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Vox por Christina Dalcher
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Vox (edição 2018)

por Christina Dalcher (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
9928915,394 (3.62)42
On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.… (mais)
Membro:CatherineMachineGun
Título:Vox
Autores:Christina Dalcher (Autor)
Informação:Berkley (2018), Edition: 1st Edition, 336 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:bechdel-pass, feminism, literary-fiction, maryland, reddit-recommends

Pormenores da obra

Vox por Christina Dalcher

  1. 30
    The Handmaid's Tale por Margaret Atwood (vwinsloe)
  2. 10
    Native Tongue por Suzette Haden Elgin (2wonderY)
    2wonderY: Women's right have been removed. They develop a private language. This is a minor classic.
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» Ver também 42 menções

Inglês (84)  Piratês (1)  Alemão (1)  Todas as línguas (86)
Mostrando 1-5 de 86 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I can’t say that I totally loved this book but I didn’t hate it either. It definitely had some aspects of the other dystopian novels out there now, but I enjoyed the few unique ideas. Imagining a world such as the one in this book is a bit scary, especially as women.
That said, I read for enjoyment and if I learn something along the way even better. I’ve read a lot of controversial reviews about this book. I try to take it for what it is and not read too much into a fictional novel. As with everything we’re all entitled to our own opinions. ( )
  purple_pisces22 | Mar 14, 2021 |
I bought this book as I just kept seeing it everywhere. It appeared in my Amazon suggested books feed, it was prominently displayed in bookshops I went into, and the charity bookshops I visit almost always had a copy. The cover is bright red and dark black which makes it really stand out. It instantly reminded me of The Power by Naomi Alderman as that book also had a bright red cover and is also what I guess you could term feminist-lit. They come from different publishers but I do wonder if there was a common cover designer. One thing that did concern me was the sources used for the attention grabbing promotional quotes. They all came from the likes of Heat, Prima, Bella, and the Daily Mail. In general I try not to be too sniffy about books but there were no recommendations from any source I would consider trustworthy when it comes to books. Or anything in the case of the Daily Mail. Anyway, onwards.



The premise sounded very promising to me and there is a lot that could be done with it so I jumped in without reading anything about it beforehand. As you would expect, the book starts off by pretty much laying out the situation in the America detailed in the synopsis. We find out that Jean was a hugely talented scientist who specializes in aphasia experience by people who have suffered some form of brain injury like a stroke. All that changed with a political change in the USA and she now spends her time at home and limited to 100 words a day. She feels her husband is a coward for not standing up when the current situation was developing and in his general attitude towards how thing are. This comes across are a double standard as Jean readily admits that she didn't get involved either despite being encouraged to by one of her college friends. She seems to hate her eldest son because he is becoming someone who disregards women due to his teaching at school. There is also a barely disguised attack on Christianity as a whole. The political leaders are kept in power by one of these crazy TV preachers we see from time to time (think Kenneth Copeland). So Christianity is an evil force in the book but somehow this has only affected America as the Christians in every other country are the same as we know them to be today, a mixed bunch just like any other demographic. I have no real issue with questioning religion, even in a forceful way at times, but Dalcher uses such a broad brush every Christian is condemned.



This attitude towards Christianity also applies to every single man in the book apart from two, one of who is a hunky Italian that she is having an affair with. Her husband Patrick is a particular target throughout. She hates him because he didn't try to change the political change that was happening. He is a governmental scientific specialist so I would imagine that to keep his position he would need to toe the line but this doesn't seem to occur to Jean. She also hates the fact that he is the kind of guy who would ignore provocation instead of 'beating the s**t out of someone'. Yeah, I'm going to judge you if that is your outlook on life. If more people learned to turn the other cheek when violence clearly isn't the solution, the world would be a better place.



All of the above had me seriously conflicted while I was reading the book. Dalcher can clearly write good prose as I flew through the book in no time at all and I kept wanted to know what happened next. The ending feels very rushed compared to the rest of the book which is a shame. The conclusion feels like she didn't know where to go with it and as a result, its messy and far too convienient. The arc of one of the main characters at the end of the book is so different to the rest of the book that it really undermines what I think Dalcher was going for from the start (I'm trying to explain without spoilers and its difficult, hopefully those who have read the book will understand). Due to premise and the quality of the writing I think that 2/5 is about right despite the huge flaws. As Mark Kermode would say, it is not without merit. In the end I think Dalcher's biggest problem is that there is no nuance in her arguments. It's all black and white when shades of grey should have been present from the very beginning. ( )
  Brian. | Mar 10, 2021 |
The story hits a particular nerve with the subject matter, however, the ending of the book felt so unbelievable and rushed that it cheapened the story a bit. ( )
  thereserose5 | Mar 3, 2021 |
I have mixed emotions after reading this book. This is probably one of the hardest reviews I've ever had to write. It took me a couple days of thinking it over before I could figure out what I needed to say....and then the right words to say it.

I wanted so badly to enjoy and really "feel'' this story. But it really didn't work for me. On the one hand, as a woman, I totally understand what it's trying to say. But, on the other hand, I didn't enjoy the way it went about it. As a reviewer, I have to be honest. I really never felt plugged into the plot. I'm a strong enough woman to go against the flow and say I really didn't like this book. I almost DNF'd it....but I felt it was important that I stuck with it until the end.

Vox is set in a future America where women have lost the right to speak, to be educated, and even to write. The female main character, Jean McClellan, was a neurologist before a ultra conservative right wing government took all women out of the workforce, sending them home to be almost completely silent homemakers. She can no longer be a doctor. She can no longer write poetry. She can't even have a passport. And any woman, even children, who speak more than the 100 word limit in a day receive a very painful electric shock. Women have effectively been silenced.

This is an intriguing premise, and I jumped right on the chance to read an ARC of this book. But, in places, the plot and characterizations just fell a bit flat for me. The situation is painted so bleak and dark and inescapable that at times it came off as a bit too melodramatic or over-the-top -- not really believable. I could see women being banned from public office, important positions such as doctors and lawyers and maybe even being restricted from attending college. But, a world where women aren't allowed to read books, write down words or speak above a word limit just seemed silly to me. Is the story making an important statement? Yes. But, I'm going to be honest and say that while the premise is excellent....the execution of it could be better. There is truth in the fact that it is possible for a group of people to be singled out, victimized, mistreated and even killed by an out of control goverment and populus. Look at what Germany did to Jews during World War II. Millions murdered, tortured, starved to death....for utterly ridiculous reasons based on pseudoscience and racist BS. So, it can happen. And has happened. Still happens. But, the idea of women being forced to wear word counter bracelets and being shocked for speaking, books being locked up in cabinets so women can't read and females being restricted from most areas of the work force just seems a bit of an overkill. An honest review means an honest review....the plot came off as a bit forced and melodramatic to me several times as I was reading. BUT, after I say that, I do have to add that it also made me angry and caused me to really think about instances from my own life where I felt silenced or powerless because I'm a woman. I was brutalized and raped by a man who felt belittled by my intelligence and success. And he made it out to be my fault. I "made him do it.'' Really?? As a child I was told by an adult close to me that I was "nothing, and was never going to be anything.'' Really?? And when I was struggling to raise my son alone after a divorce and asked my employer for a raise, his response was "Don't you get child support?'' Really? Would a man have been treated that way? I deserved that raise! Or the time I was offered an envelope filled with cash by a married man if I would agree to have sex with him. Really? So, believe me....I "get'' it. I've lived it. I just didn't totally buy the version in this book.

This story is definitely thought provoking. And it definitely had an impact on me. But I really wish I had liked it more than I did.

**I voluntarily read an advance readers copy of this book Berkley via FirstToRead. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.** ( )
  JuliW | Nov 22, 2020 |
This book caused me to value my voice in a way that I haven’t before. An exploration on what could happen if women were not valued for their voice and minds. The main character fights for her and her daughters right to speak more than 100 words a day. This book was terrifying to read because the reality is that it is not only so easy to take women’s rights for granted, they could easily be taken away.

Dalcher writes an insightful novel that might hit a little close to home. She weaves in science fiction with a reflection on women’s rights. It starts a little slow, but the end is packed with quick paced action. This quick read will definitely give you a lot to think about! This is a book that will not be easily forgotten. ( )
  hilarymichelle001 | Nov 3, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 86 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Subtlety is not a concern here, and the theme of “wake up!” is hammered home so vigorously that it can feel hectoring. “Not your fault,” a man says to Jean. “But it is,” she thinks. “My fault started two decades ago, the first time I didn’t vote … was too busy to go on [a march].” It’s of a piece with the preposterous setup, the payoff-heavy writing and the casual appropriation of some of humanity’s most heinous instruments of oppression – labour camps, electrified restraints – in the service of a thriller. If Dalcher wants to scare people into waking up, she would do better to send them back to the history books, rather than forward into an overblown, hastily imagined future.
adicionada por -pilgrim- | editarThe Guardian, Carrie O'Grady (Aug 22, 2018)
 

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On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.

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