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Autonomous por Annalee Newitz
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Autonomous (edição 2017)

por Annalee Newitz

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
9334517,100 (3.7)38
Earth, 2144. Jack is an anti-patent scientist turned drug pirate, traversing the world in a submarine as a pharmaceutical Robin Hood, fabricating cheap scrips for poor people who can't otherwise afford them. But her latest drug hack has left a trail of lethal overdoses as people become addicted to their work, doing repetitive tasks until they become unsafe or insane. Hot on her trail, an unlikely pair: Eliasz, a brooding military agent, and his robotic partner, Paladin. As they race to stop information about the sinister origins of Jack's drug from getting out, they begin to form an uncommonly close bond that neither of them fully understand. And underlying it all is one fundamental question: Is freedom possible in a culture where everything, even people, can be owned?… (mais)
Membro:KeefP
Título:Autonomous
Autores:Annalee Newitz
Informação:Orbit, Kindle Edition, 304 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Autonomous por Annalee Newitz

Adicionado recentemente porRandyRasa, shelvedamongthestars, biblioteca privada, noisydeadlines, VadersMorwen, Dal05713, ckrome, sharvani
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» Ver também 38 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 44 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Fascinating sci-fi that discusses Artificial Intelligence, bio-hacking, patents, human-bot relationships and piracy. It had that Asimov’s feel making me wonder about robots programming and how they could develop consciousness and feelings.
I felt empathy for all the characters even the evil ones! Although there’s no good versus evil. It’s more like everybody’s doing what they believe is right and the arguments are all valid.
( )
  noisydeadlines | Jul 30, 2021 |
Biopunk I guess? Problem is I've always bounced off *punk and I can't figure out why; probably the things that people read for in *punk are things that I think are cool and all but just aren't the things I want to carry the story. So here the world is interesting, the human protagonist engages in a worthy cause (albeit having made a tragic mistake), the robot sidekick to the apparent antagonist is an interesting character, but it kept feeling like I was wading through it and each time I put it down I was less inclined to pick it up. It didn't help that there seemed to be two burgeoning romances, both of which seemed to me to be coming from a seriously unhealthy dynamic which the book seemed to partially acknowledge but not enough that I could trust in an ending that wouldn't leave me deeply unsatisfied. I'd vaguely like to know how things turn out, but not enough to keep wading through. Mileage of course will vary. ( )
  zeborah | Apr 23, 2021 |
Ugh, really disliked the poorly-handled themes of homophobia, transgender, and human+robot "love and sex". ( )
  coopr | Mar 28, 2021 |
It's the year 2144 and everything happens on Earth, although mankind has managed to establish a colony on, for example, Mars, where everything is being prepared for permanent living. On Earth, there's the African Federation, the IPC and other organisations, but not much, if nothing, is known about them.

We follow several characters in this SF-thriller: Jack aka Judith Chen (a pirate, reverse engineered a drug to provide it to less fortunate people; a bit like Robin Hood, if you will, but that's a small exaggeration), Krish (runs the Freelab, used to form a couple with Jack, also has a history with her, until he wanted to do "things" in a more legal fashion), Eliasz and Paladin (the first is a military agent, the latter his military robot), Med (short for Medea, lab robot, does research), and Threezed (3Z, indeed) (also a robot, was a slave, but could - thanks to Jack - better his life).

I'll leave it to the other reviewers here (plenty of those) to describe how the story evolves, but as it goes: You break the law, you get caught, you face the consequences. Oh wait, no, you don't get caught. Due to divine intervention, you manage to escape and live a new life undercover. And everything remains as it's always was. Sort of. There are changes on both sides, so you could say it's a tie, one way or another. Jack goes undercover, never gets caught again; Zaxy continues with selling Zacuity, the drug that started it all - despite some customers/clients not wanting to deal with Zaxy any more; the IPC has ceased all punishment of pirates; Freelab continues, this time led by Med, as Krish sadly didn't survive.

----------

What I liked:
The various questions raised when it comes to our present and near future.
Today, robots and AI (Artificial Intelligence) are used in various domains: car manufacturing, retirement homes, various production/construction/... processes, toys, ... Soon enough, we'll have military robots, too, as warfare continues to evolve because of an increasing use of technology.

Do robots deserve to be autonomous? To think for themselves and act accordingly?
Do robots have to have rights? Or are they mere tools, in service of human beings?
Do robots have to be treated equally to humans? Or must they remain subjected to human laws and orders?
For which purposes can robots be used?
How far should we go to make robots look, act, think, ... like human beings?
Can robots have feelings/emotions?
Etc.

The book is, as I saw it, also a complaint against big pharmaceutical companies. They own all the rights, are the sole holders of truth, and woe unto those who oppose them, even dare to reverse engineer the medicine to try to help less fortunate people.

What I didn't like or liked less:
01) The vocabulary:
- There is a lot of technical vocabulary here, not always, if not, explained. That makes it harder to get into the story, really "get" some passages.
- Like in '1984' and similar SF-novels: new vocabulary. It may look cool and fancy, but I find it forced. I highly doubt people will use such language in 2144. Some example: nym (as in pseudonym, synonym, ...), Retcon, regen (reverse engineering), AU, IPC, repo (repository, report, repurchase agreement - yes, I had to look it up -, ...?). A few - not all - were written in full once or twice, then never again, not even as a footnote. As I wrote: fancy, forced.
- Flat, vulgar vocabulary: several times the f-word. Oooh, the f-word. No, it's not that, but here it's used as if I was watching your typical kind of American (specifically, in the USA) series. Like I wrote above, I doubt one will use speech/language in such a manner in 2144. Did Ms Newitz write the respective dialogues so as to attract a more YA-public? Was she given such advice from her publisher? Either way, it's totally unnecessary to insert the f-word in a book like this one.

02) The characters: a bit on the flat side. I found it difficult to relate to any of them. Strangely enough, probably because of how the story is written, I even rooted for the military agents Eliasz and Paladin, hoping they would catch the pirates/perpetrators, even though these "pirates" were actually the good ones, going against big pharma. Let's not forget the "love affair" between Eliasz and his Paladin, who was first considered male (as is common for robots: any robot, despite the absence of gender, is considered male), then female (because of the brain that was installed. Psychology: what makes humans love a robot? Is it real love? It is a fantasy, a fetish? When the robot supposedly loves back: is this because of an instruction? Is it because of its proper desire?

03) Not enough depth, working out of the world and the various players: the IPC, the African Federation, the political system, ... 'Autonomous' only offers a glimpse of all this, it barely scratched the surface. There are enough gaps to write at least one more book, if not two, that offers a broader view on this fictitious world anno 2144.

----------

Like a few other readers, I was not fully convinced, because of the aforementioned aspects. Truth be told, I was very much convinced and liking the story for a good portion, until around the last 1/3, when the structure collapsed. The book does contain good ideas (sociological questions, the impact of technology on society and on human beings, ...), packed in a thrilling, fast-paced story, but on a whole, the book leaves quite a bit to be desired. In my humble opinion, of course. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
I'm on the fence about this book. The concepts Newitz brought up about drug companies and patent control was intriguing and a little terrifying. However, the characters' relationships seemed forced and the issues surrounding consent with Threezed and especially Paladin were troubling. I wish the arguments surrounding bot autonomy had been as well fleshed out (no pun intended) as the patent bits. ( )
  Bodagirl | Jan 20, 2021 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Annalee Newitzautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Guarnieri, AnnaritaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Herden, BirgitTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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For all the robots who question their programming.
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Earth, 2144. Jack is an anti-patent scientist turned drug pirate, traversing the world in a submarine as a pharmaceutical Robin Hood, fabricating cheap scrips for poor people who can't otherwise afford them. But her latest drug hack has left a trail of lethal overdoses as people become addicted to their work, doing repetitive tasks until they become unsafe or insane. Hot on her trail, an unlikely pair: Eliasz, a brooding military agent, and his robotic partner, Paladin. As they race to stop information about the sinister origins of Jack's drug from getting out, they begin to form an uncommonly close bond that neither of them fully understand. And underlying it all is one fundamental question: Is freedom possible in a culture where everything, even people, can be owned?

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