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Black Like Me (50th Anniversary Edition) por…
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Black Like Me (50th Anniversary Edition) (original 1960; edição 2010)

por John Howard Griffin, Robert Bonazzi (Posfácio)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,644672,564 (3.98)99
Publisher's description: Studs Terkel tells us in his Foreword to the definitive Griffin Estate Edition of Black Like Me: "This is a contemporary book, you bet." Indeed, Black Like Me remains required reading in thousands of high schools and colleges for this very reason. Regardless of how much progress has been made in eliminating outright racism from American life, Black Like Me endures as a great human and humanitarian document. In our era, when "international" terrorism is most often defined in terms of a single ethnic designation and a single religion, we need to be reminded that America has been blinded by fear and racial intolerance before. As John Lennon wrote, "Living is easy with eyes closed." Black Like Me is the story of a man who opened his eyes, and helped an entire nation to do likewise.… (mais)
Membro:PalmTreePundit
Título:Black Like Me (50th Anniversary Edition)
Autores:John Howard Griffin
Outros autores:Robert Bonazzi (Posfácio)
Informação:Signet (2010), Edition: 50 Anv, Paperback, 208 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Black Like Me por John Howard Griffin (1960)

  1. 10
    The magnolia jungle; the life, times, and education of a southern editor por P. D. East (Cecrow)
  2. 10
    Lowest of the Low por Günter Wallraff (edwinbcn)
    edwinbcn: Similar partcicipating observation large scale undercover operations, disclosing racism in Europe and the US, respectively. Classic studies with a huge impact.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 67 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Black Like Me tells the story of a famous social experiment: in 1959, with Jim Crow laws still in effect, a white writer manages to darken his skin and travel throughout the Deep South as a black man. As such he encounters both irrational prejudice and the occasional kindness, but much more of the former than the latter. If Griffin is exactly the same person on the inside, whether his skin is white or black, why should such a superficial characteristic dictate how others treat him?

This exposé is a fascinating study in the sociology and psychology of racism. I was surprised at the ease with which Griffin was able to adopt a black persona and wonder why no one saw through his disguise. Although some commenters have called this narrative dated, I found that unfortunately, many of Griffin’s observations (especially regarding the thought processes of white supremacists) still hold true today. ( )
  akblanchard | Feb 3, 2021 |
"The negro. The South. These are the details. The real story is the universal one of men who destroy the souls and bodies of other men (and in the process destroy themselves) for reasons neither really understands. It is the story of the persecuted, the defrauded, the feared and detested. I could have been a Jew in Germany, a Mexican in a number of states, or a member of any "inferior" group. Only the details would have differed. The story would be the same." (from the preface)
  CSUC | Jan 13, 2021 |
I read this book many years ago, as a young teenager, and was gripped by the danger that John Howard Griffin voluntarily placed himself in, in order to discover what racism was really like. By dying his skin and making other changes, he "passed" as an African-American in the South. (He later died from side effects caused by the pills he took to help darken his skin.) This book broke many barriers and enlightened many (white) people to the true evil of segregation and racism. Sadly, it is not too late to read it and learn. ( )
  AnaraGuard | Nov 1, 2020 |
Anxiety provoking. Took guts, that’s for sure. And, it’s stunning how little has changed sixty years down the line. ( )
  shaundeane | Sep 13, 2020 |
White writer darkens his skin and assumes the identity of a black man in the Deep South circa 1959. With an open sensibility and a novelist’s skill, Griffin constructs poignant set pieces, conjures the sights, sounds and smells of a constrained world, and puts a pointed stick to the rotten underbelly of the human condition.

The distance between white and black, writes Griffin, was ‘an area of unknowing.’ The white man could carry on with his life and never give thought to a black man, much less consider how he lived and survived, where he ate or where he slept or what his family was like. The black man could not afford to be ignorant of the white man’s ways. The black man’s concern was how to get along with the white man, how to hold his own and raise himself in the esteem of the white man ‘without for a moment letting him think he had any god-given rights that we did not also have.’ For the black man, day-to-day living was a reminder of his inferior status—'the polite rebuffs when he seeks better employment, hearing himself referred to as a coon or jigaboo, having to bypass available restroom facilities or eating facilities to find one specified for him.’

His only salvation from complete despair lies in his belief, the old belief of his forefathers, that these things are not directed at him personally, but against his race, his pigmentation. His mother or aunt long ago prepared him, explaining that he as an individual can live in dignity, even though he as a Negro cannot.

Griffin goes far enough under cover to become attuned to the unspoken signals and gestures and looks of clandestine commiseration among blacks. ‘Geniality among one’s own was a kind of buffer against an invisible but ever-present threat.’ He even occasionally dreams like a black man, of suffocating hatred, of being chased, of being just at the threshold of some terrible danger. He feels his own face has lost expressiveness; his mind ‘dozes empty for long periods, trying to cushion the dread.’

Griffin does not condemn all white people, but he responds with inward surprise at the few he encounters who do not impulsively demean or dismiss him—the lady at the Catholic bookstore who cashes his traveler’s check, or the military officer at the bus station who does not jump ahead of him in the queue. Most revealing of the attitudes and actions of whites is their hypocrisy—the outcries against ‘mongrelization’ along with the sexual violence committed against young black women, the grotesque transformation in the faces of the white women leaving church on Sunday morning when suddenly catching sight of a black man passing on the sidewalk. The black man sees the casual cruelty of bigots in ‘the honorable South,’ the way they take pleasure in causing pain and humiliation, and he hears them say that it is the blacks’ immorality that keeps them from receiving the benefits of freedom, and sometimes he feels pity.

Griffin makes his way from New Orleans to Biloxi to Montgomery, where he is struck by the different atmosphere of a place where blacks have organized nonviolent and prayerful resistance to racial discrimination. Such resistance bewilders and angers the white racist, writes Griffin, ‘because the dignity of the Negro’s course of action emphasizes the indignity of his own.’ The white man needles and taunts and challenges the black man in the hope that he will strike out and so justify further violent repression.

Black Like Me is sometimes hard to read and feel and so cannot be passed through lightly. Griffin lived to tell, and he told it well, his insights precise and evocative of the parochial but also universal, at a time when much of white America had little idea of what he was on about. ( )
  HectorSwell | May 11, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 67 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A stinging indictment of thoughtless, needless inhumanity. No one can read it without suffering.
adicionada por ArrowStead | editarThe Dallas Morning News
 
Essential reading...a social document of the first order, providing material absolutely unavailable elsewhere with such authenticity that it canot be dismissed.
adicionada por ArrowStead | editarSan Francisco Chronicle
 

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
John Howard Griffinautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Bonazzi, RobertPosfácioautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Rutledge, DonFotógrafoautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Terkel, StudsPrefácioautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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Rest at pale evening... A tall slim tree... Night coming tenderly... Black like me. --From "Dream Variation" Langston Hughes
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"This may not be all of it. It may not cover all of the questions, but it is what it is like to be a Negro in a land where we keep the Negro down." - preface
"For years the idea had haunted me, and that night it returned more insistently than ever."
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"The most obscene figures are not the ignorant ranting racists, but the legal minds who front for them, who invent for them the legislative proposals and the propoganda bulletins. They deliberately choose to foster distortions, always under the guise of patriotism, upon a people who have no means of checking the facts."
"He cannot understand how the white man can show the most demeaning aspects of his nature and at the same time delude himself into thinking he is inherently superior."
"I learned within a very few hours that no one was judging me by my qualities as a human individual and everyone was judging me by my pigment."
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Publisher's description: Studs Terkel tells us in his Foreword to the definitive Griffin Estate Edition of Black Like Me: "This is a contemporary book, you bet." Indeed, Black Like Me remains required reading in thousands of high schools and colleges for this very reason. Regardless of how much progress has been made in eliminating outright racism from American life, Black Like Me endures as a great human and humanitarian document. In our era, when "international" terrorism is most often defined in terms of a single ethnic designation and a single religion, we need to be reminded that America has been blinded by fear and racial intolerance before. As John Lennon wrote, "Living is easy with eyes closed." Black Like Me is the story of a man who opened his eyes, and helped an entire nation to do likewise.

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