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The Writer's Map: An Atlas of Imaginary…
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The Writer's Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands (original 2018; edição 2018)

por Huw Lewis-Jones (Editor)

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234486,682 (4.19)4
Photography & Illustrated Travel Book of the Year at the Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards 2019Maps can transport us, they are filled with wonder, the possibility of real adventure and travels of the mind. This is an atlas of the journeys that writers make, encompassing not only the maps that actually appear in their books, but also the many maps that have inspired them and the sketches that they use in writing. For some, making a map is absolutely central to the craft of shaping and telling their tale. A writer's map might mean also the geographies they describe, the worlds inside books that rise from the page, mapped or unmapped, and the realms that authors inhabit as they write. Philip Pullman recounts a map he drew for an early novel; Robert Macfarlane reflects on his cartophilia, set off by Robert Louis Stevenson and his map of Treasure Island; Joanne Harris tells of her fascination with Norse maps of the universe; Reif Larsen writes about our dependence on GPS and the impulse to map our experience; Daniel Reeve describes drawing maps and charts for The Hobbit trilogy of films; Miraphora Mina recalls creating 'The Marauder's Map' for the Harry Potter films; David Mitchell leads us to the Mappa Mundi by way of Cloud Atlas and his own sketch maps. And there's much more besides. Amidst a cornucopia of images, there are maps of the world as envisaged in medieval times, as well as maps of adventure, sci-fi and fantasy, maps from nursery stories, literary classics, collectible comics - a vast range of genres.… (mais)
Membro:LDPace
Título:The Writer's Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands
Autores:Huw Lewis-Jones (Editor)
Informação:Thames and Hudson Ltd (2018), Edition: 01, 256 pages
Colecções:Unowned, A sua biblioteca, Read
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Writer's Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands por Huw Lewis-Jones (2018)

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Spectacular. A wonderful resource. ( )
  MaximusStripus | Jul 7, 2020 |
The Writer’s Map has to be one of the most interesting concepts for a book that I’ve seen in quite some time. Within its pages, the reader is introduced to the great imaginary literary worlds and the maps that inspired them and the maps that came from their stories and descriptions. The book is divided into several section, with each being written by a current author or illustrator. Details are given as to what fueled their love for writing about faraway places or their experiences that led to their interest in literary maps. The sections hit upon such famous maps and places as Mordor, The Marauders Map, PL Travers London, Treaure Island and many more. I always appreciate a glimpse into the history of books and the authors who write them, so I was fascinated with this unique topic.

I do think a physical book would be the best format for this read, as it would enable the reader a better way to really view all of the details in the photos of the maps provided.

Overall, this was truly a unique look into both the history of maps and imaginary worlds and, also the stories behind our favorite authors.

I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher given in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  BookishHooker | Dec 16, 2019 |
This is first and foremost a coffee table book to look at and marvel: it’s full of imagined maps, old and new, mostly made to accompany stories ranging from Gulliver's Travels or Robinson Crusoe to Lord of the Rings, Narnia, and Peter Pan. Various writers and illustrators testify to their fascination for maps and how they portray the real reality, or the reality of a story. Because that is a recurring theme: reality and imagination are only separated by a vague dividing line, and in many cases they run together.
Editor Huw Lewis-Jones aptly puts it this way: “maps are invitations. We can read them, read with them, draw and redraw them, use them, share them, add and alter them, enter into them. As representations, they are always partial, always incomplete, and yet they always offer us more than what is held there on paper alone. Maps begin a story. They send us off on new journeys, set our feet moving and our minds racing. Maps inform us and they encourage wonder. Maps give us guidance and direction, and show us the range of a territory, but they can only ever suggest a greater whole. The rest is up to you ”. I think that says it all. ( )
1 vote bookomaniac | Mar 28, 2019 |
We love maps and atlases. We have a very large collection of atlases, and maps adorn most of our walls. Jim likes historical and topographic maps, and I prefer maps of fantasy lands. This gorgeous book, which features all kinds of maps along with essays about them, is the perfect addition to our library, but not one to file; rather, it will stay out, to be savored over and over again.

Most of the authors who have contributed to this book report having spent hours in their own childhoods looking at maps and imagining the worlds depicted in them. I too, spent hours doing so, beginning with maps in The Story of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting. Even today, when I read a fantasy with a map at the beginning, I return to it over and over as I read.

The essays in the book are delightful, but it is the illustrations that accompany the text that make this book so wonderful. It includes famous maps as well as idiosyncratic maps that inspired writers, often on two page colorful spreads. For example, one can spend hours examining the details of “The Land of Make Believe” drawn by Jaro Hess in 1930. It shows everything from “Old Mother Hubbard’s Place” to the hill climbed by Jack and Jill. Other landmarks indicate that “Peter Rabbit Lived in This Hole” and “Here the Blackbird Picked Off The Maid’s Hose.”

In Huw Lewis-Jones’s own chapter, he opines:

“[It is] what is not on the map [that] proves tantalizing. The edges of the maps, the blanks, the borderlands, this is where many writers, myself included, are inexorably drawn. It’s good to head to places where we’re not sure what is going to happen.”

I, on the other hand, am drawn to what is included. My favorite maps when I was little were maps from the earliest times that had features like the representations of the four winds in each corner, turtles holding up the world, or dragons in the unknown areas.

Lewis-Jones reports that the first atlases were made in sixteenth-century Italy, containing many features from classical mythology, such as a representation of Atlas holding up the Earth. [In Greek mythology, Atlas was a Titan condemned to hold up the sky for eternity. The great cartographer Gerardus Mercator, born in 1512, was the first to title a collection of maps (and a treatise on the universe) as an "atlas." He chose the word as a commemoration of the legendary King Atlas of Mauretania whom he considered to be the first great geographer. This King Atlas was a son of the Titan Atlas but the two myths coalesced.]

Individual maps were made much earlier; this book includes a reproduction of Ptolemy’s world map from 1482 - the first to appear in color.

The historical maps reveal much about the state of epistemology at the time. We saw some wonderful early maps in the Vatican Gallery of Maps in Rome, and notably they reveal religious conceptions of the shape of the world, with Jerusalem at the center.

Lewis-Jones also uses the idea of mapping as a metaphor for the way authors plot out a story as part of their creative process. Readers can often "see" such maps hovering above texts when, for example, they dive into mysteries with red herrings and/or clues strewn throughout the text - these elements had to be figured out in advance, with physical or mental maps carefully followed so both author and readers wouldn’t get lost along the way.

Sometimes writers don’t include actual maps in their work, but depict places so real you envision them yourselves, as, Lewis-Jones points out, did Samuel Taylor Coleridge in his poem “Kubla Khan”, which begins:

"In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round;
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery."

Maps in the book that also have essays about them include Robert Louis Stevenson’s story of Treasure Island, Jonathan Swift’s tales of Gulliver’s Travels, A. A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh (with maps of the Hundred Acre Wood), C.S. Lewis in The Chronicles of Narnia, the Mary Poppins books by P.L. Travers (illustrated by Mary Shepard, whose father E.H.Shepard had drawn Winnie-the-Pooh), and of course the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. The works of some authors have inspired maps to be made by others, like J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books. As one essay notes, “Each new generation finds its favourite literary maps…”

Isabel Greenberg, in her chapter, expresses the opinion:

“Maps of places that would be impossible to traverse in reality, or visit, are the ones that are most exciting: Faerie, Heaven, the Constellations, Middle-earth, Earthsea; even old maps of our Earth, long before we knew what lay beyond the fringes of experience. The kind of maps with wide-eyed women blowing winds from the four corners, and shaky, beautiful penned lines. It doesn’t matter that you can’t follow them; in fact that makes them better.”

I totally agree. And this book allows you to visit many of those types of maps over and over, via not only the essays but also from the 167 beautiful full-color images. Chapters include, inter alia, not only discussions of grid maps and story maps, but explorations of women cartographers, anatomical maps, maps of other planets, and a survey of discoveries that were made in pursuit of erroneous information on maps (e.g., the discovery of America).

Huw Lewis-Jones wraps up the book by discussing the accuracy of Google Earth maps, juxtaposing these maps with the need we retain for “there to be some mystery in the world”:

“Imaginary places can offer us new kinds of discovery. Some of the pleasure of spending time with maps comes not only from the idea of exploring areas unknown, but also from remembering that where we stand is just a small part of a massive, and bewildering, whole. Maps remind us that there is so much more out there, and so much more at stake.”

Evaluation: What a great gift this book would make to any lucky recipient who still takes time to revel in travels of the imagination. It is true the book primarily highlights works done in the West, and a companion book that would include more diverse contributions and influences would be most welcome. Nevertheless, it is highly recommended. ( )
  nbmars | Dec 3, 2018 |
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Photography & Illustrated Travel Book of the Year at the Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards 2019Maps can transport us, they are filled with wonder, the possibility of real adventure and travels of the mind. This is an atlas of the journeys that writers make, encompassing not only the maps that actually appear in their books, but also the many maps that have inspired them and the sketches that they use in writing. For some, making a map is absolutely central to the craft of shaping and telling their tale. A writer's map might mean also the geographies they describe, the worlds inside books that rise from the page, mapped or unmapped, and the realms that authors inhabit as they write. Philip Pullman recounts a map he drew for an early novel; Robert Macfarlane reflects on his cartophilia, set off by Robert Louis Stevenson and his map of Treasure Island; Joanne Harris tells of her fascination with Norse maps of the universe; Reif Larsen writes about our dependence on GPS and the impulse to map our experience; Daniel Reeve describes drawing maps and charts for The Hobbit trilogy of films; Miraphora Mina recalls creating 'The Marauder's Map' for the Harry Potter films; David Mitchell leads us to the Mappa Mundi by way of Cloud Atlas and his own sketch maps. And there's much more besides. Amidst a cornucopia of images, there are maps of the world as envisaged in medieval times, as well as maps of adventure, sci-fi and fantasy, maps from nursery stories, literary classics, collectible comics - a vast range of genres.

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