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Lord Of Light (S.F. MASTERWORKS) por Roger…
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Lord Of Light (S.F. MASTERWORKS) (original 1967; edição 1999)

por Roger Zelazny (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4,457951,898 (4.04)154
Imagine a distant world where gods walk as men, but wield vast and hidden powers. Here they have made the stage on which they build a subtle pattern of alliance, love, and deadly enmity. Are they truly immortal? Who are these gods who rule the destiny of a teeming world? Their names include Brahma, Kali, Krishna and also he who was called Buddha, the Lord of Light, but who now prefers to be known simply as Sam. The gradual unfolding of the story -- how the colonization of another planet became a re-enactment of Eastern mythology -- is one of the great imaginative feats of modern science fiction.… (mais)
Membro:Ken_Lumley
Título:Lord Of Light (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
Autores:Roger Zelazny (Autor)
Informação:Gollancz (1999), Edition: New Ed, 320 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Lord of Light por Roger Zelazny (1967)

  1. 61
    The Lathe of Heaven por Ursula K. Le Guin (storyjunkie)
    storyjunkie: Both books carry a philosophical weight to their world-saving. A similar atmosphere to their protagonists, worlds, and occupancy of a more soul-searching lot in the science fiction spectrum make them nicely complementary to each other.
  2. 20
    Creatures of Light and Darkness por Roger Zelazny (PMaranci)
    PMaranci: Another award-winning novel by Roger Zelazny in which science fiction and classic Earth mythology intertwine.
  3. 20
    The Left Hand of Darkness por Ursula K. Le Guin (WildMaggie)
  4. 00
    The Quantum Thief por Hannu Rajaniemi (Lucy_Skywalker)
  5. 11
    The Years of Rice and Salt por Kim Stanley Robinson (LamontCranston)
  6. 00
    Gather, Darkness! por Fritz Leiber (LamontCranston)
    LamontCranston: The same premise of advanced science mimicking religion
  7. 00
    Shield por Poul Anderson (MinaKelly)
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    WebMage por Kelly McCullough (aqualectrix)
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    Cybermancy por Kelly McCullough (aqualectrix)
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    Silverlock por John Myers Myers (boneslv)
    boneslv: It also has many famous literary characters in it.
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» Ver também 154 menções

Inglês (93)  Espanhol (1)  Italiano (1)  Todas as línguas (95)
Mostrando 1-5 de 95 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A zany and learned book that warns would-be gods about why people end up killing their gods, either philosophically or physically, and manages to capture some of the interpersonal reflections of peoples' intentions and responses that Zelazny was probably studying in his own life. A basic knowledge of hinduism and buddhism are suggested, as this book --smartly --is not presented as a course in hinduism for westerners.
In terms of reading this book as part of the transition from old-school, WWII sci-fi and the next generation, I think Zelazny's work fits neatly in with Delany, LeGuin, Dick and Tiptree as a study in how they all started out using older sci-fi tropes (which I personally find intolerably corny --laser guns and shit) to get people to read their much finer, next-level ideas. As others have mentioned, the book's structure is wheel-like and the writing is generally informed by literature and philology, using escapist sci-fi form but in no way bound to escapist sci-fi mentality. Dig it! ( )
  EugenioNegro | Mar 17, 2021 |
Has thoughts of being science fiction, but then goes all Xanthian and gives everyone a single magical talent. I mean totally science based, but sufficiently advanced talent. Where you can only have one and each is distinct.
  valhikes | Nov 26, 2020 |
Hindu & Buddhist mythology IN SPAAAACE is an okay plug. Not much else to recommend this.

Another Dimension discussion notes: http://positronchicago.blogspot.com/2016/03/another-dimension-lord-of-light.html ( )
  jakecasella | Sep 21, 2020 |
Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. 1967. Harper, 2010.
Roger Zelazny won a Hugo and was nominated for a Nebula for Lord of Light, a book that was well ahead of its time. I was reminded to reread it by reading Philip Pullman’s Dark Materials series in which quantum entangled particles connect multiple worlds. In Lord of Light consciousnesses can be transferred to an orbiting particle cloud, not unlike the Van Allen radiation belt discovered in 1958. In the middle of the Vietnam War, Zelazny has his hero Sam introduce a scientifically supported form of Buddhism to rebel against the Hindu caste system established by the survivors of the starship The Star of India. If you like a mash-up of science fiction and mythology, you can’t do better than revisiting Roger Zelazny. ( )
  Tom-e | Aug 17, 2020 |
Lord of Light is, to put it simply, one of the greatest Sci-fi books ever written. To describe the plot without spoiling is difficult however it contains a fantastically original merging of sci-fi tropes with Hindu and Buddhist mythology, has one of the greatest opening lines in fiction, and of course has one of the best puns. ( )
  Stephen.Whitehead | Apr 16, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 95 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
As opening lines of novels go, Lord of Light's are among the best I've ever read, and based on how many people have quoted them to me in the last few weeks, the best a lot of you have ever read, too. In twenty-five words, they capture the best-loved aspects of the book — the seamless blend of antiquated cadence and insouciant modern vernacular, of modest sincerity and dry humor — and more, they tell us, in part, what the story is about.
adicionada por lorax | editario9, Josh Wimmer (May 9, 2010)
 
Fantasy disguised as science fiction disguised as fantasy: Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light
adicionada por sturlington | editarTor.com, Jo Walton (Nov 9, 2009)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (34 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Zelazny, Rogerautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Goodfellow, PeterArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jensen, BruceArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Johnson, MichaelArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Martin, George R. R.Posfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Roberts, AdamIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stone, StevenArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Walotsky, RonArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
White, TimArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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of friendship, wisdom, soma.
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It is said that fifty-three years after his liberation he returned from the Golden Cloud to take up once again the gauntlet of Heaven, to oppose the Order of Life and the gods who ordained it so.
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Names are not important... To speak is to name names, but to speak is not important. A thing happens once that has never happened before. Seeing it, a man looks upon reality. He cannot tell others what he has seen. Others wish to know, however, so they question him saying, 'What is it like, this thing you have seen?' So he tries to tell them. Perhaps he has seen the very first fire in the world. He tells them, 'It is red, like a poppy, but through it dance other colors. It has no form, like water, flowing everywhere. It is warm, like the sun of summer, only warmer. It exists for a time upon a piece of wood, and then the wood is gone, as though it were eaten, leaving behind that which is black and can be sifted like sand. When the wood is gone, it too is gone.' Therefore, the hearers must think reality is like a poppy, like water, like the sun, like that which eats and excretes. They think it is like to anything that they are told it is like by the man who has known it. But they have not looked upon fire. They cannot really know it. They can only know of it. But fire comes again into the world, many times. More men look upon fire. After a time, fire is as common as grass and clouds and the air they breathe. They see that, while it is like a poppy, it is not a poppy, while it is like water, it is not water, while it is like the sun, it is not the sun, and while it is like that which eats and passes wastes, it is not that which eats and passes wastes, but something different from each of these apart or all of these together. So they look upon this new thing and they make a new word to call it. They call it 'fire.'"If they come upon one who still has not seen it and they speak to him of fire, he does not know what they mean. So they, in turn, fall back upon telling him what fire is like. 'As they do so, they know from their own experience that what they are telling him is not the truth, but only a part of it. They know that this man will never know reality from their words, though all the words in the world are theirs to use. He must look upon the fire, smell of it, warm his hands by it, stare into its heart, or remain forever ignorant. Therefore, 'fire' does not matter, 'earth' and 'air' and 'water' do not matter. 'I' do not matter. No word matters. But man forgets reality and remembers words. The more words he remembers, the cleverer do his fellows esteem him. He looks upon the great transformations of the world, but he does not see them as they were seen when man looked upon reality for the first time. Their names come to his lips and he smiles as he tastes them, thinking he knows them in the naming. The thing that has never happened before is still happening. It is still a miracle. The great burning blossom squats, flowing, upon the limb of the world, excreting the ash of the world, and being none of these things I have named and at the same time all of them, and this is reality — the Nameless.
I have many names, and none of them matter.
It is said that fifty-three years after his liberation he returned from the Golden Cloud, to take up once again the gauntlet of Heaven, to oppose the Order of Life and the gods who ordained it so. His followers had prayed for his return, though their prayers were sin. Prayer should not trouble one who has gone on to Nirvana, no matter what the circumstances of his going. The wearers of the saffron robe prayed, however, that He of the Sword, Manjusri, should come again among them, The Boddhisatva is said to have heard...
His followers called him Mahasamatman and said he was a god. He preferred to drop the Maha- and the -atman, and called himself Sam. He never claimed to be a god. But then, he never claimed not to be a god. Circumstances being what they were, neither admission could be of any benefit. Silence, though, could.
It was in the days of the rains that their prayers went up, not from the fingering of knotted prayer cords or the spinning of prayer wheels, but from the great pray-machine in the monastery of Ratri, goddess of the Night.
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Imagine a distant world where gods walk as men, but wield vast and hidden powers. Here they have made the stage on which they build a subtle pattern of alliance, love, and deadly enmity. Are they truly immortal? Who are these gods who rule the destiny of a teeming world? Their names include Brahma, Kali, Krishna and also he who was called Buddha, the Lord of Light, but who now prefers to be known simply as Sam. The gradual unfolding of the story -- how the colonization of another planet became a re-enactment of Eastern mythology -- is one of the great imaginative feats of modern science fiction.

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