Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

This Mournable Body (2018)

por Tsitsi Dangarembga

Séries: Nervous Conditions (3)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1838114,296 (3.23)53
"Anxious about her prospects after leaving a stagnant job, Tambudzai finds herself living in a run-down youth hostel in downtown Harare. For reasons that include her grim financial prospects and her age, she moves to a widow's boarding house and eventually finds work as a biology teacher. But at every turn in her attempt to make a life for herself, she is faced with a fresh humiliation, until the painful contrast between the future she imagined and her daily reality ultimately drives her to a breaking point. In This Mournable Body, Tsitsi Dangarembga returns to the protagonist of her acclaimed first novel, Nervous Conditions, to examine how the hope and potential of a young girl and a fledgling nation can sour over time and become a bitter and floundering struggle for survival. As a last resort, Tambudzai takes an ecotourism job that forces her to return to her parents' impoverished homestead. It is this homecoming, in Dangarembga's tense and psychologically charged novel, that culminates in an act of betrayal, revealing just how toxic the combination of colonialism and capitalism can be."--Amazon.com.… (mais)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 53 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 8 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I haven't read the winner of the 2020 Booker Prize yet, but it must have been spectacularly good to have been chosen instead of the shortlisted This Mournable Body by Zimbabwean author Tsitsi Dangarembga. It's one of those books that makes me wish that all my reading were as worthwhile.

The novel tells the story of one woman's moral decay and decline into poverty and is emblematic of Zimbabwe's postcolonial debacle. So it could have been a melancholy book, but witty asides and black humour lighten the tone. At the same time, it's also a painfully honest examination of the deluded visions of Zimbabwe's leadership and the corrupt state of the nation and body politic.

Tambudzai (Tambu) is a thirty-something Zimbabwean down on her luck. And it's not her fault: she was uplifted from rural poverty by an uncle who enabled her education but despite her degree she can't get work and she can't get ahead. Progress towards a better life and success are a mirage.

Tired of being paid a miserable wage while men took credit for the work she did, she imprudently resigned from her job in an advertising agency. When the novel opens she is exhausting her meagre savings in a rundown hostel where she is past her use-by date because the hostel is for young women, and she is no longer young.

Very soon the reader is drawn into the moral collapse that represents the morass into which Zimbabwe has fallen. Tambu goes for a job interview as secretary for the Widow Riley but is refused entrance by a wily servant who perceives that Tambu will displace her. Discouraged yet again, Tambu goes home in anger that expresses itself when a mob turns on one of the girls from the hostel, a flashy, sexy good-time-girl called Gertrude. I don't know whether the image of Tambu standing ready to cast a stone is a Biblical allusion to shared guilt or if that's me imposing a colonial interpretation on a traditional Zimbabwean way of 'disciplining' unruly young women who depart from patriarchal standards of behaviour. But either way the scene skewers the reader into being complicit. On the one hand Tambu is addressing herself; on the other, the second-person 'you' is the reader—both the postcolonial Zimbabwean who wilfully refuses to take responsibility for the descent into mob rule and the wider world which looks away, helpless to intervene in affairs for which under colonialism it was the bedrock but which it now no longer controls.
Her mouth is a pit. She is pulling you in. You do not want her to entomb you. You drop your gaze but do not walk off because on the one hand you are hemmed in by the crowd. On the other if you return to solitude you will fall back inside yourself where there is no place to hide. (p.24)
Justification comes easily:
You did not want to do what you did at the market. You did not want all that to happen, nor did anyone else. No one wanted it. It is just something that took place like that, like a moment of madness. (p.28)

To read the rest of my review please visit https://anzlitlovers.com/2021/02/13/this-mournable-body-by-tsitsi-dangarembga/ ( )
  anzlitlovers | Feb 13, 2021 |
I had to quit this book because the main characters depression was too realistic and depressing, couldn’t face reading any more. Nothing redeeming happened in the first half of the book so, no thank you.
( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
I think it was the American literary critic Harold Bloom who once stated that the ultimate criterion for great literature was characters evolving throughout the novel, poem, or play: at the end they have to be no longer the same as at the beginning. If that's right, then this novel by the Zimbabwean writer Tsiti Dangarembga (° 1959) is an absolute success.

We get to know main character Tambudzai Sigauke (Tambu) when she is looking for work and permanent shelter in the capital Harare. At this point she already has quite a background: relieved that she was able to escape her rural village through successful studies, she worked for a while in a flashy advertising agency, but left that office after apparent racial and gender-related discrimination; and now she is in a desperate condition while her family back home counts on her support. Her experiences have made Tambu a fragile, very insecure personality, while at the same time still cherishing the ambition to prove herself. Throughout this novel, we will see Tambu's star rising and falling, as a result of both unexpectedly prosperous and predictably dramatic events, eventually ending in a form of resignation.

Dangarembga aptly describes the difficult living and working conditions in Zimbabwe, which still is marked by the war of independence (veterans play a rather nasty role in this novel), by remnants of the colonial regime (in practice whites remain in the lead), and due to the rotting corruption of the current regime ('the old crocodile' is mentioned once, needless to say who this refers to). But above all, this novel shows how a fragile personality can be crushed by a particular culture, such as the ubiquitous macho-sexism, by structures that aim for cheap money, and by old family traditions that impose obligations, etc. It is one of the great achievements of this novel that it offers a complex cocktail of these elements, within many intermingling layers.

It’s the prudent resilience of Tambu that makes this novel stand out: she constantly ends up into trouble, regularly collapses under the pressure, but she also manages to surpass this, or at least adapt to her difficulties. It's a great example of female empowerment. And the great merit of Dangaremgba is that she did not turn this into a cheap feel-good story (along the lines of for instance The Color Purple): even in the end, Tambu remains vulnerable and insecure, albeit to some extent purified.

From a literary point of view, this novel is a bit precarious: there’s a succession of brilliant and slightly dragging passages, and especially at the end the story unwinds a bit too quickly. But it's mainly through the narrative point of view, - the author constantly addressing Tambu in the you-form (very unusual in literature) -, that Dangarembga succeeds in arousing our involvement as a reader and our sympathy with the fragile Tambu. I think this novel was rightly placed on the Short List of the Booker Prize. ( )
  bookomaniac | Dec 4, 2020 |
I was incredibly disappointed in this book which I listened to instead of read. The narrator, Adenrele Ojo, actually did a pretty good job of narrating it and at least I didn't waste valuable reading time on the book. I saw that this book was picked for the 2020 Booker Prize shortlist. That was my main motivation for listeneing to it and for continuing to listen to it. Otherwise I think I would have ditched it after a few hours of trying to get into it; I figured the Booker Prize jury must have seen something in it. Whatever that was it escaped me.

This novel is the conclusion of a trilogy set in Zimbabwe. The first two books take place around the War for Indipendence but this one is set 20 years later. The main character, Tambudza. quit her job at a public relations agency in Harare when she discovered that white males were taking credit for her work. Now in her 40s Tambu is finding it hard to find another job and she is living in a run-down boarding house with little money for food. Eventually she gets a job teaching at a girls' school but her mental health issues cause her to have a violent outburst against one of the students. She then spends some time in an asylum from which her cousin frees her, bringing her to her own house to rest and recuperate. Then, one day Tembu runs into her old boss Tracey who has started an eco-tourism business. Tracey offers Tembu a job there which Tembu accepts. The job comes with a good salary and free accommodation but Tembu continues to have emotional issues that threaten her employment. When it is suggested by Tracey that she set up a tourist destination at her family's village Tembu agrees even though she has not been back there for years. Her relationships with her mother, father, sister and nieces are problematic and, in the end, Tembu must leave her job and her village with no clear path for her future.

This whole novel is written from the second person point of view which was obviously a deliberate choice by the author but it just didn't work for me. It kept me from feeling any empathy for Tembu since she seemed so distant. I read in another review that they found the second person POV put them in the other person's shoes but that was not my experience. I also found that the discussions of Tembu's mental and emotional problems were left without any resolution which was frustrating and unsatisfactory. Perhaps if I had read the other two books I would have been able to see the bigger themes that the author was trying to explore but this book is not enough to let me do that. ( )
  gypsysmom | Nov 17, 2020 |
This second-person tale of a floundering and embittered Zimbabwean woman started off well enough. While it was never a riveting or emotional read, the first several chapters kept me interested. Unfortunately, I felt like nothing about this novel moved in an upward motion. The protagonist's actions were a never-ending series of blunders resulting in tedious events. Too much of a slog. Best part: the excellent snapshot of modern day Zimbabwe. ( )
1 vote chrisblocker | Oct 27, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 8 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

Belongs to Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"Anxious about her prospects after leaving a stagnant job, Tambudzai finds herself living in a run-down youth hostel in downtown Harare. For reasons that include her grim financial prospects and her age, she moves to a widow's boarding house and eventually finds work as a biology teacher. But at every turn in her attempt to make a life for herself, she is faced with a fresh humiliation, until the painful contrast between the future she imagined and her daily reality ultimately drives her to a breaking point. In This Mournable Body, Tsitsi Dangarembga returns to the protagonist of her acclaimed first novel, Nervous Conditions, to examine how the hope and potential of a young girl and a fledgling nation can sour over time and become a bitter and floundering struggle for survival. As a last resort, Tambudzai takes an ecotourism job that forces her to return to her parents' impoverished homestead. It is this homecoming, in Dangarembga's tense and psychologically charged novel, that culminates in an act of betrayal, revealing just how toxic the combination of colonialism and capitalism can be."--Amazon.com.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.23)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 8
3.5 2
4 4
4.5
5 2

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 158,923,525 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível