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The Story of Sushi: An Unlikely Saga of Raw…
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The Story of Sushi: An Unlikely Saga of Raw Fish and Rice (original 2007; edição 2008)

por Trevor Corson (Autor)

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4962438,255 (3.89)19
A New York Times Editor's Choice Everything you never knew about sushi-- its surprising origins, the colorful lives of its chefs, and the bizarre behavior of the creatures that compose it Trevor Corson takes us behind the scenes at America's first sushi-chef training academy, as eager novices strive to master the elusive art of cooking without cooking. He delves into the biology and natural history of the edible creatures of the sea, and tells the fascinating story of an Indo-Chinese meal reinvented in nineteenth-century Tokyo as a cheap fast food. He reveals the pioneers who brought sushi to the United States and explores how this unlikely meal is exploding into the American heartland just as the long-term future of sushi may be unraveling. The Story of Sushi is at once a compelling tale of human determination and a delectable smorgasbord of surprising food science, intrepid reporting, and provocative cultural history.… (mais)
Membro:chakmool
Título:The Story of Sushi: An Unlikely Saga of Raw Fish and Rice
Autores:Trevor Corson (Autor)
Informação:Harper Perennial (2008), Edition: Illustrated, 416 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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The Zen of Fish por Trevor Corson (2007)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 24 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I really really wanted to love this book...but:

I'm sure that Kate Murray is a lovely and intelligent woman. It is unfortunate that Corson's attempt to interweave personal documentary and history is such a miserable failure. I enjoyed half of this book--the part that really did seem to be "the story of sushi" rather than the "chauvinist story of Kate the sushi chef."

First, let me address the writing. A good portion of the narrative is written in "See Spot run" style. I'm not sure if that was supposed to be charming, but I don't pick up a history of sushi and expect a nostalgic look at my primary school reader. Not only did this lack of syntactical variety make the book a bore to read (in places), but it really infantilized Kate (in addition to far more egregious errors). I had no respect for her as a "character" in the "story" of sushi. This is how Corson believes we will connect to Kate's story:

"Kate was reasonably happy until partway into her senior year, when she broke her index finger. The injury prevented her from playing soccer. Without soccer, Kate got depressed. She stopped going to school. Then she got sick."

Kate got depressed. Huh. We go on to learn that "She lost a lot of weight" and it was sushi that set her on the road back to health. Seems like a good narrative arc, until the rest of the book spends time on Kate's fear of gross fish guts, sharp knives, and a preference for Monster Energy drinks over Red Bull (just one instance of gratuitous detail, page 197).

There are more interesting characters at the California Sushi Academy! We get a reasonable glimpse of Zoran, the instructor and source of Kate's fear and trembling. Takumi and Marcos make token appearances so that we can remember there are other members of the class, but doubtless they would not have provided the narrative opportunities that Kate did. Witness:

"When she'd finished, she changed into tight jeans and a tank top..." (212)
"The top of her pink thong underwear showed above the waistline of her pants." (212)
"She sailed off to the ladies' room and slipped out of her uniform into a pair of pants and a tight shirt." (269)

But Corson's fixation on Kate's apparel isn't the only problem. Pages 281-2 seem to make a point that sushi chefs are perverts, with discussions of female customers with "ample bosom[s]"...Toshi tells us that "Working at the sushi bar really is the ideal angle for viewing breasts." The discussion of breasts fills up a page. This section is completely gratuitous and serves absolutely no purpose except to show that Toshi likes to oggle and objectify women. Super--I'm glad I learned that as part of "The story of SUSHI."

What frustrates me is that I'd love to keep roughly half the book as a reference. There's a lot of good stuff there, and Corson's actual FOOD and history writing is far more fluid and interesting than his portrayal of the humans in the story. If I'm being charitable, I think he bit off too much (pun intended) here--the history and sociology of food are enough without the soap opera. Corson makes several references to Jiro Ono, the master sushi chef made famous in the 2011 documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi. It is a shame that this book predates the documentary, because Corson no doubt would have learned a lot about how to honor a documentary subject without sensationalizing. ( )
  rebcamuse | Jun 18, 2021 |
I liked the information about how sushi came from ancient Japan to a restaurant near me. The story of the school and its students was not very interesting to me. Had they been left out, the book would have been 1/3 as long, but I'd have gotten as much from it and liked it better. ( )
  KittyCunningham | Apr 26, 2021 |
I love sushi, and this is a good book about "behind the bar" for the sushi chef. It focuses on the California Sushi Academy and some students, particularly a female student "Kate", and the challenges with even a 12-week shortened training program. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
Quite possibly the best nonfiction I've read this year. Corson uses as the base of his story, the experiences of students in a three month course during 2005, on becoming a sushi chef at the California Sushi Academy in the L.A. area. He includes stories of the various teachers and the restaurant where the academy is housed. In amongst that story, are histories of sushi making, natural histories of the many ingredients used in making sushi and general cultural knowledge of those who have fallen in love with eating sushi. This was a drama of lives, but not in the Iron Chef or reality TV show formula.

It was instructive, and inspiring and frustrating. Instructive and inspiring in that it helped me understand some of the Japanese ways of flavor (in fact, inspired by this book, I made the best sole I've ever managed last night, broiled after a light marinade in sake, soy sauce, rice vinegar, chili oil and sugar - then I used the marinade to pour over my broccoli which I then roasted in the oven. Delicious!), and the possibilities of making sushi for myself. Although it is not a cookbook and contains no recipes, there are good references at the end for those who want to go further with it. Frustrating in that it makes you want to rush out to the nearest decent sushi bar and have the experience of eating well made sushi. I don't think there is one closer than 90 miles away from me, so that won't be happening soon. When I do go though, I will go with a much better understanding of the experience and food. ( )
  MrsLee | Sep 2, 2017 |
An unlikely saga of raw fish and rice
  jhawn | Jul 31, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 24 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The book's real strength is Corson's skill at making the science of sushi interesting, presenting details in a playful and unintimidating manner for those of us without backgrounds in marine biology. He provides fascinating detail of a number of the most popular sushi toppings, imbuing his descriptions with just enough scientific trivia to capture the fascination of his mass-market target audience yet not give the impression he is watering down his presentations. Throughout the book, he covers topics such as the biology of tuna (which are, believe it or not, a warm-blooded fish); the composition of various types of muscles in fish and their differing flavor profiles; the anti-bacterial characteristics of sushi garnishes, such as shredded radish and perilla (shiso 紫蘇) leaves; and the (truly fascinating) life-cycle of eels.
 
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Kate Murray's alarm clock went off at 5:30 a.m.
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A New York Times Editor's Choice Everything you never knew about sushi-- its surprising origins, the colorful lives of its chefs, and the bizarre behavior of the creatures that compose it Trevor Corson takes us behind the scenes at America's first sushi-chef training academy, as eager novices strive to master the elusive art of cooking without cooking. He delves into the biology and natural history of the edible creatures of the sea, and tells the fascinating story of an Indo-Chinese meal reinvented in nineteenth-century Tokyo as a cheap fast food. He reveals the pioneers who brought sushi to the United States and explores how this unlikely meal is exploding into the American heartland just as the long-term future of sushi may be unraveling. The Story of Sushi is at once a compelling tale of human determination and a delectable smorgasbord of surprising food science, intrepid reporting, and provocative cultural history.

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Trevor Corson é um Autor LibraryThing, um autor que lista a sua biblioteca pessoal no LibraryThing.

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