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Word by Word: The Secret Life of…
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Word by Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries (edição 2017)

por Kory Stamper (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,1006718,759 (4.15)52
"Brimming with intelligence and personality, a vastly entertaining account of how dictionaries are made - a must read for word mavens. Have you ever tried to define the word "is?" Do you have strong feelings about the word (and, yes, it is a word) "irregardless?" Did you know that OMG was first used in 1917, in a letter to Winston Churchill? These are the questions that keep lexicographers up at night. While most of us might take dictionaries for granted, the process of writing dictionaries is in fact as lively and dynamic as language itself. With sharp wit and irreverence, Kory Stamper cracks open the complex, obsessive world of lexicography, from the agonizing decisions about what and how to define, to the knotty questions of usage in an ever-changing language. She explains why the small words are the most difficult to define, how it can take nine months to define a single word, and how our biases about language and pronunciation can have tremendous social influence. Throughout Stamper brings to life the hallowed halls (and highly idiosyncratic cubicles) of Merriam-Webster, a surprisingly rich world inhabited by quirky and erudite individuals who quietly shape the way we communicate. A sure delight for all lovers of words, Harmless Drudges will also improve readers' grasp and use of the English language"--… (mais)
Membro:editormom
Título:Word by Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries
Autores:Kory Stamper (Autor)
Informação:Pantheon (2017), 320 pages
Coleções:Reference work
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Word by Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries por Kory Stamper

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Mostrando 1-5 de 67 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Okay, I just finished wrestling with words writing my dissertation so perhaps I was ready for this type of book. That said, I found Kory Stamper's job fascinating in a way that appeals to the hermit in me! She has just the right amount of humor within the very serious context of words and meanings. ( )
  kwagnerroberts | Jun 24, 2024 |
A fun and fascinating look at how disctionaries are created and updated, told with knowledge and humor. I liked how the book was organized around chapters devoted to specific words and lexicograhers' tasks.

This was my June pick for my Julia Memorial Read (reading a book each month that she rated highly), and I can see why she loved it. Stamper and Julia share(d) a love of words and language. And humor.

4 stars ( )
  katiekrug | Jun 15, 2024 |
a fun introduction to the day to day life and pursuits of the average lexicographer. If nothing else, I now know that pumpernickel means fart goblin ( )
  cspiwak | Mar 6, 2024 |
A wonderful look into the world of lexicography, or crafting and compiling the words and definitions that comprise a dictionary (and other relevant features such as first usage origin, pronunciations, etc.) Stamper describes her job as constant reading, searching for possible new senses or examples of existing ones as citations, and that sounds like a dream job (teasing out the finer points of the verb forms of take: less so).

I've been prescriptivist in the past, but I'm coming round to the descriptive position- that dictionaries, etc. are here to log usage of a living language, not necessarily what the "right" version is (which is why irregardless, ain't, and other words have a place in the dictionary- because people use them). ( )
  Daumari | Dec 28, 2023 |
Delightful. For anyone who's attempted to read a dictionary (why? mind your business), or just has a fascination with language, this will be a hit. How are words chosen for a dictionary? How are definitions developed? Who decides what the definitions of words are? Does changing a definition in the dictionary change the word's meaning in real life (no, duh)? This is funny, self-deprecating, and always illuminating. If you don't follow Merriam-Webster on Instagram, you should. ( )
  KallieGrace | Nov 9, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 67 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Hungry word lovers will find this book a delicious, multicourse meal of word lore, the personal story of the author’s life and career, and detailed backstory of the harrowing process by which dictionaries are produced.
adicionada por Katya0133 | editarLibrary Journal, Paul A. D’Alessandro (Mar 1, 2017)
 
Stamper . . . has drawn up a witty, sly, occasionally profane behind-the-scenes tour aimed at deposing the notion of "real and proper English" and replacing it with a genuine appreciation for the glories and frustrations of finding just the right word.
adicionada por Katya0133 | editarPublishers Weekly (Dec 5, 2016)
 
Word by Word offers marvelous insight into the messy world behind the tidy definitions on the page.
adicionada por Katya0133 | editarBooklist, Bridget Thoreson (Dec 1, 2016)
 
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Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
It may be observed that the English language is not a system of logic, that its vocabulary has not developed in correlation with generations of straight thinkers, that we cannot impose upon it something preconceived as an ideal of scientific method and expect to come out with anything more systematic and more clarifying than what we start with: what we start with is an inchoate heterogenenous conglomerate that retains the indestructible bones of innumerable tries at orderly communication, and our definitions as a body are bound to reflect this situation.
— Philip Babcock Gove, Merriam-Webster in house "Defining Techniques" memo, May 22, 1958
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For my parents, Allen and Diane, who bought me books and loved me well.
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Language is one of the few common experiences humanity has.
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Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
If we hold to the schedule, the new Unabridged should be finished a few weeks before Christ returns in majesty to judge the quick and the dead.
Lexicography moves so slowly that scientists classify it as a solid.
Most people think of the parts of speech as discrete categories, drawers with their own identifying labels, and when you peek inside, there's the English language, neatly folded like a retiree's socks: Person, Place, Thing (Noun); Describes Action (Verb); Modifies Nouns (Adjectives); Answers the W Questions (Adverb); Joins Words Together (Conjuction); Things We Say When We Are Happy, Surprised, or Pissed Off (Interjection).
Your job as a lexicographer, and part of the reason why Gil is looking doubtfully in your general direction this afternoon, is to learn how to carefully parse English as it is used, sentence by sentence, and correctly classify the words within that sentence by their function. You don't decide what part of speech a word is—the general speaking, writing public does. You merely discern what its part of speech is and then accurately report it in the dictionary entry.
We think of English as a fortress to be defended, but a better analogy is to think of English as a child. We love and nurture it into being, and once it gains gross motor skills, it starts going exactly where we don't want it to go; it heads right for the goddamned electrical sockets. We dress it in fancy clothes and tell it to behave, and it comes home with its underwear on its head and wearing someone else's socks. As English grows, it lives its own life, and this is right and healthy. Sometimes English does exactly what we think it should; sometimes it goes places we don't like and thrives there in spite of all our worrying. We can tell it to clean itself up and act more like Latin; we can throw tantrums and start learning French instead. But we will never really be the boss of it. And that's why it flourishes.
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"Brimming with intelligence and personality, a vastly entertaining account of how dictionaries are made - a must read for word mavens. Have you ever tried to define the word "is?" Do you have strong feelings about the word (and, yes, it is a word) "irregardless?" Did you know that OMG was first used in 1917, in a letter to Winston Churchill? These are the questions that keep lexicographers up at night. While most of us might take dictionaries for granted, the process of writing dictionaries is in fact as lively and dynamic as language itself. With sharp wit and irreverence, Kory Stamper cracks open the complex, obsessive world of lexicography, from the agonizing decisions about what and how to define, to the knotty questions of usage in an ever-changing language. She explains why the small words are the most difficult to define, how it can take nine months to define a single word, and how our biases about language and pronunciation can have tremendous social influence. Throughout Stamper brings to life the hallowed halls (and highly idiosyncratic cubicles) of Merriam-Webster, a surprisingly rich world inhabited by quirky and erudite individuals who quietly shape the way we communicate. A sure delight for all lovers of words, Harmless Drudges will also improve readers' grasp and use of the English language"--

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