Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Cantata-140 (GollanczF.) por Philip K. Dick
A carregar...

Cantata-140 (GollanczF.) (original 1966; edição 2003)

por Philip K. Dick

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
7751021,278 (3.22)16
It's the year 2080, and Earth's seemingly insurmountable overpopulation problem has been temporarily alleviated by placing millions of people in voluntary deep freeze. But in election year, the pressure is on to find a solution which will enable them to resume their lives. For Jim Briskin, Presidential candidate, it seems an insoluble problem - until a flaw in the new instantaneous travel system opens up the possibility of finding whole new worlds to colonise.… (mais)
Membro:TXMagpie
Título:Cantata-140 (GollanczF.)
Autores:Philip K. Dick
Informação:Gollancz (2003), Paperback, 192 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The Crack in Space por Philip K. Dick (Author) (1966)

Adicionado recentemente porsnorrelo, AlleghenyCounty, IanPercival, rick_saenz, biblioteca privada, mrsnout, HotCold, mitchanderson

Nenhum(a).

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 16 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The Crack in Space posits our world about 2080 (which, at the time it was published, would have been over 100 years in the future): there is severe overpopulation, to the extent that many young people are choosing to be cryogenically frozen until the labor market is better. It's an election year, and there's a black presidential nominee for the first time ever. That nominee, Jim Briskin, is struggling in his campaign until he's tipped off about some major news: there's been a rift discovered to a whole new world...one that looks like it will support human life. Briskin seizes on this development to announce that it will be his platform to thaw out the frozen and give them this world to settle, and his opponent jockeys to match his promises, when it's revealed that the new world is populated after all, but not by people as we know them. Instead it's Peking man that survived. So now what?

That's maybe half the plot of this slim volume (it's about 200 pages long), but it's the main one. First of all, let me say that I'm glad that we beat out Dick's predictions and had our first black president 75 years ahead of schedule. Moving on from that, though, what I really enjoy about reading Dick's work is that he poses interesting, thoughtful questions rooted in an understanding of human nature. As much as we might think that if we discovered a parallel Earth we'd learn from our past and thoughtfully go about exploration and potential colonization, the reality is that in an election year, politicians would be falling all over each other to posture and secure an important position for themselves. If the world's population was so huge that abortion wasn't just widespread but encouraged, that people were freezing themselves in hopes of a better life someday, it would absolutely end up with people getting sent through the door/portal/whatever without much in the way of an actual plan while news cameras flashed and the powers that be congratulated themselves on a job well done. Maybe I'm a little cynical (I was a litigator and now I'm a lobbyist, so that probably comes with the territory), but I feel like Dick gets how people would actually behave instead of how they'd prefer to imagine they would. I found it a quick and enjoyable read which had me pondering alternate realities. ( )
  ghneumann | Oct 7, 2016 |
Although for PK Dick standards it feels "conventional", this is still a good and enjoyable science-fiction book.

In a future with new technologies but the same old problems about population and racism we find an idealistic politician, a mean business man (or two) and some sci-fi surprises. Don't want to reveal more!

Again, good plain science fiction to have a good reading time. ( )
  ivan.frade | Jul 7, 2014 |
ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature.

In Philip K. Dick??s The Crack in Space (1966), American technology and civilization has advanced so far that citizens can easily take a spaceship to make daily visits to an orbiting satellite whorehouse, personal Jifi-scuttlers are used to warp space/time so that people can quickly travel from home to work in a distant city, and overpopulation is such a public concern that millions of dispossessed Americans have chosen to be put in cryogenic storage until a habitable planet is discovered.

Yet, America has not advanced so far in other respects. Itƒ??s 2080, racism is still rampant, and Jim Briskin is hoping to be elected as the first African-American President. He needs to convince both the ƒ??Caucsƒ? and the ƒ??Colsƒ? (oh, what horrible nicknames!) that heƒ??s the best man for the job. This isnƒ??t always easy to do for a principled man who isnƒ??t willing to abandon his conservative ideals just to get the endorsement of the powerful mutant who controls the satellite broadcasts. It gets even harder when his white campaign manager defects to the other side and Briskin is now the target of assassination attempts.

But when a repairman discovers an alternate universe in his clientƒ??s broken Jifi-Scuttler, Jim Briskin sees a way that he can win the election ƒ?? by promising to send all the frozen people to inhabit the alternate Earth. Sure enough, in pure PKD style, the Americans quickly and unthinkingly embrace Briskinƒ??s crazy idea and off they go, heading for disaster!

The Crack in Space is related to one of my favorite PKD short stories: ƒ??Prominent Author,ƒ? in which weƒ??re introduced to the Jifi-scuttler. Dickƒ??s stories are always bizarrely entertaining. Theyƒ??re usually fast-paced and full of weird people with weird ideas doing weird things. In The Crack in Space, which contains a more straight-forward plot than many of his novels, we have a famous organ transplant doctor whoƒ??s divorcing his wife (an ƒ??abort-consultantƒ?) while hiding his mistress in a parallel universe. Where is Dr. Sands getting all the organs for his transplants? Then thereƒ??s George Walt, the man with two bodies (but only one head) who runs the orbiting whorehouse and wants to get rid of Jim Briskin because Briskin wants to shut him down. As usual, all the characters talk on vid phones, drink synthetic coffee, avoid the automatic reporters, get divorced, and worry about overpopulation.

The Crack in Space is fun, but not up to par with the best PKD offers. I donƒ??t know if Dick really imagined that in 2080 American race relations wouldnƒ??t have progressed beyond 1960s levels, but this really makes the novel feel more dated than his other works do. Also, the way that Americans dealt with the parallel universe was so simplistic and na??ve that this was hard to swallow, but yet itƒ??s so typical of PKD. Fans, who are used to his frenzied plots and other little writing quirks, are likely to just chuckle and let it go. In the end, though, thereƒ??s a beautiful ironic message. As Americans are dealing with race warfare, PKD shows us that, really, weƒ??re all human after all.

Brilliance Audio, who is gradually producing all of Philip K. Dickƒ??s novels in audio format, did another wonderful job with this one. Eric Dawe performs it superbly. ( )
  Kat_Hooper | Apr 6, 2014 |
There's a good chance that you know Philip K. Dick, if not by name, then by the movies his books and stories have spawned. He's that rare author with as many ten of his stories or novels adapted for the big screen, albeit posthumously. Think Blade Runner, starring Harrison Ford, an adaptation of Dick's brilliant Do androids dream of electric sheep? or Total Recall, with Arnold Schwarzenegger, from We Can Remember It For You Wholesale. More recent movies include The Adjustment Bureau and Minority Report.

Ironically, Dick lived his live in near poverty. As an homage to his influence, the Library of America included Dick in their "quasi-official national canon" in 2007, the first science-fiction writer to be included.

I was introduced to Dick through his movies and later picked up the novels and short stories they were based on. In contrast to much of what is classified as science-fiction, Dick's stories and novels focus on human nature and the effect of technology and science on our character and relationships.

The Crack in Space, written in 1966, tackles parallel universes, time travel, gaps in the time-space continuum, and, to make things interesting, racism.

Compared to some of his other novels, The Crack in Space is not the most exciting tale in the Philip K. Dick canon. In addition to a parallel universe, it weaves in the candidacy of a America's first black presidency. That's not so controversial now, but writing in the 1960s, during the civil rights movement, Dick was predicting what was then almost impossible to conceive. Other issues addressed include population growth and control, scarce resources, and the morality of sexual promiscuity. The story is interesting, if a bit dated. It''s a worthy, if not gripping, read for a quiet weekend. ( )
  publiusdb | Aug 22, 2013 |
In an overpopulated world, millions of people have elected to become bibs (cryogenically frozen until the job market opens up), abortion centers are prospering, and prostitution has been made legal on orbiting satellites (to ease "frustrations", while preventing pregnancy). It's a huge problem faced by the presidential candidates, who must present solutions to this problem if they are to be elected.

Jim Briskin announces in a public speech a possible solution. A company has stumbled upon a portal to a parallel world, apparently uninhabited, to which people can emigrate. This announcement opens a whole can of worms and new problems, especially when they find out the alternate world was not as unpopulated as they all thought.

Mixed in with all the population stuff are constant commentaries about race relations, most notably because Briskin, a Col, could be the first black president of the United States. I couldn't help but read this and think about the fact that President Obama is currently in the white house. The race question gets confounded even further once the people on alt-earth are discovered.

It's a fairly short read, and it goes very quick. But a lot gets packed into it, and there's a lot of jumping from character to character. Dick doesn't seem to be as interested in achieving an emotional connection with the reader as an intellectual one. You're not meant to feel for the characters or get to know them, you're meant to get a taste for their point of view. Every one's got an opinion, and the author presents many of them, so many that it's not entirely clear where he stands on anything. This is a thinking book, certainly fun, but one that I would like to sit with a book group and chat about. A reader could come at it from many angles -- each would be correct. ( )
2 vote andreablythe | Dec 4, 2012 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (6 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Dick, Philip K.Autorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Alpers, Hans JoachimPosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Alpers, Hans JoachimEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Darcie, Benjamin L.Narradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Eisele, MartinTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Moisan, ChristopherDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Moore, ChrisArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Roberts, TonyArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wöllzenmüller, FranzDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Das junge Paar, schwarzhaarig, dunkelhäutig, wahrscheinlich mexikanisch oder puertorikanisch, stand nervös an Herb Lackmores Theke, und der Junge, der Mann, sagte mit leiser Stimme: "Sir, wir möchten schlafengelegt werden. Wir möchten Flakkies werden."
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em alemão. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

It's the year 2080, and Earth's seemingly insurmountable overpopulation problem has been temporarily alleviated by placing millions of people in voluntary deep freeze. But in election year, the pressure is on to find a solution which will enable them to resume their lives. For Jim Briskin, Presidential candidate, it seems an insoluble problem - until a flaw in the new instantaneous travel system opens up the possibility of finding whole new worlds to colonise.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.22)
0.5 1
1
1.5 3
2 15
2.5 4
3 55
3.5 12
4 35
4.5 1
5 5

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 155,501,439 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível