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The lost future of Pepperharrow por Natasha…
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The lost future of Pepperharrow (edição 2020)

por Natasha Pulley

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14510145,558 (3.73)12
Natasha Pulley's Watchmaker of Filigree Street captivated readers with its charming blend of historical fiction, fantasy, and steampunk. Now, Pulley revisits her beloved characters in a sequel that sweeps readers off to Japan in the 1880s, where nationalism is on the rise and ghosts roam the streets. 1888. Five years after they met in The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, Thaniel Steepleton, an unassuming translator, and Keita Mori, the watchmaker who remembers the future, are traveling to Japan. Thaniel has received an unexpected posting to the British legation in Tokyo, and Mori has business that is taking him to Yokohama. Thaniel's brief is odd: the legation staff have been seeing ghosts, and Thaniel's first task is to find out what's really going on. But while staying with Mori, he starts to experience ghostly happenings himself. For reasons Mori won't--or can't--share, he is frightened. Then he vanishes. Meanwhile, something strange is happening in a frozen labor camp in Northern Japan. Takiko Pepperharrow, an old friend of Mori's, must investigate. As the weather turns bizarrely electrical and ghosts haunt the country from Tokyo to Aokigahara forest, Thaniel grows convinced that it all has something to do with Mori's disappearance--and that Mori may be in serious danger.… (mais)
Membro:photonegative
Título:The lost future of Pepperharrow
Autores:Natasha Pulley
Informação:London : Bloomsbury, 2020.
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

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The Lost Future of Pepperharrow por Natasha Pulley

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Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Back in the steampunk world of Thaniel and Mori but this time we are headed to Japan. A sequel where we discover lots of Keita Mori's backstory and his ancestral home. I found this book pretty slow to get into and the middle was fairly confusing, but it does all come together at the end and all makes sense. ( )
  CharlotteBurt | Feb 1, 2021 |
I feel like I'll be thinking about this one for a long time and will definitely have to reread. The storyline was complex but beautiful woven together. At the end I was like, "He told us! He told us all along and we didn't know it!" and that's just brilliant. ( )
  RachellErnst | Jan 5, 2021 |
'Chocolate?' Mori said to her.
'Yes!' she squeaked, full of joy. He didn't usually let her have anything sweet. There was a reason, he said, that white people were all fat and short-lived. ( )
  Jon_Hansen | Oct 30, 2020 |
I don’t know whether this book was genuinely weaker than The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, whether I read it at the wrong time, or whether I fell so hard for Watchmaker that no sequel would ever hold up, but I didn’t enjoy this nearly as much as I thought I was going to. Which is to say this is a perfectly entertaining story and a lovely return to the world, and has some marvelously inventive bits, but I wasn’t swooning.

People who like Thaniel, Mori, Thaniel-and-Mori, Pulley’s plotting, her asides and general quirkiness, or who want to see more of Six, will close the book happy. So will the people who liked the aether and steampunk stuff from Watchmaker, or want more timey-wimeyness and precognitive and/or gay angst. There are some very tense sequences, some painfully sad moments, a lot of wondering what is going on, and enough sweet, cute moments to balance things out. It is, basically, a fitting sequel and a good cap to Thaniel and Mori’s tale. (At least, I assume it’s the end.)

I also liked that Pulley doesn’t truly lean into the idea that 1880s Japan was somehow better than either modern Japan or the rest of the 1880s world. Yes, there are scenes and settings that are beautiful, gentle, and feel distinctly … Miyazaki, shall we say, but there are also grimier, working class settings, and discontent and inequality on several levels. That’s another continuation from Watchmaker, by the way, but done on a wider scale simply because Japan is larger than London and so Pulley has more scope to work with.

Also: the stuff with the ghosts was very cool, even if/because it was kind of weird and creepy, and the final reveals were great. Six, who’s basically confirmed here as autistic, was an absolute delight, as was watching Thaniel and Mori be her dads. A lot of stuff about Mori’s personality makes much more sense now too. So lots of wonderful things! Yes!

But, I don’t know…. I think I was meant to like one of the main Japanese characters more than I did, and I remember connecting to Thaniel more in Watchmaker, and I feel like some of the foreshadowing was overdone and I could have stood to know less about what was coming. Overall, the reading experience didn’t feel as rich in general, either, for all that there’s still plenty of detail and Pulley’s style hasn’t really changed—but maybe that just means it’s been a few years, my taste have changed, I’ve forgotten things, it might be time to mount a reread, etc.

Still, this is a solidly plotted novel, a good sequel, and an enjoyable read with a lot of lightness and humour as well as tension and tragedy. It’s definitely a Pulley novel and I’m glad I picked it up. I just can’t shake the feeling it could have, somehow, been better.

To bear in mind: Contains depictions of anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, jail, riots, and people who think they’re justified treating others as less-than.
7/10 ( )
2 vote NinjaMuse | Sep 4, 2020 |
Much the weakest of the three books in what I imagine is now concluded as a trilogy (although the author leaves wriggle-room at the end to continue the series -- although if we can expect more of this sort of thing, my opinion is that we're better off without any further books).

Worth reading if you've read the first two I suppose (I thought that both of them were great; if anything I give The Bedlam Stacks the edge) -- without this one I for one would have been left frustrated at the lack of further books, but I cannot help thinking that this one was written for purposes quite different than the desire to write a good story about interesting characters. If she does decide to do another one in this series, then, unlike this one, I won't be rushing out to buy it as soon as it comes out in hardback; I'll wait for some reviews first. ( )
  N7DR | Jul 16, 2020 |
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Natasha Pulley's Watchmaker of Filigree Street captivated readers with its charming blend of historical fiction, fantasy, and steampunk. Now, Pulley revisits her beloved characters in a sequel that sweeps readers off to Japan in the 1880s, where nationalism is on the rise and ghosts roam the streets. 1888. Five years after they met in The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, Thaniel Steepleton, an unassuming translator, and Keita Mori, the watchmaker who remembers the future, are traveling to Japan. Thaniel has received an unexpected posting to the British legation in Tokyo, and Mori has business that is taking him to Yokohama. Thaniel's brief is odd: the legation staff have been seeing ghosts, and Thaniel's first task is to find out what's really going on. But while staying with Mori, he starts to experience ghostly happenings himself. For reasons Mori won't--or can't--share, he is frightened. Then he vanishes. Meanwhile, something strange is happening in a frozen labor camp in Northern Japan. Takiko Pepperharrow, an old friend of Mori's, must investigate. As the weather turns bizarrely electrical and ghosts haunt the country from Tokyo to Aokigahara forest, Thaniel grows convinced that it all has something to do with Mori's disappearance--and that Mori may be in serious danger.

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