Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies…
A carregar...

The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps (edição 2016)

por Edward Brooke-Hitching (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2701173,474 (4.13)2
The Phantom Atlas is an atlas of the world not as it ever existed, but as it was thought to be. These marvellous and mysterious phantoms, non-existent islands, invented mountain ranges, mythical civilisations and other fictitious geography - were all at various times presented as facts on maps and atlases. This book is a collection of striking antique maps that display the most erroneous cartography, with each illustration accompanied by the story behind it. Exploration, map-making and mythology are all brought together to create a colourful tapestry of monsters, heroes and volcanoes; swindlers, mirages and murderers. Sometimes the stories are almost impossible to believe, and remarkably, some of the errors were still on display in maps published in the 21st century. Throughout much of the 19th century more than 40 different mapmakers included the Mountains of Kong, a huge range of peaks stretching across the entire continent of Africa, in their maps - but it was only in 1889 when Louis Gustave Binger revealed the whole thing to be a fake. For centuries, explorers who headed to Patagonia returned with tales of the giants they had met who lived there, some nine feet tall.… (mais)
Membro:gottschalkm
Título:The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps
Autores:Edward Brooke-Hitching (Autor)
Informação:Simon & Schuster Ltd (2016), 256 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Kristin Sorenson

Pormenores da obra

The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps por Edward Brooke-Hitching

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 2 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Review of: The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps,
by Edward Brooke-Hitching
by Stan Prager (3-31-19)

A small island called “Bermeja” in the Gulf of Mexico that was first charted in 1539 was—after an extensive search of the coordinates—found to be a “phantom” that never actually existed in that latitude, or anywhere else for that matter. It turns out that this kind of thing is not unusual, that countless phantom islands, some the stuff of great legend, appeared on countless charts dating back well beyond the so-called “Age of Discovery” to the very earliest maps of antiquity. What is unusual about Bermeja is that its nonexistence was only determined in 2009, after showing up on maps for almost five hundred years!
The reader first encounters Bermejo in the “Introduction” to The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps, by Edward Brooke-Hitching, a delightful, beautifully illustrated volume that is marked by both the eclectic and the eccentric. But the island that never was also later gets its due in its own chapter, along with a wonderful, detailed map of its alleged location. This is just one of nearly sixty such chapters that explores the mythical and the fantastical, ranging from the famous and near-famous—such as the Lost Continent of Atlantis and the Kingdom of Prester John—to the utterly obscure, like Bermeja, and the near-obscure, like the island of Wak-Wak. While the latter, also known as Waq-Waq in some accounts, apparently existed only in the imagination of the author of one of the tales in One Thousand and One Nights, it nevertheless made it into the charts courtesy of Muhammad al-Idrisi, a respected twelfth-century Arab cartographer.
But The Phantom Atlas is not just all about islands. There are mythical lands, like El Dorado and the Lost City of the Kalahari; cartographic blunders, such as mapping California and Korea as islands; even persistent wrong-headed notions like the Flat Earth. There is also a highly entertaining chapter devoted to the outlandish beings that populate the 1493 “Nuremberg Chronicle Map,” featuring such wild and weird creatures as the “six-handed man,” hairy women known as “Gorgades,” the four-eyed Ethiopian “Nistyi,” and the dog-headed “Cynocephali.” That at least some audiences once entertained the notion that such inhabitants thrived in various corners of the globe is a reminder that the exotic characters invented by Jonathan Swift for Gulliver's Travels were not so outrageous after all.
One of the longer and most fascinating chapters, entitled “Earthly Paradise,” relates the many attempts to fix the Biblical Garden of Eden to a physical, mapped location. The author places that into the context of a wider concept that extends far beyond the People of the Book to a universal longing that he suggests is neatly conjured up with the Welsh word “Hiraeth,” which he loosely defines as “an overwhelming feeling of grief and longing for one’s people and land of the past, a kind of amplified spiritual homesickness for a place one has never been to.” [p92] It is charming prose like that which marks Brooke-Hitching as a talented writer and distinguishes this volume from so many other atlases that are often simply a collection of maps mated with text to serve as a kind of obligatory device to fill out the pages. In happy contrast, there are enchanting stories attached to these maps, and the author is a master raconteur. But the maps and other illustrations, nearly all in full color, clearly steal the show in The Phantom Atlas.
Because I obtained this book as part of an Early Reviewers program, I felt an obligation to read it cover-to-cover, but that is hardly necessary. A better strategy is to simply pick up the book and let it open to any page at random, then feast your eyes on the maps and pause to read the narrative—if you can take your eyes off the maps! From al-Idrisi ‘s 1154 map of Wak-Wak, to Ortelius’s 1598 map of the Tartar Kingdom, to a 1939 map of Antarctica featuring Morrell’s Island—which of course does not really exist—you are guaranteed to never grow bored with the visual content or the chronicles.
There are, it should be noted, a couple of drawbacks in arrangement and design, but these are to be laid at the feet of the publisher, not the author. First of all, the book is organized alphabetically—from the Strait of Anian to the Phantom Lands of the Zeno—rather than grouped thematically, which would have no doubt made for a more sensible editorial alternative. Most critically, while the volume is somewhat oversize, the pages are hardly large enough to do the maps full justice, even with the best reading glasses. Perhaps the cost was prohibitive but given the quality of the art this well-deserves treatment in a much grander coffee table size edition. Still, despite these quibbles, fans of both cartography and the mysteries of history will find themselves drawn to this fine book.

Review of: The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps, by Edward Brooke-Hitching https://regarp.com/2019/03/31/review-of-the-phantom-atlas-the-greatest-myths-lie...

MAP CREDIT: Tanner, Henry S. - A Map of the United States of Mexico, 1846, public domain, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bermeja#/media/File:Bermeja.jpg

ILLUSTRATION CREDIT: A cynocephalus. From the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493) Hartmann Schedel (1440-1514), - Nuremberg Chronical (Schedel'sche Weltchronik), page XIIr, public domain, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynocephaly#/media/File:Schedel%27sche_Weltchronik... ( )
1 vote Garp83 | Mar 31, 2019 |
This is an alphabetically ordered list of phantom islands and other errors that have been presented as real on maps. They range from the well-known, such as St. Brendan's Island, to the decidedly obscure, such as the fictitious Mountains of Kong that graced 19th century maps of West Africa and which I hadn't heard of before.

In some ways, this is the book I'd have wished that The Un-Discovered Islands - which I read and reviewed last autumn - were. In particular, this one includes colour reproductions of relevant maps, with helpful insets enlarging the particular islands or other features under discussion. On the other hands, the book gives a somewhat rushed impression: one paragraph is missing its concluding line(s), apparently lost under an illustration, I noted enough errors to be a bit wary about what Brooke-Hitching says about what I don't know, and the text is too often vague or ambiguous. Once or twice image captions refer to things never explained in the main text, and in one amusing instance he makes it sound as if Timbuktu were another myth, lie, or blunder.

Still, for all that better editing and fact-checking could have been wished for, the book is beautiful and interesting; I do not regret buying it.
2 vote AndreasJ | Aug 11, 2018 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book is amazing! Edward Brooke-Hitching has written an atlas of cartography’s mistakes, but you don’t need to have any background knowledge of history or map-making in order to appreciate this wonderful collection. The author does a fantastic job of explaining these histories to a lay audience, and he is very succinct, devoting only a few pages to each blunder. The stories are interesting, covering a broad range of topics: islands that probably existed once but have been swallowed by the ocean, mountains that never were, rival explorers whose “discoveries” outdid each other, races of giants, mythical sea creatures, lost continents, and so much more. I like the author’s tone very much; he does a good job of presenting the facts objectively, but the style is still very readable and, at times, funny. I also like that the content is laid out alphabetically, rather than by type of mistake; this keeps the content varied. The images are beautiful, with clear reproductions of very old maps. All in all, thoroughly enjoyable! ( )
  MuuMuuMousie | Jun 27, 2018 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
A wonderful full color book for all those who love maps, and who love their insight into the history of the period they were created in. Map-heads will love this as a gift. My husband has been known to zone out in front of a map for hours at a time. He loves this book as it is great read. ( )
  Autolykos | Jun 16, 2018 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This is a great book. Each entry is a few pages about some place (or occasionally some people or animals) that was represented on maps of the past but which doesn't exist, at least as represented. Examples: Atlantis (doesn't exist); California (exists, but isn't an island.) The entries are concise but informative and well-researched. The descriptions of how the items came to be believed in, charted and mapped, carried on in subsequent maps, and eventually dropped, is thorough and interesting. And the author has a good eye for absurd or interesting detail about the fictitious lands themselves.

The book is handsome. Lots of illustrations of the old maps. Maybe a bit hard to read in detail, but judicious use of blown-up insets help a lot.

I recommend the book if you are open to the romance of maps or the romance of places which didn't exist but maybe should have.
  Capybara_99 | Jun 7, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Emma and Franklin Where would I be without you?
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

The Phantom Atlas is an atlas of the world not as it ever existed, but as it was thought to be. These marvellous and mysterious phantoms, non-existent islands, invented mountain ranges, mythical civilisations and other fictitious geography - were all at various times presented as facts on maps and atlases. This book is a collection of striking antique maps that display the most erroneous cartography, with each illustration accompanied by the story behind it. Exploration, map-making and mythology are all brought together to create a colourful tapestry of monsters, heroes and volcanoes; swindlers, mirages and murderers. Sometimes the stories are almost impossible to believe, and remarkably, some of the errors were still on display in maps published in the 21st century. Throughout much of the 19th century more than 40 different mapmakers included the Mountains of Kong, a huge range of peaks stretching across the entire continent of Africa, in their maps - but it was only in 1889 when Louis Gustave Binger revealed the whole thing to be a fake. For centuries, explorers who headed to Patagonia returned with tales of the giants they had met who lived there, some nine feet tall.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Edward Brooke-Hitching's book The Phantom Atlas was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Adira para obter um exemplar pré-publicação em troca de uma resenha.

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.13)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 5
3.5
4 7
4.5 5
5 8

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 155,841,409 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível