hands?

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