Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

Winter (2017)

por Ali Smith

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

Séries: Seasonal Quartet (2)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
6754325,394 (3.91)143
Winter? Bleak. Frosty wind, earth as iron, water as stone, so the old song goes. The shortest days, the longest nights. The trees are bare and shivering. The summer's leaves? Dead litter. The world shrinks; the sap sinks. But winter makes things visible. And if there's ice, there'll be fire. In Ali Smith's Winter, lifeforce matches up to the toughest of the seasons. In this second novel in her acclaimed Seasonalcycle, the follow-up to her sensational Autumn, Smith's shape-shifting quartet of novels casts a merry eye over a bleak post-truth era with a story rooted in history, memory and warmth, its taproot deep in the evergreens- art, love, laughter. It's the season that teaches us survival. Here comes Winter.… (mais)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 143 menções

Inglês (39)  Holandês (2)  Francês (1)  Catalão (1)  Todas as línguas (43)
Mostrando 1-5 de 43 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
With Winter, I’m into my second season of Ali Smith’s seasonal quartet of books. I’m feeling addicted to the style of the writing in this series. Forget plot-driven novels with a firm chronology of happenings and a regular cast of characters that are always involved on the page. This volume does have four main characters and that almost feels overcrowded compared to the sparseness of Autumn. The cast includes the elderly Sophia Cleves, her sister Iris, her son Art, and a paid stand-in (an intellectual Croatian girl named Lux) playing Art’s former girlfriend, Charlotte.

You will never feel like Winter is a sequel to the first book, and while it does playfully dance with time again, showing the characters at very different points in their lives and relationships, these are very different folks from those in the first volume. So much of the attraction of this series to me is the way she creates a rather freeform feeling to them. It’s almost like you’re drifting in and out of a storyline, but I won’t hazard to explain the style beyond saying that the words on the page resemble poetry much of the time, with many spaces and lines that suddenly drop down to continue again. Still, I’m not going to speak to how Smith does what she does with these books, just know it’s masterful.

This season caught my attention immediately, with its first line. “God was dead: to begin with.” The book then goes on for a full page, simply listing many other things that were also dead. With that kickoff to the book, I doubt that many readers were then drifting or skimming the pages. Oh yeah, there is also a disembodied head as a character early on.

There are some stylistic similarities between the first two seasons, as Smith does have a thing for brainy female academics or near-academics, the aforementioned constant playful dance with time, and having young and very old characters beautifully interacting. With Winter she also introduced me to a couple of British artists: the painter Pauline Boty, and the artist and sculptor Barbara Hepworth. Nowadays there is such an ease to finding out so much more about these actual artists online, making the book an even richer experience. She also loves to write in an almost fantastical style, as though the book is drifting in and out of dreams.

Politics raises its head higher in this season than last, and I found that very interesting. In several of the book’s reviews, I noticed more gripes about the politics and several other aspects of this volume, but I found myself thoroughly engaged with the book from that first “God was dead” to its last sentence of “Art is Nature.” There’s a fascinating point in the book when the four characters are brought together in a sprawling house in Cornwall, where they then have a go at each other.

Unlike my feelings for the actual seasons, I found that this Winter was more enjoyable than Smith’s Autumn on the page. Possibly this is because I was hooked on her stylings from page one of this second book, and with the first book I had to learn to appreciate them. Whatever book works better for whoever, this series is an utterly original and enjoyable experience. And now, I’m starting Spring, very close to the real world’s seasonal change. ( )
  jphamilton | Apr 2, 2021 |
‘’God was dead: to begin with.
And romance was dead. Chivalry was dead.
Poetry, the novel, painting, they were all dead, and art was dead. Theatre and cinema were both dead. Literature was dead. The book was dead.’’

Winter. I concluded my first reading experience in Ali Smith’s universe on a day when the centre of Athens was covered in snow. Sun and snow in the heart of the capital, the first in almost 20 years. During a break in my teaching sessions - because Zoom is still going strong, damn it!- I looked outside my window as the snow was falling. Silence and children’s laughter. And I thought, why does winter fascinate us so much? What is it that makes it so special? Does it bring us together or drive us apart? In Ali Smith’s moving masterpiece, both happen. As in life itself.

‘’It can do this because it’s midwinter, which is a time of year when children and gods are meant to meet, when a child can speak to gods and gods are meant to listen, a time that’s about children and gods being related.’’

Sophie, Iris, Art, Lux. Four people trying to spend Christmas Day as peacefully as they can, trying to remain unscathed by their reluctant interaction. Small chance, really. Two sisters, as different as day and night, and two strangers that decided to follow one another, each one obeying a special motive. Memories come and go, past anger and regrets come to the surface. Who are they? What are they looking for? Where will this search end? Why don’t we listen but remain too much in love with our own voice? Moving back and forth to an eventful past and a frighteningly uncertain present, Ali Smith’s characters share their thoughts on age and obligations, dreams and reality, ghosts and the people that pass by in a flash, freedom and revolution and propriety. Love and anger.

In a world where money is all there is because we chose to make it so, in a country where Brexit is a reality, in a time when a madman enters the White House, one may feel like a piece of stone, heavy and still. Do we let others create a sculpture of us, projecting their image on ourselves? Or do we CHOOSE to grab the tools and break the mold? After the attack on the Capitol by a bunch of uneducated bigots/racists/all-around barbarians obeying a monster, the final pages in Smith’s masterpiece became all the more poignant.

‘’It’s winter, still. There’s no snow. There’s been almost none all winter. It’ll be one of the warmest winters on record, again.
Still, it’s colder in some places than others.
This morning there was frost on the ridges of the turned earth across the fields, frost the sun had melted on one side only.
Art in nature.’’

My reviews can also be found onhttps://theopinionatedreaderblog.wordpress.com/ ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Feb 19, 2021 |
I really love this book. I devoured it and will need to read it again, slowly. Look up the references I don't fully understand. Think more fully about the connections and ideas. Savour it! ( )
  porte01 | Jan 25, 2021 |
Après avoir lu plusieurs critiques enthousiastes sur Ali Smith, j’avais très envie de découvrir cette nouvelle plume anglaise (nouvelle au moins pour moi). J’avais bien lu que [Hiver] n’était pas aussi apprécié que son [Automne], mais l’éditeur l’offrant par l’entremise de netgalley, je ne pouvais résister, prête à me jeter sur [Automne] si cet opus me plaisait. Mais il n’en sera rien.
Hiver, ce sont des personnages qui se croisent. Art, sa mère Sophia, sa tante Iris et sa compagne d’un Noël, Lux. Qui se détestent, puis qui cohabitent sous le même toit pendant quelques jours, égrainant au fil des heures passées dans une solitude collective, des souvenirs plus ou moins récents, des blessures plutôt moins que plus guéries. Puis tout le monde repart et reprend son chemin, peut-être un peu grandi ou mûri. Tout cela servi par une écriture très travaillée, moderne et littéraire à la fois.
Tout cela devrait déboucher sur une note de lecture positive, voire enthousiaste, mais il n’en est rien, et c’est entièrement de ma faute. Le seul vrai reproche que je peux faire au livre, c’est sa fin optimiste, qui ne s’accorde pas au ton du livre et à la personnalité des protagonistes. Mais à part ce bémol, je ne peux que reconnaître les qualités de ce livre. C’est juste que ce n’est pas la littérature que j’aime. Trop moderne, trop déconstruite pour moi. Les irruptions d’articles de blog dans la lecture, les hallucinations ou les extravagances qui arrivent sans crier gare, qui parfois ne trouvent pas d’explications ou sont mêmes abandonnées en cours de roman (Qu’est devenue la tête que voit Sophia dans la première partie de l’histoire ? Disparue sans crier gare, et sans que je sois capable de donner un sens à cet épisode qui occupe pourtant quelques bonnes dizaines de pages.), non, vraiment, je ne m’y fais pas. J’aime comprendre ce que je lis, et là, j’ai l’impression de ne pas avoir les clefs pour accéder à cette compréhension.
Si cette lecture a été positive, c’est en me faisant prendre conscience de ce que j’aime dans les fictions modernes, et de pourquoi tout un pan de la littérature contemporaine ne trouve aucun écho en moi. Cela me permettra probablement de ne pas céder à certaines sirènes d’une nouveauté dans laquelle je ne me retrouve pas.
Mais malgré cette expérience plutôt négative pour moi, je finis cette note de lecture en reconnaissant à nouveau que cet échec est entièrement dû à la lectrice que je suis. Ali Smith, qui me semble encore assez méconnue en France, mérite d’être découverte par des lecteurs qui apprécient cette modernité de l’écriture et du sujet, qui aiment les romans où les personnages et leurs pensées sont au cœur de l’écriture, des personnages qui ont du mal à trouver une place et un équilibre dans notre monde actuel, un monde dont j’ai déjà en partie décroché, ce qui m’empêche d’éprouver l’empathie nécessaire à cette lecture.
  raton-liseur | Jan 23, 2021 |
És l’hivern. Quatre persones, desconeguts i família, convergeixen en una casa de quinze habitacions a Cornwall per passar el Nadal, però sembla que no hi ha lloc per a tothom. Una immigrant aporta la llum i l’escalfor que la família no ha sabut trobar unificant passat i present. Així és l’hivern, les coses es tornen visibles quan recordem com endurir-nos per després tornar flexiblement a la vida. ( )
  tonavallverdu | Jan 18, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 43 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Smith, Aliautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Grove, MelodyNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hockney, DavidArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Belongs to Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nor for the furious winter's rages.
William Shakespeare
Landscape directs its own images.
Barbara Hepworth
But if you believe you're a citizen of the world,
you're a citizen of nowhere.
Theresa May, 5 October 2016
We have returned the realm of mythology.
Muriel Spark
Darkness is cheap.
Charles Dickens
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Sarah Daniel
in the lion's den
with love
and for Sarah Wood
muß i' denn
with love
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
God was dead: to begin with.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Winter? Bleak. Frosty wind, earth as iron, water as stone, so the old song goes. The shortest days, the longest nights. The trees are bare and shivering. The summer's leaves? Dead litter. The world shrinks; the sap sinks. But winter makes things visible. And if there's ice, there'll be fire. In Ali Smith's Winter, lifeforce matches up to the toughest of the seasons. In this second novel in her acclaimed Seasonalcycle, the follow-up to her sensational Autumn, Smith's shape-shifting quartet of novels casts a merry eye over a bleak post-truth era with a story rooted in history, memory and warmth, its taproot deep in the evergreens- art, love, laughter. It's the season that teaches us survival. Here comes Winter.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.91)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 8
2.5 2
3 29
3.5 23
4 77
4.5 14
5 38

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 158,944,878 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível