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All That Remains: A Life in Death por Sue…
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All That Remains: A Life in Death (original 2018; edição 2018)

por Sue Black (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2351386,248 (4.36)23
_________ 'Utterly gripping'- The Guardian 'Fascinating'- The Sunday Times 'Moving'- Scotsman 'Engrossing'- Financial Times __________ The incredible memoir from the Sunday Times Bestseller. Professor Sue Black breathes new life into the subject of death. Sue Black confronts death every day. As a Professor of Anatomy and Forensic Anthropology, she focuses on mortal remains in her lab, at burial sites, at scenes of violence, murder and criminal dismemberment, and when investigating mass fatalities due to war, accident or natural disaster. In All That Remainsshe reveals the many faces of death she has come to know, using key cases to explore how forensic science has developed, and examining what her life and work has taught her. Do we expect a book about death to be sad? Macabre? Sue's book is neither. There is tragedy, but there is also humour in stories as gripping as the best crime novel. Part memoir, part science, part meditation on death, her book is compassionate, surprisingly funny, and it will make you think about death in a new light. _________ 'One might expect this book to be a grim read but it absolutely isn't. I found it invigorating!' (Andrew Marr, BBC Radio 4 'Start the Week') 'Black's utterly gripping account of her life and career as a professor of anatomy and forensic anthropology manages to be surprisingly life-affirming. As she herself says, it is "as much about life as about death"' (PD Smith Guardian) 'An engrossing memoir . . . an affecting mix of personal and professional'(Erica Wagner, Financial Times) 'A model of how to write about the effect of human evil without losing either objectivity or sensitivity . . . Heartening and anything but morbid . . . Leaves you thinking about what kind of human qualities you value, what kinds of people you actually want to be with' (Rowan Williams, New Statesman) 'For someone whose job is identifying corpses, Sue Black is a cheerful soul . . . All That Remains feels like every episode of 'Silent Witness', pre-fictionalised. Except, you know, really good' (Helen Rumbelow, The Times)… (mais)
Membro:Colleen5096
Título:All That Remains: A Life in Death
Autores:Sue Black (Autor)
Informação:Doubleday (2018)
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

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All That Remains: A Life in Death por Professor Sue Black (2018)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 13 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I'm very over-emotional around the subject of death, so in recent years I've been pulling up my big girl pants and doing more reading around the subject in the hope that this helps. So far it's had zero effect, but I'm remaining positive, and learning lots of interesting things along the way.

Professor Dame Sue Black is one of the world's leading forensic pathologists (I'm not sure if that's a fact or her publisher's spin - I like to think the former), clearly not a job that the majority of the population could stomach but a fascinating one nonetheless.

While Black just pipped Dr. Richard Shepherd to the publishing post on this type of forensic pathology book for the masses (he wrote the equally fascinating Unnatural Causes), both authors took different approaches to their writing on their rather gruesome careers. Shepherd's book focuses on high-profile cases that he's been involved with and how he went about establishing the cause of death, interspersed with personal reflections on how his job detrimentally affected his own family life and marriage. Black's book is more a miss-mash of genres; partly a science overview on a grizzly subject (yet one that comes to us all), partly a memoir on her career and partly reflections on death itself (which is particularly interesting given the non-emotional approach she must bring to her day-to-day job). If the two books were TV shows, Shepherd's book would be more Channel 4 sensationalist reality TV whereas Black's would be a BBC Two science show (in fact I believe they both have actually done independent TV shows that probably don't fall too far from this).

This book by Black was fantastic. Superbly well written, it was informative yet extremely accessible to those from a non-science background and gripped me from the get-go, covering so many different aspects of death. Black brings us behind the scenes of university anatomy classes, providing some insight into why people choose to donate their bodies to medical science (as well as what actually happens when they do) and what it's like for students doing their first cadaver dissections. Holding our hand she explains the bodily process of death from dying to decomposition, her experience of facing death within her own family, the differing approaches certain countries have on handling of bodies after death, and the ethical decisions that come into forensic pathology. From a science perspective she focuses less on stories about how she established the cause of death (although there is a little of that) and more on the science around the information that can be taken from bones and tissue to try to identify remains. She takes us through her work on the back of a number of atrocities (such as Kosovo and the 2004 Tsunami), but throughout it's with utter respect to the deceased, and on these she talks more about the logistical difficulties of trying to do a forensic pathology job in foreign disaster or atrocity sites, keeping opportunities for sensationalism in check.

Black is clearly a no-nonsense Scot with a great sense of humour, and the writing in this memoir was terrific from start to finish. She perfects the balance between not dumbing down the science yet making it accessible, and lifts the curtain on this unusual yet fascinating career without taking her eye off her code of ethics along the way. There's more than a glimpse of ego along the way, but not enough to be off-putting.

4.5 stars - hugely interesting without in any way being macabre (well, maybe just a little in places). ( )
1 vote AlisonY | Jan 12, 2021 |
Subject of high interest. ( )
  MarianneAudio | Aug 16, 2020 |
This book is more of maudlin memoir of the author's life than anything else. We get to read about her weekend job as a butcher's assistant, about her grandmother, her mother, her father, her uncle and her thoughts on their manner of death. We also get to read about the author's opinions on the morals of anything dealing with corpses and death. About halfway through the book we get to the cases she was asked to investigate and the atrocities she had to document in Kosovo. There was a bit of information on anatomy and forensics in this book, but not much. If you want to read about the author's personal experiences as a forensic anthropologist, then you might like this book. I didn't find the book all that compelling or interesting. ( )
  ElentarriLT | Mar 24, 2020 |
Fascinating autobiography from a UK forensic anthropologist for whom death has become part of life. The introduction is a little dry, but Sue Black's recounting of her personal and professional dealings with the dead, from her grandfather's funeral to working on a Disaster Victim Identification team in Kosovo, ironically bring her narrative to life. I found her stories both insightful and emotive, but she also has a wonderfully dry sense of humour, which I think must be a prerequisite for all those working in such a morbid profession. I do wish there were more illustrations, however - I had to Google some interesting cases she mentions, such as the 'Brienzi' body and the bones of a Roman woman who died giving birth to triplets. ( )
  AdonisGuilfoyle | Jan 19, 2020 |
This book explores death's multiple faces, from personal musings on how it affects self, family and friends, to more technical and scientific information on, for example, identification of remnants or investigating sites of mass fatalities.

Black communicates eloquently, accessibly and thoughtfully on a topic many people might wish to avoid. I started reading the book with more background knowledge than many readers (I'm a pathologist), but I think this book will help demystify death and its associated processes, rituals and beliefs.

Highly recommended.
  MHThaung | Nov 27, 2019 |
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For Tom, for ever my love and my life. And for Beth, Grace and Anna - each is my favourite daughter. Thank you for making every moment of my life worthwhile.
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Death and the hyped-up circus that surrounds her are perhps more laden with cliches than almost any other aspect of human existence.
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_________ 'Utterly gripping'- The Guardian 'Fascinating'- The Sunday Times 'Moving'- Scotsman 'Engrossing'- Financial Times __________ The incredible memoir from the Sunday Times Bestseller. Professor Sue Black breathes new life into the subject of death. Sue Black confronts death every day. As a Professor of Anatomy and Forensic Anthropology, she focuses on mortal remains in her lab, at burial sites, at scenes of violence, murder and criminal dismemberment, and when investigating mass fatalities due to war, accident or natural disaster. In All That Remainsshe reveals the many faces of death she has come to know, using key cases to explore how forensic science has developed, and examining what her life and work has taught her. Do we expect a book about death to be sad? Macabre? Sue's book is neither. There is tragedy, but there is also humour in stories as gripping as the best crime novel. Part memoir, part science, part meditation on death, her book is compassionate, surprisingly funny, and it will make you think about death in a new light. _________ 'One might expect this book to be a grim read but it absolutely isn't. I found it invigorating!' (Andrew Marr, BBC Radio 4 'Start the Week') 'Black's utterly gripping account of her life and career as a professor of anatomy and forensic anthropology manages to be surprisingly life-affirming. As she herself says, it is "as much about life as about death"' (PD Smith Guardian) 'An engrossing memoir . . . an affecting mix of personal and professional'(Erica Wagner, Financial Times) 'A model of how to write about the effect of human evil without losing either objectivity or sensitivity . . . Heartening and anything but morbid . . . Leaves you thinking about what kind of human qualities you value, what kinds of people you actually want to be with' (Rowan Williams, New Statesman) 'For someone whose job is identifying corpses, Sue Black is a cheerful soul . . . All That Remains feels like every episode of 'Silent Witness', pre-fictionalised. Except, you know, really good' (Helen Rumbelow, The Times)

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