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Proust's Way: A Field Guide to in…
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Proust's Way: A Field Guide to in Search of Lost Time (original 2001; edição 2001)

por Roger Shattuck (Autor)

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276471,648 (4.04)14
An illuminating work that serves as both an introduction to Proust--perhaps Europe's most enduring twentieth-century novelist--and a searching reinterpretation of his work. Since beginning his career, Roger Shattuck has been mesmerized by one writer. First came Proust's Binoculars, a short, brilliant study published in 1964. Then came Marcel Proust, commissioned by Frank Kermode for the Modern Masters series, which won the National Book Award in 1974. A series of essays, lectures, and reviews followed. Now, like Richard Ellmann, whose constant outpourings on Joyce resulted in his triumphant biography James Joyce, Roger Shattuck written a new and definitive work. Devoting special care to Proust's masterpiece In Search of Lost Time (traditionally translated as Remembrance of Things Past), Shattuck laments his subject's defenselessness against zealous editors, praises some translations, examines Proust's place in the path of aesthetic decadence blazed by Baudelaire and Wilde, and presents Proust as a novelist whose philosophical gifts were matched by his irrepressible comic sense. Proust's Way, the culmination of a lifetime of scholarship, will serve as the next generation's guide to Proust.… (mais)
Membro:ajtindall
Título:Proust's Way: A Field Guide to in Search of Lost Time
Autores:Roger Shattuck (Autor)
Informação:W. W. Norton & Company (2001), Edition: Illustrated, 317 pages
Colecções:Fiction & Philosophy Shelf, A sua biblioteca
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Proust's Way: A Field Guide to In Search of Lost Time por Roger Shattuck (2001)

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A close friend just started Proust for the first time, which excited me so much that I wanted to reading group it with him. But I don't have time, so I read this instead. Not as good as Proust! Surprise, surprise.

It suffers a bit from being two books, one for people who haven't read the Search yet, and one for people who have. The one for newcomers is a better book, being an actual book. The book for veterans is less good, because it's just a bunch of stuff Shattuck has written over the years. But if you've read Proust and want an intelligent man's understanding of the thing, this is enjoyable enough. Shattuck suggests that the book is about desire as much as it is memory; human beings fail to understand their own desires, which leads to suffering. A new vision of life (literary critics always end up with these wild generalities: why can't a book be about society and art? Why do they have to be about 'life' and 'love'?) follows.

More helpful was Shattuck's take on the 'memory' theme; he understands Search less as an investigation of memory than as showing how an objective observer can combine a vision of memory and the present to better understand the past and the future. I think. He also stands against the aestheticist view that the novel holds art up as superior to life. A worthy argument, for all its generality.

There are also completely unrelated bits on translation, editions, and an almost unbearable 'creative response' to the novel.

If you love Proust, this is worth reading; if you're about to read Proust, half of it is worth reading; if you've read Proust and might not read him again, this won't change your mind, and you should avoid it, because you should absolutely read Proust again. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
Seems more insightful and helpful the further I get with In Search of Lost Time. This is a guide for the ages. ( )
  CSRodgers | Aug 2, 2014 |
Proust, Marcel, 1871-1922. A la recherche du/temps perdu
  Budzul | Jun 1, 2008 |
For many years, Roger Shattuck has been mesmerised by one write. First came "Proust's Binoculars", a short, brilliant study published in 1964. Then came "Marcel Proust", commissioned by Frank Kermode for the Modern Masters series, which won the National Book Ward in 1974. A series of essays, lectures and reviews followed. Now, like Richard Ellmann, whose constant outpourings on Joyce resulted in his triumphant biography "James Joyce", Roger Shattuck has revisited his earlier writings and musings on Proust, and used them as a springboard to write a new and definitive work. Devoting particular attention to Proust's masterpiece "In Search of Lost Time", Shattuck laments his subject's defencelessness against zealous editors, praises some translations, examines Proust's place on the path of aesthetic decadence blazed by Baudelaire and Wilde, and presents him as a novelist whose philosophical gifts were matched by his irrepressible comic sense. This book is the culmination of a lifetime of scholarship; it should delight and enthral readers, and serve as the next generation's guide to Proust.
4 vote antimuzak | Nov 22, 2005 |
Mostrando 4 de 4
Shattuck is very good, for instance, in explaining the nature of the double ''I'' of Proustian narration…He demonstrates that the recognitions we are led to don't ultimately promote an ideology of art but rather an illumination of life. Again and again, he directs us to the rich social life of the ''Search,'' to its high comedy and to its ultimate high stakes: understanding. Art is, in Proust's term, a ''translation'' of life. Proust's novel -- like all great fiction -- is ultimately cognitive in its nature and its rewards.

Much of Shattuck's argument will be familiar to readers of his two earlier books on Proust, ''Proust's Binoculars'' (1963) and ''Marcel Proust'' (1974). Indeed, the lion's share of ''Proust's Way'' recycles them, with some reorganization and with some additional material, part of it published as articles in The New York Review of Books and elsewhere. Like Proust himself, Shattuck seems to have been rewriting the same book for a number of years, seeking to find its best form. Unlike Proust, however, he doesn't find much to change in his initial versions, and in fact for me the freshest and most exciting part of ''Proust's Way'' remains the material on optics and vision adapted from ''Proust's Binoculars.''
adicionada por davidcla | editarNew York Times, Peter Books (Jun 11, 2000)
 
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An illuminating work that serves as both an introduction to Proust--perhaps Europe's most enduring twentieth-century novelist--and a searching reinterpretation of his work. Since beginning his career, Roger Shattuck has been mesmerized by one writer. First came Proust's Binoculars, a short, brilliant study published in 1964. Then came Marcel Proust, commissioned by Frank Kermode for the Modern Masters series, which won the National Book Award in 1974. A series of essays, lectures, and reviews followed. Now, like Richard Ellmann, whose constant outpourings on Joyce resulted in his triumphant biography James Joyce, Roger Shattuck written a new and definitive work. Devoting special care to Proust's masterpiece In Search of Lost Time (traditionally translated as Remembrance of Things Past), Shattuck laments his subject's defenselessness against zealous editors, praises some translations, examines Proust's place in the path of aesthetic decadence blazed by Baudelaire and Wilde, and presents Proust as a novelist whose philosophical gifts were matched by his irrepressible comic sense. Proust's Way, the culmination of a lifetime of scholarship, will serve as the next generation's guide to Proust.

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