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A Very Large Expanse of Sea por Tahereh Mafi
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A Very Large Expanse of Sea (edição 2019)

por Tahereh Mafi (Autor)

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5853431,098 (4.3)3
Longlisted for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature! From the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of the Shatter Me series comes a powerful, heartrending contemporary novel about fear, first love, and the devastating impact of prejudice. This young adult novel is an excellent choice for accelerated tween readers in grades 7 to 8, especially during homeschooling. It's a fun way to keep your child entertained and engaged while not in the classroom. It's 2002, a year after 9/11. It's an extremely turbulent time politically, but especially so for someone like Shirin, a sixteen-year-old Muslim girl who's tired of being stereotyped. Shirin is never surprised by how horrible people can be. She's tired of the rude stares, the degrading comments--even the physical violence--she endures as a result of her race, her religion, and the hijab she wears every day. So she's built up protective walls and refuses to let anyone close enough to hurt her. Instead, she drowns her frustrations in music and spends her afternoons break-dancing with her brother. But then she meets Ocean James. He's the first person in forever who really seems to want to get to know Shirin. It terrifies her--they seem to come from two irreconcilable worlds--and Shirin has had her guard up for so long that she's not sure she'll ever be able to let it down.… (mais)
Membro:Llundqui
Título:A Very Large Expanse of Sea
Autores:Tahereh Mafi (Autor)
Informação:HarperCollins (2019), Edition: Reprint, 336 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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A Very Large Expanse of Sea por Tahereh Mafi

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Mostrando 1-5 de 34 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I loved this story! This is a well-written and excellent story about a white junior male who falls in love with a Persian sophomore female in a racist town post 9/11. Of course, the residents will deny their prejudice and racist behavior, but Mafi clearly exposes them. Shirin's voice and character will probably resonate with many young females of color who wear hijabs and are stereotyped, victimized and bullied. Readers will like Ocean James, the sweet white guy who likes Shirin and tries to combat the prejudice. A must read. ( )
  AdwoaCamaraIfe | Aug 18, 2021 |
diverse teen fiction (10th-grade hijabi Persian meets 11th grade all-american basketball star)

a sweet love story (with some sizzling kissing scenes) complicated by bigoted high school students and teachers post 9/11. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Shirin is a second-generation American of Iranian descent. Her family is Muslim and she chooses to wear a hijab. In 2002, only one year after 9/11, she is disgusted with humanity. She’s had one too many teachers ask if she speaks English, listened to one too many “jokes” about terrorists, had one too many strangers tell her to go back where she came from, and in general just had enough. She’s angry, withdrawn, and sullen. More often than not, she walks with her head down, listening to music under her hijab, and trying to ignore the jerks around her. But then she meets a guy who just won’t be ignored. Ocean makes stupid assumptions about her too but he also asks honest questions, listens to the answers, and genuinely tries to learn from his mistakes.

Wow. I stumbled on this title while I was looking for ideas for #ownvoices books for the Diversity Challenge prompt this month. I wasn’t too much older than Shirin when 9/11 happened and I remember all the anti-Muslim attacks and rhetoric at the time. I’m not a huge fan of contemporary/realistic young adult books but this one piqued my interest. I wanted to see a historic time that I lived as a white Christian through the eyes of someone who was (and unfortunately still is) on the receiving end of so much unwarranted hate, anger, and violence.

Shirin is so relatable, despite our obvious differences. Who wouldn’t be angry and withdrawn after all she’s experienced, especially when she was born in the US and speaks better English and gets better grades than most of the people who give her a hard time?

“I’m tired as hell, Mr. Jordan. I’ve been trying to educate people for years and it’s exhausting. I’m tired of being patient with bigots. I’m tired of trying to explain why I don’t deserve to be treated like a piece of shit all the time. I’m tired of begging everyone to understand that people of color aren’t all the same, that we don’t all believe the same things or feel the same things or experience the world the same way.” I shook my head, hard. “I’m just—I’m sick and tired of trying to explain to the world why racism is bad, okay? Why is that my job?”

But she doesn’t realize how much that anger is affecting her. She doesn’t realize that by withdrawing and refusing to form or seek any friendships, she’s letting racists dictate her actions. Her outgoing, handsome brother and his friends finally point out how scary and intimidating she is and Shirin is truly taken aback. She’s aiming for unapproachable and unconcerned, not frightening.

“Just try to be happy,” Jacobi finally said to me. “Your happiness is the one thing these assholes can’t stand.”

As Shirin settles into her new school and starts to slowly open up to a handful of friends, others start to pay more attention to her. And life gets so much harder for her. I was furious, especially when parents and teachers started showing their hateful underbellies. Shirin is fictional but countless real people share her experiences. I just don’t understand what drives some cowards to be so cruel to those they view as The Other.

Ocean was a blueprint of what vulnerable people might need from an ally. Be there in the good and the bad times. Stand beside those who come under attack and defend them when they can’t defend themselves. Understand when they’re having a bad day and might not be the best company. Speak up for them when the opportunity arises. He did all these things and more. He came across as a little too perfect for my taste but he has a good heart and I was proud of him. He’s unbelievably open about his feelings and helps Shirin come out of her hardened shell.

I tore through this book because I so desperately wanted to know what was going to happen. I was seriously worried about these two. The ending was a bit of a letdown and the only reason I’m rating this 4.5 stars instead of 5.

I highly recommend this if you want to read about characters who feel so real, you expect them to step off the page. For me, and probably for others with a background similar to mine, it was heartbreaking, infuriating, and eye-opening to read about Shirin’s experiences. ( )
  JG_IntrovertedReader | Apr 20, 2021 |
My entry for 2021 PopSugar Reading Challenge prompt: a book by a Muslim American author

More than five years ago, I did not finish Tahereh Mafi's Shatter Me. It was too slow-paced for me, so I thought this book is the same thing. Woah! I am actually surprised by how good this book is.
This is probably my first book about Muslim immigrants in the USA (when 9/11 happened). It reminds me of the famous movie line "My Name is Khan and I'm not a terrorist" (love that movie, btw).
The main character is one of the most assertive people in literature that I know of. Actually, most characters here are tough (because they have to be), interesting and talented (I see you, Shirin's father).
I thought this is another romantic cliché I can live without. Well, they're adorable and wholesome and their chemistry is similar to Eleanor and Park. Will definitely read a sequel, if there's any.

content warning: profanity ( )
  DzejnCrvena | Apr 2, 2021 |
“I understood too well what it was like to feel like you were defined by one superficial thing- to feel like you would never escape the box people had put you in”

Reading contemporary romantic books was a part of my coming-of-age years. Never in those time that I found a book circling the life of a young girl with the same religion as me. I didn't complain because I thought what is there to complain? Most of the writings of the books are all good, and I read more diverse genre ever since. Years later, Tahereh Mafi published a contemporary novel about a young Muslim girl, and I still couldn't be more excited to get the book on my hand.

The story is about Shirin, a Muslim girl who wears a hijab, struggling at high school after the event of 9/11. We all knew how much of a horror that time was and how much it affected the image of Muslims all around the world. This book, inspired by Mafi's experience, shows how it influenced Shirin's life as an American high schooler, with romance story and breakdancing.

I did expect the romance part of this novel because that's written on the synopsis. However, this type of romance is not my cup of tea. Yes, there are heartwarming moments here and there, but sometimes I feel it's a little bit too much. I did enjoy Mafi's direct writing in this one, though. I love the theme brought in this book also because it subverts our expectations towards a contemporary romance book. The idea resonates with a lot of people with any background. It's a breath of fresh air in the pile of contemporary (or YA?) books around the market. I recommend this to everyone, not only from Muslim background, who loves a light-read contemporary book to read in holidays. ( )
  bellacrl | Jan 19, 2021 |
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Longlisted for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature! From the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of the Shatter Me series comes a powerful, heartrending contemporary novel about fear, first love, and the devastating impact of prejudice. This young adult novel is an excellent choice for accelerated tween readers in grades 7 to 8, especially during homeschooling. It's a fun way to keep your child entertained and engaged while not in the classroom. It's 2002, a year after 9/11. It's an extremely turbulent time politically, but especially so for someone like Shirin, a sixteen-year-old Muslim girl who's tired of being stereotyped. Shirin is never surprised by how horrible people can be. She's tired of the rude stares, the degrading comments--even the physical violence--she endures as a result of her race, her religion, and the hijab she wears every day. So she's built up protective walls and refuses to let anyone close enough to hurt her. Instead, she drowns her frustrations in music and spends her afternoons break-dancing with her brother. But then she meets Ocean James. He's the first person in forever who really seems to want to get to know Shirin. It terrifies her--they seem to come from two irreconcilable worlds--and Shirin has had her guard up for so long that she's not sure she'll ever be able to let it down.

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