Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage…
A carregar...

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI (edição 2018)

por David Grann (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,3342072,990 (4.07)263
Presents a true account of the early twentieth-century murders of dozens of wealthy Osage and law-enforcement officials, citing the contributions and missteps of a fledgling FBI that eventually uncovered one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West--where oilmen like J.P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the "Phantom Terror," roamed--many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization's first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.… (mais)
Membro:spisaacs
Título:Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
Autores:David Grann (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2018), Edition: Illustrated, 400 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

Pormenores da obra

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI por David Grann

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 263 menções

Inglês (205)  Francês (2)  Todas as línguas (207)
Mostrando 1-5 de 207 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A really interesting mix of a true crime story and a history story. This may start off a little slow for some but it picks up very quickly. It's a fairly short read, the book itself is about 290 pages and is super easy to get through. there was less about the birth of the FBI than I thought there would be but I was okay with that because the rest of it was so engaging. Native American history so frequently gets swept under the rug so it was great to be able to read about the Osage people, even if this was set during a horrible time in their history. I definitely want to pick up some of the authors other work. ( )
  AKBouterse | Oct 14, 2021 |
Grann's book is a disconcerting look at the evil in humanity. It covers a previously forgotten and shameful era in U.S. history.

When the Osage Nation began to earn riches from the mineral rights to their land after oil was discovered there, they became magnets for predators looking for easy pickings. Many thought nothing of killing these people for their money. Corrupt officials, politicians, doctors, lawyers, bankers, and criminals helped cover up the crimes.

Finally, the Federal government got involved and solved the case, and ended the murders. Or did they?

The book ends with a look at the barren prairie, still filled with ghosts from the past. The emptiness seems to represent the soul of a people who could tolerate and cover up such horror.

( )
  Library_Lin | Oct 4, 2021 |
As someone who hardly reads true crime or even fiction mystery books, this is not the kind of book you would expect me to read. Killers of the Yellow Moon is also a couple of years old, so I can’t say it was even on my radar. But this is the end of a decade and we keep seeing all the “Best of” lists for the past 10 years, and when I saw this book on one of the best non fiction of the decade lists, I did some research and instantly became interested. And obviously getting to know that casting calls have gone out for a movie adaptation by Martin Scorcese starring Leonardo Dicaprio and Robert DeNiro made it the next book on my TBR.

I recently read a history book called How to Hide an Empire and it was revelatory in how much we don’t know about the past or even present of our own country. And this book may just be dealing with a small time period of the early 20th century, but it’s a matter of shame that it’s been forgotten within just a century, despite the people and the descendants who lived through the Reign of Terror still dealing with the ramifications even now. It really is preposterous and obviously the result of prejudice that FBI remains in the public eye as the highly acclaimed national law enforcement agency in the country, but the string of brutal murders, cover ups and rampant systemic corruption that led to the birth of this organization is neither taught as an important part of history, or even remains in anyone’s memory. Even I’ve read quite a bit about Edgar Hoover and how he created and ruled the organization with an iron fist, but this case that he essentially used to publicize the importance of his agency never made it into my readings, probably because it wasn’t deemed noteworthy.

The author writes the book like a mystery novel but with a bit of history, giving us the background for how the Osage Nation in Oklahoma came to be and the extraordinary work of their diligent representatives who managed to get them the mineral rights for their lands. Oil brought money and prosperity to the Osage Indians, but much pronounced is the bigotry among the white people and the government who couldn’t bear to see people who they felt were inferior living such prosperous lives. And it’s fairly obvious that from this prejudice (and we can call it jealousy and greed) came the Reign of Terror that lasted years and ended with scores of murders.

The author details the arrival of Tom White and his team of bureau officers, who took up the mantle of this investigation after many locals failed to do anything, and it was gratifying to see atleast some white people with a fair amount of power willing to do their duty and not discount the lives that were lost or those who were living in constant danger. The conspiracy that they unearth is massive and I think it was sheer persistence on their part, and the resilience of the Osage Indians that ultimately led to bringing the truth to light.

But it was the last part of the book that really stunned me, when the author talks about how he started his research and what he uncovered. With the access of many more documents from decades ago and testimonies from the living descendants of the victims, he pieces together an almost unimaginable tale of conspiracy - where local white businessmen, dangerous outlaws, reputable doctors, corrupt local sheriffs and law enforcement and government officials, and most importantly greedy white people - all formed an informal network of killers, masters of coverups and large scale robbers, leaving numerous families with death and destitution. And the worst part is that while Tom White and his team was able to get convictions for a few murders, many many others were never pursued, and generations of their families have struggled to piece together the truth of what happened to their loved ones - and they are still doing it today.

It’s always both fascinating and painful to read such historical accounts and see parallels in our current times, because it just shows that despite a lot of progress we have made, we haven’t really in many other matters. Rachel Maddow’s recent book Blowout talks about the huge tentacles of the Oil industry in Oklahoma and how long it took for ordinary people to be able to fight back, and what they lost in the meantime. And it’s just testimony that the resource curse is alive and well, the unscrupulous and ruthless nature of people clamoring for oil money hasn’t changed; it just probably has evolved from murders to more sophisticated business operations. Another thing that was brutal to read about was how some of the killers who were convicted of the Osage murders got paroled very soon, and even got pardons from the governors - just showcasing how less (or no) value this country places on the lives of nonwhite people - eerily similar to the president’s pardons of war criminals a few days ago.

No thanks to the establishment of this country, it’s through sheer will and resilience and deep rooted love of their history that has managed to sustain the existence of the Osage Nation, and it was an honor to get to know about some of the people that the author had an opportunity to meet. This book is the story of the terror through which they lived and survived, and some law enforcement officers who took their duty seriously. If you like reading historical accounts of true crime, you just can’t miss this book. It’s brilliantly written and thoroughly researched, bringing a vital part of forgotten history back into the consciousness. The only heartbreak is that so much of it is still unknown and the families may never know the truth. ( )
  ksahitya1987 | Aug 20, 2021 |
Not nearly as good as LOST CITY OF Z. An interesting tale and an incredible feat of historical research, but not very interestingly constructed, and with an overwhelming number of characters. A great 5-10,000 word article. I didn't need to read a full book on the topic. ( )
  wordloversf | Aug 14, 2021 |
Most of us have heard stories of how​, hundreds of years ago,​ Native Americans ​had been mistreated by soldiers, settlers, or the government. ​As settlers pushed west, Native Americans ended up being forced from their traditional lands, or worse. ​Even when treaties were signed between the Indian Nations and the Federal Government, settlers and prospectors often ignored the agreements, and time after time, the government failed to uphold the terms of the treaties. Inevitably, Indian tribes were removed from their lands, and forced onto the least desireable regions of the States and Territories.

​We tend to think of this as "old history" or unfortunate mistakes of the past --- things which ended long ago. ​And then a book like David Grann's "Killers of the Flower Moon" is published, reminding us that mistreatment of the less privileged by those in power is not such ancient history.

Grann tells the story of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. Once controlling vast areas of the American west, they were forced onto a small region in Oklahoma ​on lands ​which were u​n​suitable for agriculture or ranching. But early in the 20th Century, vast oil deposits were discovered on the lands given to them by the U.S. Government, and ​almost overnight, ​they became among the richest peoples per capita in the world.

​Vast wealth controlled by a weak minority is a recipe for abuse, and that's an understatement in this case. It wasn't long before unscrupulous and powerful people conspired to take control of the oil wealth. What couldn't be essentially stolen from the Osage by means of deception was taken by force. The Osage Indians were already at the mercy of U.S. courts, judges, lawmen, bankers, lawyers, and a system rigged against them. And if having a rigged system at their disposal didn't allow the powerful white men to seize the oil wealth, mineral rights were simply taken by killing the rightful owners.

The book tells the stories of a number of Osage tribe members, and how many of them were shot or poisoned. Anyone asking questions into these deaths was also in jeopardy of being killed. Soon, the number of murdered people reached dozens, but no one was charged with the murders. Eventually, the newly created Federal Bureau of Investigation took control of the investigation, ultimately bringing charges and obtaining a conviction of several suspects. Unfortunately, once the first convictions were obtained, further investigations ended. And as Grann points out, it's quite possible that a number of other murders were committed people never identified. It's a sad story of abuse of minorities by the powerful. As the book jacket states, "Killers of the Flower Moon" is utterly riveting, but also emotionally devastating.
( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 207 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
De maand van de bloemendoder is een fascinerend en tegelijkertijd gruwelijk boek over de moordpartijen, discriminatie en uitbuiting van Osage indianen aan het begin van de 20e eeuw in Oklahoma. Nadat de Osage, zoals zoveel indianen in de Verenigde Staten, waren verjaagd naar een reservaat in Oklahoma, bleek hier olie gevonden te worden. Hierdoor werden de Osage opeens rijk. Echter dit betekende ook uitbuiting, discriminatie en vele moordpartijen. David Grann is jarenlang bezig geweest met onderzoek naar misstanden die plaatsvonden en De maand van de bloemendoder is het zeer boeiende eindresultaat hiervan...lees verder >
 

» Adicionar outros autores (5 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
David Grannautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Campbell, DannyNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carella, MariaDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dedekind, HenningTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fontana, JohnDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gay, CyrilTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lee, Anne MarieNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Patton, WillNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Strömberg, RagnarTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ward, Jeffrey L.Cartographerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
There had been no evil to mar that propitious night, because she had listened; there had been no voice of evil; no screech owl had quaveringly disturbed the stillness. She knew this because she had listened all night.
--John Joseph Mathews, Sundown
A conspiracy is everything that ordinary life is not. It's the inside game, cold, sure, undistracted, forever closed off to us. We are the flawed ones, the innocents, trying to make some rough sense of the daily jostle. Conspirators have a logic and a daring beyond our reach. All conspiracies are the same taut story of men who find coherence in some criminal act.  ---Don DeLillo, Libra
We have a few mouth-to-mouth tales; we exhume from old trunks and boxes and drawers letters without salutation or signature, in which men and women who once lived and breathed are now merely initials or nicknames out of some now incomprehensible affection which sound to us like Sanskrit or Chocktaw; we see dimly people, the people in whose living blood and seed we ourselves lay dormant and waiting, in this shadowy attenuation of time possessing now heroic proportions performing their acts of simple passion and simple violence, impervious to time and inexplicable. ---William Faulker, Absalom, Absalom!
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For my mom and dad
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In April, millions of tiny flowers spread over the blackjack hills and vast prairies in the Osage territory of Oklahoma.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Page 141
Perhaps because he witnessed this—and other executions—or perhaps because he had seen the effect of the ordeal on his father, or perhaps because he feared the system could doom an innocent man, Tom grew to oppose what was then sometimes called “judicial homicide.” And he came to see the law as a struggle to subdue the violent passions not only in others but also in oneself.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Presents a true account of the early twentieth-century murders of dozens of wealthy Osage and law-enforcement officials, citing the contributions and missteps of a fledgling FBI that eventually uncovered one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West--where oilmen like J.P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the "Phantom Terror," roamed--many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization's first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.07)
0.5
1 4
1.5
2 19
2.5 6
3 131
3.5 82
4 384
4.5 63
5 270

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 163,166,118 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível