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El profesor (Minus) (Spanish Edition) por…
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El profesor (Minus) (Spanish Edition) (original 1857; edição 2014)

por Charlotte Bronte (Autor), Gema Moral Bartolomé (Tradutor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,346385,028 (3.35)80
The hero of Charlotte Brontë's first novel escapes a dreary clerkship in industrial Yorkshire by taking a job as a teacher in Belgium. There, however, his entanglement with the sensuous but manipulative Zoraïde Reuter, complicates his affections for a penniless girl who is both teacher and pupil in Reuter's school. Also included in this edition is Emma, Charlotte Brontë's last, unfinished novel. Both works are drawn from the original Clarendon texts.… (mais)
Membro:comunaliteraria
Título:El profesor (Minus) (Spanish Edition)
Autores:Charlotte Bronte (Autor)
Outros autores:Gema Moral Bartolomé (Tradutor)
Informação:Alba Editorial (2014), 392 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

The Professor por Charlotte Brontë (1857)

  1. 20
    Hard Times por Charles Dickens (CurrerBell)
    CurrerBell: The Professor and Hard Times don't have all that much in common — and even less so do CB and CD have that much in common — but there's an interesting conversational exchange in The Professor, in the last chapter but one, that reminds me of the "reason vs. sensibility" theme in Hard Times.… (mais)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 38 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This is an unexpectedly good read, principally because of Bronte's writing. Her writing is very descriptive and rich, for lack of a better word. It is as if she wanted to test her prowess. I enjoyed it but if the story had been longer, the writing would probably become tiresome. What I don't like is Crimsworth's condescending attitude towards women, almost all he had issues with except his wife. ( )
  siok | Nov 4, 2021 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot, & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission
Title: The Professor
Series: ----------
Author: Charlotte Bronte
Rating: 3 of 5 Stars
Genre: Romance, Classic?
Pages: 323
Words: 87K

Synopsis:

From Wikipedia

The novel is the story of a young man, William Crimsworth, and is a first-person narrative from his perspective. It describes his maturation, his career as a teacher in Brussels, and his personal relationships.

The story starts with a letter William has sent to his friend Charles, detailing his rejection of his uncle's proposal that he become a clergyman, as well as his first meeting with his rich brother Edward. Seeking work as a tradesman, William is offered the position of a clerk by Edward. However, Edward is jealous of William's education and intelligence, and treats him terribly. Through the actions of the sympathetic Mr Hunsden, William is relieved of his post, but starts a new job at a boys' boarding school in Belgium.

The school is run by the friendly Monsieur Pelet, who treats William kindly and politely. Soon William's merits as a "professor" reach the ears of the headmistress of the neighbouring girls' school. Mademoiselle Reuter offers him a position at her school, which he accepts. Initially captivated by her, William begins to entertain ideas of falling in love with her, but then he overhears her and Monsieur Pelet talking about their upcoming marriage and their deceitful treatment of him.

William begins to treat Mademoiselle Reuter with cold civility as he sees her underlying nature. She, however, continues to try to draw him back in by pretending to be benevolent and concerned. She asks him to teach one of her young teachers, Frances, who hopes to improve her skill in languages. William sees promising intelligence in this pupil and slowly begins to fall in love with her.

Jealous of the attention Frances is receiving from William, Mademoiselle Reuter takes it upon herself to dismiss Frances from her post and to hide her address from William. After a long search he re-encounters Frances in a graveyard and they renew their acquaintance.

It is revealed that as she was trying to make herself amiable in William's eyes, Mademoiselle Reuter had accidentally fallen in love with him herself. Not wanting to cause a conflict with Monsieur Pelet, William leaves his establishment.

William gets a new position as a "professor" at a college, allowing him and Frances to marry. The two eventually open a school together and have a child. After achieving financial security the family travels around England and then settles in the countryside, near to Mr Hunsden.

My Thoughts:

Villette was actually next in this omnibus edition of the Bronte's but since I've already read it twice and my second read was not nearly as enjoyable as the first time, I didn't want to read it, so I simply skipped it.

The Professor is a nice little story about how a woman thinks a man's life would go. While there ARE such introspective and delicate men as William, it really seemed dialed up past whatever I've ever seen in a guy. Maybe I'm not observant enough but it seemed to me that the story would have been served better if William had been Wilhelmina and she had met Frank instead of Frances. Getting inside a guy's head is not nearly as complicated as Bronte makes the process.

This was quintessential Romance and as such had all of the baggage that goes along with that genre. I can handle old school romance but I was thankful that this was under 400 pages and not a monster like Shirley.

In food terms, this book felt like plain pancakes with a pat of butter on it. If I hadn't read a book for a month (I can't think of a situation where that could happen any more, but it technically “could”) I probably would have devoured this and asked for more; just like when you are hungry, pancakes really hit the spot. But as I am a gourmand and nearly a glutton in terms of books I simply eat this one and say “next!”. Po' little ol' me! Pity me....

★★★☆☆ ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Oct 13, 2021 |
This was a terrible book. The main character was infuriatingly supercilious and completely convinced of his own superiority. He doesn't even bother to teach well but frequently mentions that he doesn't challenge his students because he doesn't think they'll bother to learn, when it was his job to make them want to learn. I was very disappointed when Frances accepted his proposal since she was the only character that wasn't totally horrible, and she didn't deserve to be dominated by this awful man. I was truly surprised when Mr. Crimsworth allowed her to keep working and teaching. It seemed very out of character for him given his habit of demanding everyone do what he want or he would treat them with veiled contempt, and he told Frances repeatedly that he wanted to provide for her and didn't give it up until she insisted she work.

Miss Brontë also expects her reader to understand French. She expected this in Jane Eyre as well, but as only the exchanges with Adele, which never contained anything important, where I really was under the impression I was missing important information in this book.

These things led to me not particularly enjoying the book, but the final nail in the coffin was Mr. Crimsworth's absolute raging anti-Catholicism. It's hard to read the prospective of a prejudiced character at any time, but especially when he or she refuses to learn better or admit his discrimination. I also thought it was horribly hypocritical of Charlotte Brontë to claim that all Catholic girls and women are wicked seducers with no sense of morality considering her own infatuation with a married man who was her teacher. I don't usually listen to classic audiobooks at more than 1.5 as the recordings tend to be less clear and the language sometimes takes time to digest and understand, but I found myself so impatient to be done with this book that I listened to it at twice the speed starting from about half way through, and sometimes even ventured to 2.15 in my eagerness to be done with the torture. I probably should have just DNFed it, but I do hate leaving books incomplete.

I don't know how Charlotte went from writing this monstrosity to writing the wonderful Jane Eyre, but I'm very glad that I read this after Jane Eyre or I probably wouldn't have ventured to read another of Charlotte Brontë's books. ( )
  ComposingComposer | Jan 12, 2021 |
The Professor
In one sense, this is exactly what you would expect from the author of Jane Eyre - a romance in which the characters have no particularly good looks and prize mutual respect, intelligence, education and moral rectitude (according to Charlotte's views on the latter). In every other respect it's rather surprising: it's short; the hero's a bit unpleasant (his faith in national stereotypes is rather obnoxious); there's nothing GofficK or sensationalist to the plot; "happily ever after" is actually described! Nevertheless it could have been shorter, still - way too much time is spent dissing the French and Flemish school-girls to very little purpose except to show our hero as Master in his own class room - and the romance, once a misdirection is passed, is entirely predictable. The real fun comes every time Hunsden intervenes. Sarcastic, sardonic, abusive, interfering, mysterious, possibly revolutionary Hunsden. Charlotte should have written a book about him! Imagine a political thriller by a Bronte! And since there is much here supporting the concept of meritocracy and challenging conventional stratified class roles and social immobility, why not? There are hints here of what Hardy would take up later in the century.

Oh, well - plainly it wasn't to be. I have Shirley and Villette (which apparently reworks much of what is in The Professor) still to go and like Jane Eyre, they are somewhat daunting bricks. I'm actually now more interested in the juvinalia and somewhat curious about the poetry.

Emma
An interesting mystery comes to light just in time for Charlotte to give up writing novels... ( )
  Arbieroo | Jul 17, 2020 |
It’s clear this is Charlotte’s first effort at writing a novel. Yet I’m glad I read it, because you can see the seeds of her talent in the way she crafts sentences. I do think the story of a teacher in Brussels is stronger when she reworks it from the female point of view in Villette.

The main character is a bit insufferable and annoying. The romance fell flat for me as I never understood what Frances saw in him. Regardless, it’s Brontë, so it’s worth reading.

“In sunshine, in prosperity, the flowers are very well; but how many wet days are there in life—November seasons of disaster, when a man’s hearth and home would be cold indeed, without the clear, cheering gleam of intellect.” ( )
  bookworm12 | Mar 17, 2020 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (22 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Brontë, Charlotteautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Glen, HeatherEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pyne, GeorgeArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rosengarten, HerbertEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Smith, MargaretEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tute, GeorgeIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ward, Mary A. [Mrs Humphry]Introduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wilson, Marionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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The other day, in looking over my papers, I found in my desk the following copy of a letter sent by me a year since to an old school acquaintance: - 'DEAR CHARLES, - I think when you and I were at Eton together, we were neither of us what could be called popular characters; you were a sarcastic, observant, shrewd, cold-blooded creature; my own portrait I will not attempt to draw, but I cannot recollect that it was a strikingly attractive one - can you?
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The hero of Charlotte Brontë's first novel escapes a dreary clerkship in industrial Yorkshire by taking a job as a teacher in Belgium. There, however, his entanglement with the sensuous but manipulative Zoraïde Reuter, complicates his affections for a penniless girl who is both teacher and pupil in Reuter's school. Also included in this edition is Emma, Charlotte Brontë's last, unfinished novel. Both works are drawn from the original Clarendon texts.

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