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Say nothing : a true story of murder and…
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Say nothing : a true story of murder and memory in Northern Ireland (edição 2019)

por Patrick Radden Keefe

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1,3667010,488 (4.43)112
""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--… (mais)
Membro:The_Paynes
Título:Say nothing : a true story of murder and memory in Northern Ireland
Autores:Patrick Radden Keefe
Informação:New York : Doubleday, [2019]
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland por Patrick Radden Keefe (Author)

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Going into this book, I was not entirely unfamiliar with the Troubles in that I knew it was a time period and a conflict that took place in Ireland. Beyond that however, I was entirely uninformed on the topic. I am an American and detailed Irish history is not really part of our curriculum. This book was a fascinating and devastating look at this time period and the actual individual lives that were affected by this struggle.

Though this is not just a history of the troubles, Keefe does an excellent job familiarizing the reading with the conflict before diving into explorations of specific individual experiences. When discussing this book with my parents they talked about how they remember seeing some of the events described on the news. I was not alive during most of the events described in this book or I was very young. But, even though I did not remember any of these events actually occurring, I never felt lost or confused about the timeline of events.

I think Keefe being an Irish-American author helped with the telling of this story as it gave him a more distanced view of the events and allowed him to tell the events and the beliefs of the Irish republicans neutrally. I am not someone who thinks that journalists or authors always need to be completely neutral in the topics they cover but when discussing such as fraught issue as the one described in this book where people will naturally disagree on on I think it's good for the author to leave their own opinions at the door. There will never be a time in which people will all agree on whether revolts or protests that involve violence are necessary. Some people will look at instances of government violence or oppression and say that the only way to reach an outcome they want is to respond with violence. Others will say violence has no place in struggles against oppression and using violence is counterproductive. By not communicating his own stance, Keefe allows readers to form opinions on the Troubles and the violence within that conflict for themselves.

I think this book is an excellent model for nonfiction storytelling and was absolutely an incredible resource for myself to learn more about this period of Irish history. ( )
  AKBouterse | Oct 14, 2021 |
I took this book on vacation with me, along with a pile of others. Nothing else got read until I finished this. It is that gripping, it is that good.

I will say, it was not what I expected. Looking at and reading the cover, you would assume it was a murder mystery. That person on the cover is the criminal. Not.

[a:Patrick Radden Keefe|197852|Patrick Radden Keefe|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1538163619p2/197852.jpg] does tell us the story of a murder, but wrapped in the story are the awful events of the Troubles in Ireland. Is this person on the cover a criminal? Or is she just another victim of the violence and religious persecution that enveloped Ireland? A week after finishing, I personally have still not made up mind.

There was a discomforting sense in Belfast that there was no place where you were truly secure: you would run inside to get away from a gun battle, only to run outside again for fear of a bomb.

I was a young teen in the 70's when I began reading the newspapers and seeing the story's of the bombings and killing in Ireland. At that time I really did not understand the cause. As I got a little older, I knew it was about beliefs, freedom and religion-by then I did not let it bother me. It did not have an effect on my world, typical callous teen/young adult attitude.

[a: Keefe|197852|Patrick Radden Keefe|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1538163619p2/197852.jpg] gives both sides of the conflict fair and equal time in the narrative. The book begins and ends with story of"the disappeared" and leaves you still debating who was right and who was wrong? So much killing and sadness, it is becoming more clear to me neither side won anything but heartaches and grief. ( )
  JBroda | Sep 24, 2021 |
By following a handful of key characters, including Dolours Price, Brendan Hughes, Jean McConville, and Gerry Adams, through the decades of the Troubles, Keefe puts the reader in the murk on the ground, focused especially on the "Provos" (Provisional IRA), with their violence and hunger strikes with the aim of getting the British out of Northern Ireland and gaining a united Ireland. Ultimately, some were contented with the Good Friday Agreement, which brought peace, while others were unsatisfied with the compromise.

Author's note, extensive notes, selected bibliography, index.

See also: Devil in the White City by Erik Larson, Peacerunner by Penn Rhodeen, Milkman by Anna Burns

Quotes

"Nothing is going to come out of this that is commensurate with the pain that you will put into it." (Eamonn McCann to Dolours Price, 46)

"the Belfast syndrome," a malady that was said to result from "living with constant terror, where the enemy is not easily identifiable and the violence is indiscriminate and arbitrary." [PTSD] (52)

"Everything is strange for the first few moments, then after a time normal existence seems strange." (Frank Kitson, 68)

Belfast could sometimes feel more like a small town than a city. Even before the Troubles, the civic culture of the place was clotted with unsubstantiated gossip. (98)

It was a case study in strategic insanity: the Irish were blowing up their own people in a misguided attempt to hurt the English, and the English hardly even noticed. (116)

Roisin McNearney (142)

"It is not those who inflict the most but those who suffer the most who will conquer." (Terence MacSwiney, 149)

The brinksmanship between the Price sisters and the British was described in language that recalled not just MacSwiney, but the Great Famine of the nineteenth century, in which a million people in Ireland were allowed to die of disease and starvation, and another million or more were forced to migrate. (151)

It was almost as if "defeat suited them better than victory...for there was a sense in which Irish republicanism thrived on oppression and the isolated exclusivity that came with it. (167)

That Britain might
Brand Ireland's fight
Eight hundred years of crime. (republican prisoners' song, protesting wearing prison uniforms, 170)

But with each escalating gesture, they seemed only to harden the resolve of their adversaries. Who would yield first? (171)

"Physical force is a sign of the desperation of the poor." (Father Alec Reid, 200)

These were ordinary, decent people who became involved in the republican movement only to see the conflict spiral into something that they could no longer control. (214)

The Belfast Project [at Boston College]...seemed to address an obvious shortcoming in the Good Friday Agreement. In their effort to bring about peace, the negotiators had focused on the future rather than the past....there was no provision for the creation of any sort of truth-and-reconciliation mechanism that might allow the people of Northern Ireland to address the sometimes murky and painful history of what had befallen their country over the previous three decades. (229)

...there was no formal process for attempting to figure out how to commemorate, or even to understand, the Troubles. (230)

"Whatever you say, say nothing" (Seamus Heaney, 230)

"a landscape that remembered everything that had happened in and to it" (Heaney, 265)

...the truth was that, from the beginning, the [British] authorities perceived the Provos as the main enemy...and regarded loyalist terror gangs as a sideshow - if not an unofficial state auxiliary. (273)

There was no mechanism through which amnesty might be granted in exchange for testimony....whatever the reality on the ground might have been, the Troubles was never declared a war. (277)

"I learned a long time ago, if you don't ask, you can't tell." (Gerry Adams, 315)

"We cannot keep pretending forty years of cruel war, of loss, of sacrifice, of prison, of inhumanity, has not affected each and every one of us in heart and soul and spirit." (Bernadette Devlin at Dolours Price's funeral, 322)

"Sometimes, we are imprisoned within ideals." (Eamonn McCann, 322)

Who should be held accountable for a shared history of violence? (329)

How will the truth of what really happened during the Troubles ever come out...if the authorities file murder charges against anyone who has the nerve to talk about it? (Anthony McIntyre a.k.a. Mackers, 334) ( )
  JennyArch | Sep 17, 2021 |
Digital audiobook read by Matthew Blaney

SUBTITLE: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland

From the book jacket: In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known at the Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the IRA was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. … Keefe’s book … uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with.

My reactions
I confess that while I had heard of “The Troubles” I had never really studied the causes of the conflict, nor did I closely follow the politics at play. I remember reading about bombings and noting how the London underground would be shut down due to bomb threats, but the events seemed so distant from my late teen / early adult years in America that I paid little attention.

I’m so glad that my F2F book club chose this book, because I learned about not only the conflict portrayed, but perhaps a little about how a young person becomes radicalized and how festering dissatisfaction can turn from angry rhetoric to acts of terrorism.

Keefe is an accomplished investigative journalist, and he certainly did his homework here. Of the book’s 443 pages, fully 90 were devoted to meticulous notes (printed in teeny tiny print) citing his sources. It was also very interesting reading about the role that the Boston College’s John J Burns Library archives played in some final conclusions.

Blaney does a superb job of narrating the audiobook. His Irish accent comes through, making me feel as if I’m listening the author, or the individuals profiled. The text copy does include photos sprinkled throughout, which, of course, are not accessible to the listener; I’m glad I had a copy of the hardcover edition on hand. ( )
  BookConcierge | Aug 20, 2021 |
I have never understood people who see the world as binary when it comes to right and wrong. Almost always it is shades of gray when you look at it and I can think of no better example that studying "the troubles" in Northern Ireland. This is an expansive book that takes a single kidnapping and disappearance and uses it as a starting point to examine Northern Ireland from around the 1960s through to the present day. That's a lot to cover but Mr. Keefe does it masterfully. I learned a whole lot from this book but it never felt like a lesson. The book moves along at a great clip and he weaves the people in and out of the narrative very deftly. This is one of those special non-fiction books for me that totally pulls you in, teaches you, and entertains you all at the same time. He presents the facts as facts and only rarely does he put forward his opinion but the facts often speak for themselves quite clearly. There is a section on whataboutism that should be required reading for everyone in this country. He refuses to give in to it and presents the facts of each atrocity as a discrete event which is how they should be viewed. I also came away more and more convinced that ANY extreme dogma, in this case either religion or nationalism, leads to trouble. We all need to try and find common ground and work out compromises. That is NOT a dirty word! Once you have determined that your view is absolutely right and nothing can move you from that, then you have given yourself the right to do anything in furtherance of it. As he so eloquently puts it, "even if one were to concede, for the sake of argument, that [person committed an offense], there is no moral universe in which her murder and disappearance should be justified." Indeed. There is a great turn of phrase in the book about the "derangement of bigotry" and boy are we seeing that in this country right now. This is a also a great book for looking at the way people change and evolve over time, and how time and distance affect memory and emotion. I can see why this book ended up on so many best of lists for last year. I also would love to see it presented as a documentary series at some point. ( )
  MarkMad | Jul 14, 2021 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Keefe, Patrick RaddenAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Archetti, StefanoArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Blaney, MatthewNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carella, MariaDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Clévy, Claire-MarieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gil, RicardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Munday, OliverDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--

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