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The Silence of the Girls: From the Booker…
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The Silence of the Girls: From the Booker prize-winning author of… (original 2018; edição 2019)

por Pat Barker (Autor)

Séries: The Women of Troy (1)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
1,4168310,022 (3.96)1 / 256
"From the Booker Prize-winning author of the Regeneration trilogy comes a monumental new masterpiece, set in the midst of literature's most famous war. Pat Barker turns her attention to the timeless legend of The Iliad, as experienced by the captured women living in the Greek camp in the final weeks of the Trojan War. The ancient city of Troy has withstood a decade under siege of the powerful Greek army, who continue to wage bloody war over a stolen woman--Helen. In the Greek camp, another woman watches and waits for the war's outcome: Briseis. She was queen of one of Troy's neighboring kingdoms, until Achilles, Greece's greatest warrior, sacked her city and murdered her husband and brothers. Briseis becomes Achilles's concubine, a prize of battle, and must adjust quickly in order to survive a radically different life, as one of the many conquered women who serve the Greek army. When Agamemnon, the brutal political leader of the Greek forces, demands Briseis for himself, she finds herself caught between the two most powerful of the Greeks. Achilles refuses to fight in protest, and the Greeks begin to lose ground to their Trojan opponents. Keenly observant and cooly unflinching about the daily horrors of war, Briseis finds herself in an unprecedented position to observe the two men driving the Greek forces in what will become their final confrontation, deciding the fate, not only of Briseis's people, but also of the ancient world at large. Briseis is just one among thousands of women living behind the scenes in this war--the slaves and prostitutes, the nurses, the women who lay out the dead--all of them erased by history. With breathtaking historical detail and luminous prose, Pat Barker brings the teeming world of the Greek camp to vivid life. She offers nuanced, complex portraits of characters and stories familiar from mythology, which, seen from Briseis's perspective, are rife with newfound revelations. Barker's latest builds on her decades-long study of war and its impact on individual lives--and it is nothing short of magnificent"--"The Iliad, as experienced by the captured women living in the Greek camp in the final weeks of the Trojan War"--… (mais)
Membro:Metatherion
Título:The Silence of the Girls: From the Booker prize-winning author of Regeneration
Autores:Pat Barker (Autor)
Informação:Penguin (2019), Edition: 01, 336 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The Silence of the Girls por Pat Barker (2018)

  1. 11
    Circe por Madeline Miller (avk88)
    avk88: Greek mythology retelling from female perspective
  2. 00
    Ransom por David Malouf (GCPLreader)
  3. 00
    Hand of Fire por Judith Starkston (Utilizador anónimo)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 82 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Briseis knows what will happen to her if she is still alive when Achilles and the Greek army reach her palace. She can hear him coming. Her husband, father and her brothers are already dead, and she has the option to throw herself from the ramparts, but she chooses to wait and become a captive. She is assigned to Achilles as part of his prize for what he has achieved in battle.

Her life radically changes as she becomes concubine and house servant.

The story explores what happens to women as they become trophies of war, at the same as combining Briseis' story with the legends of Achilles as we know them from Homer's Iliad. ( )
  smik | Sep 26, 2021 |
Ok, first off, I enjoyed Circe so much that I put myself on the list at my library to get this book when it came in-I amazingly was #2-Thus I literally read them back to back. There lies the dilemma-I went into this expecting it to be along the same lines-Bad thinking on my part. If you read Circe and are going to read this, put Circe out of your mind.

This is the story of the 9th and 10th years of the Trojan War. The POV is from Queen Briseis, She was taken as Achilles "Prize" when her town Lyrnessus was sacked and destroyed by the Greeks. Taken to a camp on the outskirts of Troy she becomes the slave and bed mate of the man who killed her entire family.

The first 100 pages were very rough reading. as you are seeing through the eyes of an abused woman. The visual you are forced to see is extremely hard on the mind. After that point some of the POV comes from Patroclus and Achilles, and you see the brutality of war. You also see the mind-set of these men-They sit and talk about Briseis "being his (Achilles) prize", calling her "it" as she is forced to be in the room and listen. You feel her pain, you watch as her soul is ripped to shred. When Briseis is handed over to Agamemnon an inkling of Achilles having a heart starts to come through, for a minute, he misses her-but then he comes to his senses "No, she was just a prize, no more, no less. The pain I feel is merely humiliation." He feels his "prize" was stolen from him by a man who is inferior to him in every way. And so, like a child , he has a tantrum-"Well, that's that. Let him try to take Troy without me!"

There is a good chunk of the story that deals with the lives of the women in the camp, other " prizes", who try to live with their circumstances the best way possible. Briseis cannot understand how these women accept their fate, bear children for these captors and love those children. "Stockholm Syndrome"? Maybe, more likely these women realize their past is gone, and in order to move on, with any semblance of sanity, they deal with it, plain and simple.

I had some problems with some of the writing. I am not a scholar, by any means, on mythology or Greek history-Would Patroclus really say "Bugger Off" or Achilles "Good show, chaps"?-Maybe it's just me, but how did we get from ancient Greece, to mid-town London?

No doubt-Pat Barker is a gifted writer, however she can ramble on-paragraph after paragraph about the rats in the Greek camp-after 2 paragraphs it was obvious that these pests were going to bring sickness to the camp.

However, in most parts of the book the writing is flawless. Some will think it is too raw-but there was no other way to tell this story-had Barker sugared coated it, it would have been historical-fluff.

The rating I gave this book shows what a good writer can do to turn a reader around to their POV. The first section had me at a low 3, by the time I got to the end she had won me over ( )
  JBroda | Sep 24, 2021 |
A beautifully lyrical and disturbing book, with a very strong start. The fall of Lyrnessus was quite a powerful beginning, though unfortunately a height I didn't feel the story ever reached again.

It also seems very strange to me that so much of the back half of the book is not only about Achilles, but basically from his perspective. It's as if Pat Barker had begun her book meaning to concentrate on the experience of the women of Lyrnessus and Troy, but along the way suddenly thought "hey, these Achilles and Patroclus guys are pretty interesting, aren't they?" Which, to be fair, they certainly are-- it's just I assumed the premise of this book was that the men of the Trojan War had gotten enough play. It was especially jarring when Kristen Atherton's narration was suddenly broken in on by Michael Fox-- driving home that for those chapters the girls will continue to, literally, be silent.

That being said, Pat Barker can turn quite a phrase, and has created an interesting book full of excellent metaphor and thought-provoking observation. It just ran a little long, and I wish it had been more about the women themselves. ( )
  misslevel | Sep 22, 2021 |
TW: graphic violence, gore, sexual assault, rape, slavery, child death, animal death, human sacrifice, mentions of suicide.. I’m sure I’m missing more.

I’m not even sure how to describe my feelings about this one. It’s a wonderfully narrated story of the fall of Troy through the perspective of Briseis (and also Achilles in parts) and it feels like a completely different story when told through the voice of a woman who has lost everything to the war and is now a slave who doesn’t know what will happen to her in the future. It’s harsh, bleak and violent, but it is also a tale of survival and resilience of the many women who have lost their agency and freedom and all loved ones, but still brave an existence among their enemies and now masters. The audiobook narration also makes us feel the characters’ emotions very deeply, and I think it definitely enhanced my experience of the book. I just received the arc of thee sequel of this book, and I can’t wait to read it soon. ( )
  ksahitya1987 | Aug 20, 2021 |
I really, really wanted to love this book, but I couldn't help but think about [b:The Song of Achilles|11250317|The Song of Achilles|Madeline Miller|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1331154660l/11250317._SX50_.jpg|16176791] while reading, particularly in the next-to-last paragraph ("One thing I do know: they won't want the brutal reality of conquest and slavery... No, they'll go for something softer altogether. A love story perhaps?") . Although I agree with most other reviews here (is a feminist retelling but is still almost entirely about men, etc), the tone of that paragraph seemed really petulant and left a sour taste in my mouth after reading, even though I had enjoyed most of the book. If I hadn't read and loved Song of Achilles beforehand, I think I would have had a much better impression of Silence of the Girls after reading, which is tragic.

Also haaaated Barker's use of British slang - Achilles saying "Cheers, lads, she'll do" made me cringe. ( )
  madelinemar | Aug 16, 2021 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Barker, Patautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Arribas, Carlos JiménezTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Atherton, KristinNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bosch, EefjeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bury, LaurentTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
翁海贞Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fox, MichaelNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ganho, TâniaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Κανελλοπού… ΔέσποιναTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jiménez Arribas, CarlosTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Johansson, EvaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Karsch, LauraTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Novotná, KateřinaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Odeh, AlaaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Palmieri, CarlaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
فرزام حبیبی‌ا, صفهانیTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Прокуров, Р.Н.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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“You know how European literature begins?” he’d ask, after taking the roll at the first class meeting. “With a quarrel. All of European literature springs from a fight.” And then he picked up his copy of The Iliad and read to the class the opening lines. “ ‘Divine Muse, sing of the ruinous wrath of Achilles…Begin where they first quarrelled, Agamemnon, the King of men, and great Achilles.’ And what are they quarrelling about, these two violent, mighty souls? It’s as basic as a barroom brawl. They are quarrelling over a woman. A girl, really. A girl stolen from her father. A girl abducted in a war.”

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Great Achilles. Brilliant Achilles, shining Achilles, godlike Achilles…How the epithets pile up. We never called him any of those things; we called him “the butcher.”
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It was astonishing the way really quite intelligent women seemed to believe that if they carried their eyeliner beyond the outer corner of the lid and gave it a little upward flick, they'd have Helen's eyes. Or if they fastened their cinctures the same way she did hers, they'd have Helen's breasts. All this mindless imitation of a woman they affected to despise...No wonder she laughed at them.
Poor Mynes. His idea of female beauty was a woman so fat if you slapped her backside in the morning she'd still be jiggling when you got back home for dinner.
Yes, the death of young men in battle is a tragedy - I’d lost four brothers, I didn’t need anybody to tell me that. A tragedy worthy of any number of laments - but theirs is not the worst fate. I looked at Andromache, who’d have to live the rest of her amputated life as a slave, and I thought: We need a new song.
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The defeated go down in history and disappear, and their stories die with them
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"From the Booker Prize-winning author of the Regeneration trilogy comes a monumental new masterpiece, set in the midst of literature's most famous war. Pat Barker turns her attention to the timeless legend of The Iliad, as experienced by the captured women living in the Greek camp in the final weeks of the Trojan War. The ancient city of Troy has withstood a decade under siege of the powerful Greek army, who continue to wage bloody war over a stolen woman--Helen. In the Greek camp, another woman watches and waits for the war's outcome: Briseis. She was queen of one of Troy's neighboring kingdoms, until Achilles, Greece's greatest warrior, sacked her city and murdered her husband and brothers. Briseis becomes Achilles's concubine, a prize of battle, and must adjust quickly in order to survive a radically different life, as one of the many conquered women who serve the Greek army. When Agamemnon, the brutal political leader of the Greek forces, demands Briseis for himself, she finds herself caught between the two most powerful of the Greeks. Achilles refuses to fight in protest, and the Greeks begin to lose ground to their Trojan opponents. Keenly observant and cooly unflinching about the daily horrors of war, Briseis finds herself in an unprecedented position to observe the two men driving the Greek forces in what will become their final confrontation, deciding the fate, not only of Briseis's people, but also of the ancient world at large. Briseis is just one among thousands of women living behind the scenes in this war--the slaves and prostitutes, the nurses, the women who lay out the dead--all of them erased by history. With breathtaking historical detail and luminous prose, Pat Barker brings the teeming world of the Greek camp to vivid life. She offers nuanced, complex portraits of characters and stories familiar from mythology, which, seen from Briseis's perspective, are rife with newfound revelations. Barker's latest builds on her decades-long study of war and its impact on individual lives--and it is nothing short of magnificent"--"The Iliad, as experienced by the captured women living in the Greek camp in the final weeks of the Trojan War"--

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