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Civilisations: How Do We Look/The Eye of Faith: As seen on TV [Mar 01, 2018] Beard, Mary

por Mary Beard

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Séries: Civilisations (book 1)

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Companion to the major new BBC documentary series CIVILISATIONS, presented by Mary Beard, David Olusoga and Simon SchamaThe idea of 'civilisation' has always been debated, even fought over. At the heart of those debates lies the big question of how people - from prehistory to the present day - have depicted themselves and others, both human and divine. Distinguished historian Mary Beard explores how art has shaped, and been shaped by, the people who created it. How have we looked at these images? Why have they sometimes been so contentious? In Part One, she examines how the human figure was portrayed in some of the earliest art in the world - from the gigantic stone heads carved by the Olmec of Central America to the statues and pottery of the ancient Greeks to the terracotta army of the first emperor of China. And she explains how one particular version of representing the human body, which goes back to the ancient world, still influences (and sometimes distorts) how people in the West see their own culture and that of others. Throughout this story, she is concerned not only with the artists who made images, but with those who have used them, viewed them and interpreted them. In other words: How Do We Look? In Part Two, Mary Beard turns to the relationship between art and religion. For centuries, religion has inspired art: from the Hindu temple at Angkor Wat to the Christian mosaics of Ravenna to the exquisite calligraphy of Islamic mosques. But making the divine visible in the human world has never been simple. All religions have wrestled with idolatry and iconoclasm, destroying art as well as creating it - and asking how to look with The Eye of Faith.… (mais)
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In this third and fourth installment of the BBC's Civilizations series, classic historian Mary Beard tackles two themes: how we all view art in very different ways, and how both religion and art itself have always grappled with the challenge of giving the divine a visual form. These are two extremely interesting perspectives. Unfortunately, this booklet does not live up to its ambition: Beard presents a succession of very short pieces in which things are discussed very superficially; this book is nothing more than a written television script. Also, her promise to put more women in the spotlight and to shift the focus from the artist to the art consumer is also only partially fulfilled. But just like in the first two parts, by David Olusoga, Beard is definitely sliding away from Kenneth Clark's Eurocentric gaze, and that's definitely a plus. ( )
  bookomaniac | Jan 9, 2021 |
Toda civilización se configura en torno a unas imágenes compartidas colectivamente. Sus miembros se caracterizan por un modo peculiar de ver el mundo en que viven, de modo que la diferencia de las percepciones marca la diversidad de cada civilización. Mary Beard lo ilustra con una doble y fascinante exploración. La primera parte se refiere al arte del cuerpo: a las diversas visiones del cuerpo humano a través del tiempo y del espacio, desde las gigantescas estatuas de los faraones a los guerreros de terracota de China. La segunda aborda un tema todavía más complejo: el de las imágenes de Dios y de los dioses. Y nos lleva a una reflexión acerca de los problemas que todas las religiones, antiguas o modernas, han tenido para representar lo divino. Su propósito es mostrarnos cómo la diferencia de las percepciones de lo que vemos marca la diversidad de las civilizaciones.
  bibliotecayamaguchi | May 29, 2019 |
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Klynne, AllanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Civilisations (book 1)
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Companion to the major new BBC documentary series CIVILISATIONS, presented by Mary Beard, David Olusoga and Simon SchamaThe idea of 'civilisation' has always been debated, even fought over. At the heart of those debates lies the big question of how people - from prehistory to the present day - have depicted themselves and others, both human and divine. Distinguished historian Mary Beard explores how art has shaped, and been shaped by, the people who created it. How have we looked at these images? Why have they sometimes been so contentious? In Part One, she examines how the human figure was portrayed in some of the earliest art in the world - from the gigantic stone heads carved by the Olmec of Central America to the statues and pottery of the ancient Greeks to the terracotta army of the first emperor of China. And she explains how one particular version of representing the human body, which goes back to the ancient world, still influences (and sometimes distorts) how people in the West see their own culture and that of others. Throughout this story, she is concerned not only with the artists who made images, but with those who have used them, viewed them and interpreted them. In other words: How Do We Look? In Part Two, Mary Beard turns to the relationship between art and religion. For centuries, religion has inspired art: from the Hindu temple at Angkor Wat to the Christian mosaics of Ravenna to the exquisite calligraphy of Islamic mosques. But making the divine visible in the human world has never been simple. All religions have wrestled with idolatry and iconoclasm, destroying art as well as creating it - and asking how to look with The Eye of Faith.

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