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Bright Air Black por David Vann (author)
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Bright Air Black (edição 2017)

por David Vann (author) (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
928230,092 (3.37)2
"Following the success of Aquarium which was a New York Times Editor's Choice and garnered numerous rave reviews, David Vann transports us to 13th century B.C. to give a nuanced and electric portrait of the life of one of ancient mythology's most fascinating and notorious women, Medea. In brilliant poetic prose Bright Air Black brings us aboard the ship Argo for its epic return journey across the Black Sea from Persia's Colchis--where Medea flees her home and father with Jason, the Argonauts, and the Golden Fleece. Vann's reimagining of this ancient tale offers a thrilling, realist alternative to the long held notions of Medea as monster or sorceress. We witness with dramatic urgency Medea's humanity, her Bronze Age roots and position in Greek society, her love affair with Jason, and her tragic demise. Atmospheric and spellbinding, Bright Air Black is an indispensable, fresh and provocative take on one of our earliest texts and the most intimate and corporal version of Medea's story ever told"--… (mais)
Membro:poingu
Título:Bright Air Black
Autores:David Vann (author) (Autor)
Informação:Heinemann (2017)
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:2017, male-identified-authors

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Bright Air Black: A Novel por David Vann

Adicionado recentemente porWXC89, WXC789, wxc777, marionafb4
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Mostrando 1-5 de 8 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Thanks to Netgalley for this ARC!

I knew I was going to get a retelling of Medea from her point of view during the quest of The Golden Fleece and after, with Jason, but I wasn't quite prepared for just how beautiful the lines of the text were. I mean, getting it all from the PoV of Medea was a pretty awesome treat, all by itself, and found myself fully in her camp despite all the awful things she does, but what really caught my attention, even more, was the prose.

This is some true mythopoetical realism, yo.

I will admit that there were some parts during the first half of the text that could have been improved, at least making the text more accessible those who haven't studied up on the old legends and the plays, for so much of the action has already happened right when the prose opens up. I'm not going to complain too much, however, because even though it assumes the audience is conversant with the legend, it doesn't really matter after a certain amount of time.

Yes, we know Medea is a bad-ass, willing to tear the world down to prevent her slide into slavery. She's a beast willing to rend to keep herself out of chains.

I particularly love how the author managed to turn someone like this into a heroic figure even more than half the time, and even when she's doing her most evil deeds, I feel for her and want to cheer her on.

That's a real feat.

Is this niche? Or does this have all the feel of Big Magical Realism for Mainstream? I don't know, but it could certainly go either way. :) I enjoyed it very much, too.

Update 2/3/17:

After some deep reflection, I had to change the rating from a four to a five star. The language keeps with me after all this time and the shape of the story keeps getting better. The aftertaste, so to speak. :)

It has NOTHING (much) to do with complaints from other reviewers (Trish). I do this on my own (mostly). ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Bright Air Black requires and rewards rapt attention. Like every other Vann novel the writing is a unique mix of poetry and viscera. There is really no one else who writes like this. There is no one else who could have so deeply imagined Medea murdering her brother on the deck of Jason's ship, as she flees with Jason from her father's wrath. The moment where she cuts her brother's throat, which she does without hesitation but while looking into his eyes, loving him, is moving and also very disturbing. Chapters later she scrapes her brother's remains from where they have congealed on the deck, and Vann's meticulous care in describing this scene would be remarkable all on its own, but these scenes and their remarkableness just keep coming, one following another.

I don't think the style is similar but in its revivification of an ancient and familiar story it reminds me of [b:The Gospel According to Jesus Christ|28859|The Gospel According to Jesus Christ|José Saramago|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1519393758s/28859.jpg|2338253] by Saramago. ( )
  poingu | Feb 23, 2020 |
Qui ne connait pas Jason et sa quête de la toison d'or, mais qui connait réellement Médée et sa destinée ?
Nous suivons Médée et Jason dans leur fuite après le vol de la toison d'or, Médée avide de pouvoir, rêvant d'être "roi" comme l'égyptienne Hatchepsout.
Pouvoir, manipulation, meurtres, invocation des dieux tout y passe pour accéder au pouvoir.
Un mythe revisité avec brio et une écriture à être déclamée au lieu d'être lue. ( )
  coriala | Mar 17, 2018 |
Before reading this book, I knew nothing about Medea or Jason and the Argonauts. In fact, I did a quick Wikipedia search into the origins of these characters before delving into this book so that I could properly understand the content.

It definitely helped that I had a little background on the story before beginning this book because this novel starts at the point when Medea is on Jason's ship, running away from her father. The story doesn't really delve too much into the events that preceded this but you eventually do find out as you continue reading. Apart from that, the story is quite indepth in terms of storyline, giving a great amount of detail into the way the journey progresses. Having never read anything about Medea or Jason, I found the story fascinating. There was never a dull moment and with each page comes more violence, brutality, and treachery. If you have never heard of Medea, then you need to read this book and get to know her story!

Medea's character..... was incredible. She is strong, ruthless, intelligent, and determined in a way that no other female protagonist I have each very read about has been. When she spoke, she voiced the thoughts of countless women over countless generations. She is the epitome of the struggles of a woman who does not fit into the mold created by men. In short, I loved her. She was violent and lacked mercy and yet shred he managed to exude femininity while acting completely unfeminine (according to our views on what a feminine person is typically like). I cannot stress enough how well the author portrayed her and how mesmerized I was by her strength. She is definitely one badass female protagonist, even if I don't support all of her violent actions.

At first, the writing style seemed unusual to me. It's poetic but not in the typical way. It made me take note of every word being used, every transition being made. This was a beautifully written story and it demanded that you pay attention attention appreciate that beauty.

For more reviews, visit: www.veereading.wordpress.com ( )
  veeshee | Jan 29, 2018 |
Myth is bloody business.

Bright Air Black is a retelling of parts of Jason and the Argonauts, from the point of view of Medea. It is….poetic…grisly…tragicomic…eerie…chilling at times.

And although it allegedly weighs in at 288 pages, I read it at a sitting on the plane and it felt like a novella.

Bright Air Black is lyrical and utterly immersive. The opening pages made the hair stand up on the back of my neck. It begs for a soundtrack. So I’ve made one. Go ahead and push the play button on this, then continue reading this post, or the book itself.

https://open.spotify.com/user/viking2917/playlist/6n1yqisHGZLuw0WVrQT9hY

Myth is a bloody business. As the book opens, Medea clinically butchers her brother as she sails away from her father with Jason, throwing the pieces overboard, so that her father must stop to pick up what is left of her brother. Later when she convinces King Pelias’ daughters to dismember him and throw him in the cauldron to be reborn a new — or not. Finally, as her children pay the price for being born to a faithless father and a distraught mother.

Medea is thoughtful, loyal, ambitious…. and taken with Jason. For reasons she herself cannot quite articulate. She escapes with him, from her father, to return and be a queen. And to be disappointed.

Jason is, well, in this portrayal he seems like a dumb jock who doesn’t know what’s good for him. Leader of a pack of semi-heroes.

As the book opens, you will be whisked away to a world not your own. Where the gods are real and terrible.

There must be at least one god not filled with rage. Medea closes her eyes and tries to remember, but every image, every name that comes is feared. She hasn’t understood this until now, that rage is god, every weather god, every elemental, all that rise from the earth, all that come from death, all with a will to destroy. Worship a form of fear and perhaps nothing more, but how can that be?… Rage that inescapable and human.

Where simple sails take on a life of their own.

The sail no inanimate thing. Terrible in high wind, rigid and merciless and powerful beyond imagining, a thing of fear and will. But even now, in lighter winds, filled with desire, a restlessness, capable even of regret and sorry, falling along an edge, hunching down, refilling but not entirely some cost to the past. Only in no air, when it hangs fully slack, does it seem like linen. At all other times, this is impossible to believe.

A retelling of Jason and the Argonauts from Medea’s point of view, we see Jason as a faithless husband, a feckless hero, and Medea the woman scorned. The writing is all water and light and rage and blood and hate and stupidity, the gravitas of the writing equal to the depth of its mythical subject matter. If you are in the mood for deep myth, you won’t be disappointed.
  viking2917 | Nov 21, 2017 |
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"Following the success of Aquarium which was a New York Times Editor's Choice and garnered numerous rave reviews, David Vann transports us to 13th century B.C. to give a nuanced and electric portrait of the life of one of ancient mythology's most fascinating and notorious women, Medea. In brilliant poetic prose Bright Air Black brings us aboard the ship Argo for its epic return journey across the Black Sea from Persia's Colchis--where Medea flees her home and father with Jason, the Argonauts, and the Golden Fleece. Vann's reimagining of this ancient tale offers a thrilling, realist alternative to the long held notions of Medea as monster or sorceress. We witness with dramatic urgency Medea's humanity, her Bronze Age roots and position in Greek society, her love affair with Jason, and her tragic demise. Atmospheric and spellbinding, Bright Air Black is an indispensable, fresh and provocative take on one of our earliest texts and the most intimate and corporal version of Medea's story ever told"--

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