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Transcription: A Novel por Kate Atkinson
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Transcription: A Novel (original 2018; edição 2018)

por Kate Atkinson (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,8401057,097 (3.7)171
In 1940, eighteen-year old Juliet Armstrong is reluctantly recruited into the world of espionage. Sent to an obscure department of MI5 tasked with monitoring the comings and goings of British Fascist sympathizers, she discovers the work to be by turns both tedious and terrifying. But after the war has ended, she presumes the events of those years have been relegated to the past forever. Ten years later, now a radio producer at the BBC, Juliet is unexpectedly confronted by figures from her past. A different war is being fought now, on a different battleground, but Juliet finds herself once more under threat. A bill of reckoning is due, and she finally begins to realize that there is no action without consequence.… (mais)
Membro:librarypowr
Título:Transcription: A Novel
Autores:Kate Atkinson (Autor)
Informação:Little, Brown (2018), 352 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:World War II-Fiction, World War II-England-Fiction, Spies and espionage-Fiction, Women-Historical fiction

Informação Sobre a Obra

Transcription por Kate Atkinson (2018)

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» Ver também 171 menções

Inglês (103)  Piratês (1)  Holandês (1)  Todas as línguas (105)
Mostrando 1-5 de 105 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I really wanted to like this book but was left just feeling confused during my entire reading.

*I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. * ( )
  JaxlynLeigh | Dec 2, 2021 |
A Mysterious Woman

Juliet Armstrong, the protagonist in Kate Atkinson’s witty and well observed novel of MI5 intrigue during WWII, is a woman of mystery. Throughout the novel she continuously expresses her doubts about those she works with, while, amusingly, awaiting a love affair. It the world of spies, it seems nearly everybody harbors secrets, a warning to readers to put no one above suspicion. The novel, while maybe not up to the standards of Atkinson’s superb Life After Life and A God in Ruins, both set before, during, and after the same period as Transcription, still holds your attention with sharp dialogue and a chapter of history that might be new to some.

Juliet, who recently lost her mother, has been casting about for a job, with the thought of joining the women’s armed services as a way to care for herself. The year is 1940, before the fall of Dunkirk and the London Bliz. Instead of the women’s armed forces, Juliet finds herself shunted over to MI5 and interviewed by a high level official. Juliet exercises one of her skills, the ability to lie straight faced, which her prospective employer considers a decidedly good trait, given the nature of the work. She finds herself in a small apartment, a member of a team charged with transcribing the conservations of British fifth columnists who can’t wait for Hitler to march down Piccadilly. They believe they are reporting to a Gestapo officer and that on the grand day they will benefit from the German takeover. Juliet transcribes their conversations, which prove mostly mundane, sometimes incompetently accumulated information about British military installations, interspersed with visceral hatred of Jews.

As a side note, and as Atkinson explains, a small group of Brits admired Hitler, his regime, particularly his ultra nationalism and virulent racial policies and hatreds. Among the largest were the British Union of Fascists led by Oswald Mosley, he a member of the upper crust, with a military and political history that preceded his fascist endeavors. Even after the war, Mosley continued in politics, notably by organizing the Union Movement that failed and then later, in 1959, running for an MP post based on a call for deporting immigrants (doesn’t that have a familiar ring to it?); this also failed.

But back to the novel. Juliet gets to know these subversives by their voices, then slowly finds herself drawn into actual field work. She befriends a wealthy turncoat and meets others in the movement. Intrigue, followed by chasing about and murder, follow, and for all intents and purposes Juliet finds herself a real spy.

The novel focuses on two periods, 1940 and 1950. By 1950, Juliet has established a career in the BBC, in what was known as the Schools division, which continues today. This proves rather amusing, and with age, she has become quite cutting and not a little cold. Of course, while she hoped she’d put the past behind her, it returns to upend her life, and in the process reveal some of the mystery woman’s secrets.

All in all, well done, and pluses for reminding us of how many might find fascism not only acceptable but preferable to often rowdy and chaotic democracy. Atkinson’s timing is impeccable.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
A Mysterious Woman

Juliet Armstrong, the protagonist in Kate Atkinson’s witty and well observed novel of MI5 intrigue during WWII, is a woman of mystery. Throughout the novel she continuously expresses her doubts about those she works with, while, amusingly, awaiting a love affair. It the world of spies, it seems nearly everybody harbors secrets, a warning to readers to put no one above suspicion. The novel, while maybe not up to the standards of Atkinson’s superb Life After Life and A God in Ruins, both set before, during, and after the same period as Transcription, still holds your attention with sharp dialogue and a chapter of history that might be new to some.

Juliet, who recently lost her mother, has been casting about for a job, with the thought of joining the women’s armed services as a way to care for herself. The year is 1940, before the fall of Dunkirk and the London Bliz. Instead of the women’s armed forces, Juliet finds herself shunted over to MI5 and interviewed by a high level official. Juliet exercises one of her skills, the ability to lie straight faced, which her prospective employer considers a decidedly good trait, given the nature of the work. She finds herself in a small apartment, a member of a team charged with transcribing the conservations of British fifth columnists who can’t wait for Hitler to march down Piccadilly. They believe they are reporting to a Gestapo officer and that on the grand day they will benefit from the German takeover. Juliet transcribes their conversations, which prove mostly mundane, sometimes incompetently accumulated information about British military installations, interspersed with visceral hatred of Jews.

As a side note, and as Atkinson explains, a small group of Brits admired Hitler, his regime, particularly his ultra nationalism and virulent racial policies and hatreds. Among the largest were the British Union of Fascists led by Oswald Mosley, he a member of the upper crust, with a military and political history that preceded his fascist endeavors. Even after the war, Mosley continued in politics, notably by organizing the Union Movement that failed and then later, in 1959, running for an MP post based on a call for deporting immigrants (doesn’t that have a familiar ring to it?); this also failed.

But back to the novel. Juliet gets to know these subversives by their voices, then slowly finds herself drawn into actual field work. She befriends a wealthy turncoat and meets others in the movement. Intrigue, followed by chasing about and murder, follow, and for all intents and purposes Juliet finds herself a real spy.

The novel focuses on two periods, 1940 and 1950. By 1950, Juliet has established a career in the BBC, in what was known as the Schools division, which continues today. This proves rather amusing, and with age, she has become quite cutting and not a little cold. Of course, while she hoped she’d put the past behind her, it returns to upend her life, and in the process reveal some of the mystery woman’s secrets.

All in all, well done, and pluses for reminding us of how many might find fascism not only acceptable but preferable to often rowdy and chaotic democracy. Atkinson’s timing is impeccable.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
I am posting here to say thank you to goodreads for the freebie. However I could not read it. The conversational tone of the book turned me off and Julie really got on my nerves. This book is slow and painful-so sorry goodreads and Little Brown(publisher-you dropped the ball on this one!)
  JBroda | Sep 24, 2021 |
I found this novel confusing and I was never completely sure what was going on. Maybe it was just me. There were parts that were very good but overall I was disappointed in this novel. ( )
  Smits | Aug 29, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 105 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This idea of consequences, and of every choice exacting a price later, runs like a watermark through Transcription, as it did through its two predecessors. At times, the novel is guilty of making its historical parallels a little too emphatic:... Transcription stands alongside its immediate predecessors as a fine example of Atkinson’s mature work; an unapologetic novel of ideas, which is also wise, funny and paced like a spy thriller. While it may lack the emotional sucker punch of A God in Ruins, Transcription exerts a gentler pull on the emotions, offering at the end a glimmer of hope, even as it asks us to consider again our recent history and the price of our individual and collective choices. It could hardly be more timely.
adicionada por KayCliff | editarGuardian, Stephanie Merritt (Sep 4, 2018)
 

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‘In wartime, truth is so precious that she should always be attended by a bodyguard of lies.’
Winston Churchill
This Temple of the Arts and Muses is dedicated to Almighty God by the first Governors of Broadcasting in the year 1931, Sir John Reith being Director General. It is their prayer that good seed sown may bring forth a good harvest, that all things hostile to peace or purity may be banished from this house, and that the people, inclining their ear to whatsoever things are beautiful and honest and of good report, may tread the path of wisdom and uprightness.
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In 1940, eighteen-year old Juliet Armstrong is reluctantly recruited into the world of espionage. Sent to an obscure department of MI5 tasked with monitoring the comings and goings of British Fascist sympathizers, she discovers the work to be by turns both tedious and terrifying. But after the war has ended, she presumes the events of those years have been relegated to the past forever. Ten years later, now a radio producer at the BBC, Juliet is unexpectedly confronted by figures from her past. A different war is being fought now, on a different battleground, but Juliet finds herself once more under threat. A bill of reckoning is due, and she finally begins to realize that there is no action without consequence.

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