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Heavy Words Lightly Thrown: The Reason…
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Heavy Words Lightly Thrown: The Reason Behind the Rhyme (original 2003; edição 2006)

por Chris Roberts

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5682431,879 (3.4)17
Nursery rhymes are rarely as innocent as they seem--there is a wealth of concealed meaning in our familiar childhood verse. More than a century after Queen Victoria decided that children were better off without the full story, London librarian Roberts brings the truth to light. He traces the origins of the subtle phrases and antiquated references, revealing religious hatred, political subversion, and sexual innuendo. A history lesson that makes astonishing connections to contemporary popular culture, this book is for Anglophiles, parents, history buffs, and anyone who has ever wondered about the origins of rhymes. The book features a glossary of slang and historical terms, and silhouettes of Mother Goose characters to accompany the rhymes.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:FenwayFaithful23
Título:Heavy Words Lightly Thrown: The Reason Behind the Rhyme
Autores:Chris Roberts
Informação:Gotham (2006), Paperback, 224 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Heavy Words Lightly Thrown por Chris Roberts (2003)

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This is an anthology of old nursery rhymes which purports to explain the origin of the rhymes.....many of which have political implications. Of course, there are also a huge number of variants of the rhymes that have been used or developed over the years as well. This complicated the interpretation of the rhymes. I have somewhat mixed feeling about the book. I don't think it's especially scholarly. For example, with the rhyme: "Goosey goosey gander.......
There I met an old man who wouldn't say his prayers
So I took him by the left leg and threw him down the stairs"
Roberts simply interprets this as having sexual meanings with the idea that "goose" refers to a "prostitute"....whereas other commentators draw attention to the fact that it is probably related to Catholic priests ..who if found in priest holes etc were likely to be thrown down the stairs......or to the actual case of Cardinal Beaton who would not submit to the covenanter's demands and was thrown down the stairs.
So interesting, not especially reliable or scholarly, and Roberts throws in some of his own amusing writing touches for good measure. (Some work...some don't....at least for me).
I rate it as three stars. Easy reading. But I don't think I'll keep it. ( )
  booktsunami | Apr 4, 2020 |
As I read this I compared each verse, and the theories of its origins (and, sometimes, subsequent applications and adaptations) to [b:The Annotated Mother Goose: With an Introduction and Notes|440528|The Annotated Mother Goose With an Introduction and Notes|William S. Baring-Gould|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1387742644s/440528.jpg|429331]. By and large, they agree closely. This book is much shorter, but adds in some interesting British history (both ancient and recent) and humor (with a semi-helpful glossary).

Consider it a 'sampler' of a larger work, of which AMG is just one of many available. Roberts used clip art from Dover Publishing to aptly illustrate this. (AMG uses illustrations from anonymous woodcuts, and from Parrish, Greenaway, Caldecott, and Rackham.) Roberts' brief bibliography does not mention AMG, but then, there is actually a lot of material in this field.

The difficulty is, once you start seeing meaning you can find it anywhere, and people have been looking for a long time."

Jack may have jumped over a candlestick to prove his fitness as part of a job application process. "Before you dismiss [that] as a flight of fancy, [think of] some of the absurd management-training courses... in vogue. In fact, a book called The Pagan Way to Human Resource Management would surely be a great success."

The London Bridge that Lake Havasu was created for is not the original, the one that lasted many centuries. It is the one that John Rennie designed poorly in 1832, which was replaced by the current less attractive but more functional one in the 1970s." ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
I bought this because I saw a friend's post on it and it sounded interesting. Plus I'm a sucker for a good title.

Unfortunately, it doesn't really live up. And the subtitle is way off. Rather than "The Reason Behind the Rhyme," it should be "Apocryphal Stories and Historical Gossip Tangentially Related to Nursery Rhymes." But I suppose that lacks a certain . . . clichéness. (Wow. How's that for getting my snark on?)

But I sound a lot more disappointed than I actually am. I didn't have any real reason for high expectations; it's not like my friend was saying it was the book of the year or anything. And the title was, of course, stolen from a Smiths song. So I wasn't terribly let down or anything. I had hoped for him to stay a bit more focused, though. Often it seemed like he was taking every opportunity to go off on some barely related tangent. I'm not much a fan of that kind of rhetoric, so I usually found that annoying. If you are a fan of it—and plenty of people are, it's nothing to be ashamed of—then you'll probably love the book.

It did seem like he kept telling the same stories over and over, but I suspect that's due to (a) my lack of knowledge/interest concerning British royals and (2) the fact that said royals keep getting into the same kinds of scandals over and over, generation after generation. ( )
1 vote spoko | Nov 14, 2013 |
I really loved reading this book. I've always been fascinated by childhood rhymes and the stories behind them. This is well written and down to the level, with some great jokes and quips thrown into every article for each new piece. I'd advise to anyone with even a passing fancy. It's a quick, fun, lighthearted to read write-up of as it says some pretty heavy stuff.

( )
  wanderlustlover | Jul 24, 2013 |
In this book, author Chris Roberts considers English language nursery rhymes in terms of their original, historical meanings. He traces some of these rhymes to the Middle Ages, but many others to the Tudor and Stuart monarchies of the 1500s through the early 1700s. In his account, these innocent- seeming rhymes reveal “religious hatred, political subversion, and sexual innuendo.” Thus, Humpty Dumpty is said to have been a cannon placed on the wall of a Colchester church. “Georgy Porgy” allegedly refers to the unpopular and portly George IV, and “Baa Baa Black Sheep” was originally a complaint against taxes. “Sing a Song of Sixpence” might refer to Henry VIII, and his first two wives. or maybe not -- and that raises a problem.

For many of the rhymes discussed, the author presents multiple, conflicting interpretations, each of which he supports with conjecture and speculation. This practice calls into question the legitimacy and accuracy of the book.

For example, consider “Mary, Mary Quite Contrary.” One possibility is that it is a jibe at Mary, Queen of Scots -- “the pretty maids all in a row” being a reference to the rampant promiscuity at court. Alternatively, the “garden” of the rhyme may be a cemetery full of Protestant martyrs, and the “silver bells and cockle shells” instruments of torture – in which case the Mary actually may be England’s Mary Tudor (aka “Bloody Mary”). Or perhaps the “Mary” is the mother of Jesus, and the “cockle shells” were badges worn by religious pilgrims. When a single simple rhyme gives rise to so many discrepant interpretations, clearly the reader can have no confidence in any one of them. Roberts sidesteps the contradictions by proposing that the rhyme “has come to represent either Mary, depending on how it is interpreted.” What can he possibly mean by this statement? The rhyme had an origin and a history, regardless of whether we can reconstruct what they were. Most of the rhymes discussed are of this sort – ones with multiple possible interpretations which are not able to be distinguished. Thus, this book becomes an exercise in imaginative speculation, not historical reconstruction.

In an afterword, the author gives the game away: ”Heavy Words was never meant to be a particularly scholarly exercise…. there are many alternative theories for several of the rhymes featured here, but this book has gone for the most interesting and plausible… “ The most interesting!? And so: entertainment was the goal. For anything like historical accuracy, readers will have to look elsewhere. ( )
8 vote danielx | May 4, 2011 |
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Nursery rhymes are rarely as innocent as they seem--there is a wealth of concealed meaning in our familiar childhood verse. More than a century after Queen Victoria decided that children were better off without the full story, London librarian Roberts brings the truth to light. He traces the origins of the subtle phrases and antiquated references, revealing religious hatred, political subversion, and sexual innuendo. A history lesson that makes astonishing connections to contemporary popular culture, this book is for Anglophiles, parents, history buffs, and anyone who has ever wondered about the origins of rhymes. The book features a glossary of slang and historical terms, and silhouettes of Mother Goose characters to accompany the rhymes.--From publisher description.

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