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Fracture: A Novel por Andrés Neuman
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Fracture: A Novel (edição 2020)

por Andrés Neuman (Autor), Nick Caistor (Tradutor), Lorenza Garcia (Tradutor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
564363,065 (2.67)3
Uno de los mejores libros del 2018 según Babelia. El regreso de Andrés Neuman a la gran novela tras El viajero del siglo, Premio Alfaguara y Premio de la Crítica. Una historia sobre la belleza que emerge de las cosas rotas. «Me mostró sus cicatrices. Un fino entramado en los antebrazos y la espalda. Parecía transportar un árbol. Luego él vio las mías. Nos sentimos livianos, un poco feos y muy bellos. Dos supervivientes.» El señor Watanabe, superviviente de la bomba atómica, se siente un fugitivo de su propia memoria y está a punto de tomar una de las decisiones más cruciales de su vida. El terremoto previo al accidente de Fukushima provoca un movimiento de placas que remueve el pasado colectivo. Cuatro mujeres narran sus vidas y sus recuerdos de Watanabe a un enigmático periodista argentino, en un recorrido sentimental y político por ciudades como Tokio, París, Nueva York, Buenos Aires o Madrid. Este cruce de idiomas, países y parejas va revelando cómo nada ocurre en un solo lugar, cómo cada acontecimiento se expande hasta hacer temblar las antípodas. El modo en que las sociedades recuerdan y, sobre todo, olvidan. En Fractura se entretejen amor y humor, historia y energía, la belleza que emerge de las cosas rotas. Con esta novela Andrés Neuman regresa con fuerza a la narrativa de largo aliento, que lo consagró internacionalmente con El viajero del siglo, y firma su obra mayor. ENGLISH DESCRIPTION This is Andres Neuman's big novelistic return after winning the Premio Alfaguara and Premio de la Critica for El viajero del siglo / Traveler of the Century. In it, he tells the story of all the beauty that comes from broken things. "He showed me his scars. A fine lattice on his forearms and back. Then he saw mine. We felt weightless, a bit ugly, and very beautiful. Two survivors." Mr. Watanabe, an atomic bomb survivor, feels like a fugitive of his own memory; he is about to make one of the most crucial decisions of his life. The earthquake prior to the Fukushima accident caused the movement of plates that stirred up a collective past. Four women narrate their lives and memories of Mr. Watanabe to a mysterious Argentine journalist throughout a sentimental and political journey through Tokyo, Paris, New York, Buenos Aires, and Madrid. This crossroad of languages, countries and couples reveals the way in which societies remember and, above all, how they forget.… (mais)
Membro:poingu
Título:Fracture: A Novel
Autores:Andrés Neuman (Autor)
Outros autores:Nick Caistor (Tradutor), Lorenza Garcia (Tradutor)
Informação:Farrar, Straus and Giroux (2020), 368 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Fracture por Andrés Neuman

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» Ver também 3 menções

Mostrando 5 de 5
Well written; well translated; full of interesting ideas; no coherent whole; disappointing; verrrrrrrry long; no likeable characters; meandered all over the place; good, interesting structure; promised more than it delivered; missed opportunity. ( )
  pgmcc | Sep 18, 2020 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Gorgeous prose but I was a little distracted by the artifice of the language. Which is contradictory,I know, but what I mean to say is that at times the beauty of the words overshadowed their meaning. An overpolished feeling kept me at arm's length, especially in the sections where first-person narrators recount past experiences with the central character. These first-person observations seemed excessively formal sometimes, and a little shallow at other times.

So I'm coming out of this read both disappointed and intrigued. I feel the need to keep looking for a fictional transformation of the Fukushima disaster that goes deeper. And I want to keep reading this author. What I liked: The reflection on the two nuclear disasters that have shaped Japanese self-identity, and how these events might affect a sensitive man who had live through both. ( )
  poingu | Jul 17, 2020 |
The author seems to know everything about everything. I was unconvinced by this Argentinian male’s vast store of knowledge about the Japanese, women, nuclear energy, Paris, New York, World War II, and on and on. I found it all really tedious and made it only to the 35% point. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher. ( )
  fhudnell | Jun 18, 2020 |
‘’An earthquake fractures the present, shutters perspective, shifts memory plates.’’

Joshi Watanabe returns to a tumultuous past, in the aftermath of the devastating Fukushima earthquake in 2011. His recollections are centred around his relationships with women around the world and Japan’s position since the 40s. An ambitious premise, but the writer falls short. Extremely short, in my opinion.

Watanabe’s lovers are given what seems to be a powerful, determined and confident voice. But their desperate focus on sex diminished them in my eyes, and every character (Watanabe included) was so cold, so distant, so impossibly empty… The story takes us on a journey to Tokyo, Paris, New York, Buenos Aires and Madrid and touches, primarily, on the status of Japan following the war, the difficult questions raised by Japan’s actions during WWII but there is no mention of Japan’s unimaginable atrocities against China. Naturally, there is extensive reference to the events in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, all the way to the era of the Cold War, Chernobyl and out times.

Now there was a significant problem I faced which ruined the book irreversibly. Watanabe’s remarks were nationalistic and misogynistic. Was the writer’s intention to make him appear thus? Did his musings reflect the writer’s own opinions? Regardless of the answer, it became a chore to read once repetition and dubious political remarks got in the way. The anti-nuclear message is evident, and rightly so, but there is a thin line between so-called activism and ignorance of the historical facts. The need to justify the actions of the Japanese army during WWII while turning the blind eye to the massacre in China was infuriating. It was ridiculous. It was horrible. The remark that Germany ‘’is the bravest nation’’ because they ‘’had the guts to admit’’ the atrocities was the phrase that made me want to throw my e-reader away. Really? Does the Argentinian writer believe that a mea culpa absolves you? The torture my grandfather went through in Dachau isn’t erased by a billion ‘’I’m sorry’’. The burnt villages, the executed families, the millions of Jews, the millions of victims of the Nazis tyranny, the soldiers of the Allies that lived Hell on Earth in the battlefields of the Pacific aren’t forgotten because a politician whispers an insincere ‘’I’m sorry’’. I suggest Churchill’s biography to the writer in order to understand what it means to be a fighter to free the world from darkness. If the writer wishes to feel pity for the Nazis, the Japanese, the Turks and every army that caused terror during the WWII, there are many ‘’squads’’ he can join. I am disgusted. This is my opinion and whether others disagree with me or not doesn’t interest me in the slightest. Each one of us answers to his own private code of morality. I answer to the wound of my family’s torment during WWII.

In addition, the focus on sex was cheap, voyeuristic, degrading. One more reason for me to throw this away.

Yes, the prose may have been beautiful at times, and the spirit of each city was depicted in a direct, moving way. But, in my opinion, political and social themes were used in a lengthy lecture with the reader as the target audience. And I don’t like being lectured by writers who most obviously retain a frightening kind of political agendas. Perhaps, we should leave the tremendously talented Japanese writers to write about Japan.

ARC from Farrar, Straus and Giroux and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Jun 9, 2020 |
'An earthquake shatters the present, shatters perspective, shifts memory plates.'

The 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami sets our main character, Yoshie Watanabe, off on a journey to confront both his past and to find answers. A survivor of the Hiroshima bomb, and by pure chance having avoided being in Nagasaki three days later, Watanabe embodies some sort of Everyman figure, a living testament to mankind's uncanny ability to completely f**k everything up. During the course of his life he lives in several different cities - Paris, New York, Buenos Aires and Madrid - and in each he has relationship with a different woman. A subplot of the book is an Argentinian journalist, working on a series of articles on nuclear disasters, constantly ringing Watanabe to try and interview him. Interweaved throughout are the voices of the 4 female characters, describing their memories of their relationships with Watanabe.

As the book progresses, Watanabe hires a car and drives into the exclusion zone surrounding the Fukushima nuclear reactor, triggered by his childhood experiences.

Whilst I enjoyed the book, I felt that the ambition outweighed the actual reality. Watanabe remained a totally flat character, and the four chapters from the female characters actually said more about them than anything else, adding little to the flesh of the book. And while the idea of Watanabe being a character on to which we can hook, as witness, some of the striking events of man's impulse to destroy (other nuclear meltdowns, 9/11, the Madrid bombings, the South American 'disappeared', etc) the book seemed to simply descend into a fairly one-sided rant against nuclear energy.

Interesting, but flawed in its execution, and unfortunately Mr Watanabe left me cold. ( )
  Alan.M | Apr 20, 2020 |
Mostrando 5 de 5
Fracture is by far the Argentinian writer Andrés Neuman’s most successful experiment. Neuman is a poet, short story writer, columnist and firm favourite of the late Chilean novelist Roberto Bolaño, who proclaimed: “The literature of the 21st century will belong to Neuman.” [...] The book tells the story of Yoshie Watanabe, a Japanese businessman who survived the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and who, after the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011, undertakes a journey to the devastated area of Fukushima in order to understand his – and his nation’s – history of survival and trauma.
adicionada por shervinafshar | editarThe Guardian, Ian Sansom (Jul 3, 2020)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (6 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Andrés Neumanautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Caistor, NickTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Garcia, LorenzaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Niola, FedericaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Park, JuneDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Uno de los mejores libros del 2018 según Babelia. El regreso de Andrés Neuman a la gran novela tras El viajero del siglo, Premio Alfaguara y Premio de la Crítica. Una historia sobre la belleza que emerge de las cosas rotas. «Me mostró sus cicatrices. Un fino entramado en los antebrazos y la espalda. Parecía transportar un árbol. Luego él vio las mías. Nos sentimos livianos, un poco feos y muy bellos. Dos supervivientes.» El señor Watanabe, superviviente de la bomba atómica, se siente un fugitivo de su propia memoria y está a punto de tomar una de las decisiones más cruciales de su vida. El terremoto previo al accidente de Fukushima provoca un movimiento de placas que remueve el pasado colectivo. Cuatro mujeres narran sus vidas y sus recuerdos de Watanabe a un enigmático periodista argentino, en un recorrido sentimental y político por ciudades como Tokio, París, Nueva York, Buenos Aires o Madrid. Este cruce de idiomas, países y parejas va revelando cómo nada ocurre en un solo lugar, cómo cada acontecimiento se expande hasta hacer temblar las antípodas. El modo en que las sociedades recuerdan y, sobre todo, olvidan. En Fractura se entretejen amor y humor, historia y energía, la belleza que emerge de las cosas rotas. Con esta novela Andrés Neuman regresa con fuerza a la narrativa de largo aliento, que lo consagró internacionalmente con El viajero del siglo, y firma su obra mayor. ENGLISH DESCRIPTION This is Andres Neuman's big novelistic return after winning the Premio Alfaguara and Premio de la Critica for El viajero del siglo / Traveler of the Century. In it, he tells the story of all the beauty that comes from broken things. "He showed me his scars. A fine lattice on his forearms and back. Then he saw mine. We felt weightless, a bit ugly, and very beautiful. Two survivors." Mr. Watanabe, an atomic bomb survivor, feels like a fugitive of his own memory; he is about to make one of the most crucial decisions of his life. The earthquake prior to the Fukushima accident caused the movement of plates that stirred up a collective past. Four women narrate their lives and memories of Mr. Watanabe to a mysterious Argentine journalist throughout a sentimental and political journey through Tokyo, Paris, New York, Buenos Aires, and Madrid. This crossroad of languages, countries and couples reveals the way in which societies remember and, above all, how they forget.

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