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Ghachar Ghochar por Vivek Shanbhag and…
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Ghachar Ghochar (original 2013; edição 2016)

por Vivek Shanbhag and Srinath Perur (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3231763,116 (3.8)44
For readers of Akhil Sharma, Mohsin Hamid, and Teju Cole, a haunting novel about an upwardly mobile family splintered by success in rapidly changing India. "It's true what they say--it's not we who control money, it's the money that controls us." In this masterful novel by the acclaimed Indian writer Vivek Shanbhag, a close-knit family is delivered from near-destitution to sudden wealth after the narrator's uncle founds a successful spice company. As the narrator--a sensitive young man who is never named--his sister, his parents, and his uncle move from a cramped, ant-infested shack to a larger house and begin to grow accustomed to their newfound wealth, the family dynamics begin to shift. Allegiances and desires realign; marriages are arranged and begin to falter; and conflict brews ominously in the background. Things begin to become "ghachar ghochar"--a nonsense phrase that, to the narrator, comes to mean something entangled beyond repair. Told in clean, urgent prose, and punctuated by moments of unexpected warmth and humor, Ghachar Ghochar is a quietly enthralling, deeply unsettling novel about the shifting meanings--and consequences--of financial gain in contemporary India"--… (mais)
Membro:Emma76260
Título:Ghachar Ghochar
Autores:Vivek Shanbhag and Srinath Perur (Autor)
Informação:HARPER PERENNIAL (2016)
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Ghachar Ghochar por Vivek Shanbhag (2013)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 17 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The way the author set up the story with all its intricacies amazed me. Being an Indian myself, certain things were quite relatable. But, even if one weren't Indian, it shouldn't be a problem understanding because Shanbhag has explained it succinctly with the text. This is a story of how the family dynamics changes when they become rich overnight, of how they change individually as a person (or is it just their suppressed characteristics that came out after gaining wealth?), of the lengths that they go to preserve "family stability," and of the new family addition that threatens to disrupt the stability that hangs by the hair. As more of the protagonist's story unfolds, a sense of dread/restlessness slowly builds, which peaks at the last line of the book, leaving you shocked as you try to make sense of what was being implied (or not).

The translation is brilliant, one of the few good ones I have ever read. It flowed brilliantly and at places I wondered if this was indeed translated or was the original work. ( )
  PrasannaS | Nov 12, 2020 |
Sometimes the shortest books with the sparest words say the most. This book, set in contemporary India as it modernizes and becomes more economically competitive centers on one family over a short period of time, but covers multiple issues and moral quandaries. The narrator, an unnamed young man whose ambivalence is frightening tries to sort out how he came to be where he is: “ghachar-ghochar” a made-up word that means “in a knot, tangled up without release.” He explains “ours is a joint family” living under one roof: his emasculated father, his strong mother, his young-ish uncle (Chikkappa) whose business acumen has changed the family’s fortune from poverty to riches, through questionable means, his divorced sister Malata, and his new wife Anita who doesn’t fully understand the Family dynamic centered on the uncle. The rapid rise to riches has changed everyone’s moral compass, though Anita sometimes challenges this. The narrator now seeks his guidance from a waiter at Coffee House. Women’s issues come into play as does the respect due elders and tradition, and the idea of economic independence. The author has presented the basic outline of the plot and the reader is left to sort out the knot, especially the ambiguous ending. He states: “Words, after all are nothing by themselves. They burst into meaning only in the minds they’ve entered.” (5) Reminded me of Kafka’s Metamorphosis, though less dramatic, and Lessing’s Fifth Child. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
Author has beautifully translated the kannada book into english. This book is about a family of 6 people. Narrator, his wife, his mother and father, his uncle chikkappa and sister malthi. How the family transforms from a poor family to a rich one. The best thing about the book is book starts with a oracular waiter Vincent who speaks little in whole book but whatever he speaks is like a God to the narrator. Narrator thinks he knows everything. How money controls people and makes this family life a ghachar ghochar. Author has explained each character in this book beautifully and has made justice to each character. How a new rich family behaves with the richness. I felt the story incomplete and the narrator being little less intelligent as he is unknown to worldly things. Overall it's a very sweet and good goodread... ( )
  ShriVenne | May 14, 2020 |
Fun short read about a dysfunctional family in Bangalore ( )
  kuthkameen | Mar 22, 2020 |
The translation was good and very readable, but I think some of the content and format had a cultural disconnect for me. The description of the family's life and background was excellent, but by the time I got to the end of this very short book, it felt like that was the only element that was truly fleshed out. ( )
  jekka | Jan 24, 2020 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Vivek Shanbhagautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Perur, SrinathTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Samuelsson, PeterTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schreiber, DanielTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Turle, BernardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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For readers of Akhil Sharma, Mohsin Hamid, and Teju Cole, a haunting novel about an upwardly mobile family splintered by success in rapidly changing India. "It's true what they say--it's not we who control money, it's the money that controls us." In this masterful novel by the acclaimed Indian writer Vivek Shanbhag, a close-knit family is delivered from near-destitution to sudden wealth after the narrator's uncle founds a successful spice company. As the narrator--a sensitive young man who is never named--his sister, his parents, and his uncle move from a cramped, ant-infested shack to a larger house and begin to grow accustomed to their newfound wealth, the family dynamics begin to shift. Allegiances and desires realign; marriages are arranged and begin to falter; and conflict brews ominously in the background. Things begin to become "ghachar ghochar"--a nonsense phrase that, to the narrator, comes to mean something entangled beyond repair. Told in clean, urgent prose, and punctuated by moments of unexpected warmth and humor, Ghachar Ghochar is a quietly enthralling, deeply unsettling novel about the shifting meanings--and consequences--of financial gain in contemporary India"--

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