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Convenience Store Woman (2016)

por Sayaka Murata

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,4151139,762 (3.77)148
Keiko Furukura had always been considered a strange child, and her parents always worried how she would get on in the real world, so when she takes on a job in a convenience store while at university, they are delighted for her. For her part, in the convenience store she finds a predictable world mandated by the store manual, which dictates how the workers should act and what they should say, and she copies her coworkers' style of dress and speech patterns so that she can play the part of a normal person. However, eighteen years later, at age 36, she is still in the same job, has never had a boyfriend, and has only few friends. She feels comfortable in her life, but is aware that she is not living up to society's expectations and causing her family to worry about her. When a similarly alienated but cynical and bitter young man comes to work in the store, he will upset Keiko's contented stasis--but will it be for the better?… (mais)
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Inglês (102)  Alemão (3)  Espanhol (2)  Piratês (1)  Francês (1)  Finlandês (1)  Dinamarquês (1)  Italiano (1)  Todas as línguas (112)
Mostrando 1-5 de 112 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Biting social commentary on conformism, narrated from (unacknowledged) Autistic perspective.

The visual imagery is rich and descriptive--transporting me back to Japan, wandering the aisles of FamilyMart, everything appearing sterile under the bright, white light. Reminding me of small details that I didn't quite notice before (POP ads for this week's special).

It's a short read. A small platform for the quotidian moments of life, which to me, the sum of which are more life-changing. Indeed, in a life that's full of flux and spontaneity, the Japanese convenience store is dependable.

Everytime I'm in Haneda, I find relief in the Familymart, in the form of onigiri. box of juice, and last-minute omiyage (of course, the typical regional Pocky/Pretz/Kit-Kat. Tokyo Banana if you're lucky).

This brought back those moments, and reminded me that they're not so insignificant. ( )
  ShelfAwareness | Jun 19, 2021 |
"The normal world has no room for exceptions and always quietly eliminates foreign objects. Anyone who is lacking is disposed of". This is from the mind of a young woman who, since childhood, has had to work very hard to erase her personality in order to blend in, and who, finally, "pulled it off" being a "person". A novel that, at times, is frank to the point of absurdity, but which is also great food for thought. Japanese society (if not society in general as well) is criticized here in a very poignant way. ( )
1 vote Clara53 | May 27, 2021 |
Swallow this novel whole and let it linger...the implications it sets up about society, expectations, work, femininity, relationships, deception, peer pressure, practicality, and identity are complex and a more than a little disturbing. The style, details, and characters capture the mood perfectly. ( )
1 vote Raechill | May 4, 2021 |
More a long short story than a novel. Some cutting (though mostly obvious) social commentary, some laugh-out-loud deadpan (e.g., smooth baby skin likened to a blister, the homeless beard as pet comparison). The fact that the book struck a chord so strongly in current Japanese society is more interesting than the book itself. Nonetheless worth reading for the occasional comedic gems and laconic observations on Japanese social norms. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
There have been a few books that attempt to show what life is like for people on the autism disorder spectrum. Two that immediately spring to mind are The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon and The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion but there are others as well. However the ones I've read all concern people who speak English. This is the first one that shows a person who lives and works in a non-English society.

Keiko Furukuru is 36 years old and has worked at the same convenience store for half of her life. She has always known she is different. The way she views the world and how she reacts to it is at odds with others in her family and her school as she is growing up. Her sister has assisted her to get along but it is learned behaviour, not instinctive. When she starts working at a convenience store the instruction manual and training is a godsend for her. She becomes an ideal employee. Then a man is hired to help in the store and Keiko tries to teach him the ropes but Shiraha isn't really interested in doing the job well. He is approximately Keiko's age but he is perpetually unemployed and low on funds. When he is fired from the convenience store he starts hanging around and Keiko takes pity on him. She invites him to her very small apartment and he continues to stay there letting Keiko support both of them on her small salary. It suits Keiko though because she has been facing more pressure from family and friends to get married. In Japan a woman of Keiko's age should be married and having children. However she is soon expected to quit her job and when she tells her manager he is actually delighted since it shows Keiko is conforming to expectations. The couple can't survive for long without money coming in but Shiraha has no intention of looking for a job so he starts scouring job ads for a job for Keiko. But for Keiko the convenience store is the ideal job for her and on the way to a job interview she stops in at another store which she soon starts to organize and put to rights.

The author worked in a convenience store which probably gave her lots of fodder for this book. I admit that I was quite intrigued with how detailed the set up of the store and the expectations for the workers was. Japanese convenience stores seem to be a whole level above our 7-Elevens. ( )
  gypsysmom | May 1, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 112 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
...for all the disturbance and oddity in “Convenience Store Woman,” the book dares the reader to interpret it as a happy story about a woman who has managed to craft her own “good life.”
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarThe New Yorker, Katy Waldman (Jun 21, 2018)
 
Convenience Store Woman closely observes the inevitable failures of a society to embrace all within it, and the contrasting ways disenfranchised men and women manage to cope... Through the eyes of perceptive, dispassionate Keiko, the ways in which we’re all commodified and reduced to our functions become clear. What’s unclear is what other option we have. We all want to be individuals, and yet we also want to fit in somewhere. We all want to be seen for our own intangible humanity, and yet we see others for their utility.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarHuffington Post, Claire Fallon (Jun 12, 2018)
 
Murata’s slim and stunning Akutagawa Prize–winning novel follows 36-year-old Keiko Furukura, who has been working at the same convenience store for the last 18 years, outlasting eight managers and countless customers and coworkers.... Murata’s smart and sly novel, her English-language debut, is a critique of the expectations and restrictions placed on single women in their 30s. This is a moving, funny, and unsettling story about how to be a “functioning adult” in today’s world
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarPublishers Weekly (Apr 9, 2018)
 
A sly take on modern work culture and social conformism, told through one woman’s 18-year tenure as a convenience store employee.... Murata provides deceptively sharp commentary on the narrow social slots people—particularly women—are expected to occupy and how those who deviate can inspire bafflement, fear, or anger in others.... A unique and unexpectedly revealing English language debut.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarKirkus Reviews (Mar 20, 2018)
 
In Sayaka Murata’s “Convenience Store Woman,” a small, elegant and deadpan novel from Japan, a woman senses that society finds her strange, so she culls herself from the herd before anyone else can do it. She becomes an anonymous, long-term employee of the Hiiromachi Station Smile Mart, a convenience store, a kiosk for her floating soul...“Convenience Store Woman” has touched a chord in Japan, where it has sold close to 600,000 copies....I have mixed feelings about “Convenience Store Woman,” but there is no doubt that it is a thrifty and offbeat exploration of what we must each leave behind to participate in the world.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Sayaka Murataautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Bornas, MarinaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Coci, GianlucaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Emond, VibekeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gräfe, UrsulaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Holm, MetteTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nolla, AlbertTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tamae-Bouhon, MathildeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tapley Takemori, GinnyTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Van Haute, LukTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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A convenience store is a world of sound.
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But so far as I could see, aside from a few minor differences they were all just an animal called a baby and looked much the same, just like stray cats all looked much the same.
I find the shape of people's eyes particularly interesting when they’re being condescending. I see a wariness or a fear of being contradicted or sometimes a belligerent spark ready to jump on any attack.  And if they’re unaware of being condescending, their glazed-over eyeballs are steeped in a fluid mix of ecstasy and a sense of superiority.
...you should really either get a job or get married, one or the other...Or better still, you should do both.
I couldn’t stop hearing the store telling me the way it wanted to be, what it needed.  It was all flowing into me. It wasn’t me speaking. It was the store. I was just channeling its revelations from on high
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Keiko Furukura had always been considered a strange child, and her parents always worried how she would get on in the real world, so when she takes on a job in a convenience store while at university, they are delighted for her. For her part, in the convenience store she finds a predictable world mandated by the store manual, which dictates how the workers should act and what they should say, and she copies her coworkers' style of dress and speech patterns so that she can play the part of a normal person. However, eighteen years later, at age 36, she is still in the same job, has never had a boyfriend, and has only few friends. She feels comfortable in her life, but is aware that she is not living up to society's expectations and causing her family to worry about her. When a similarly alienated but cynical and bitter young man comes to work in the store, he will upset Keiko's contented stasis--but will it be for the better?

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