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Infinite Detail: A Novel por Tim Maughan
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Infinite Detail: A Novel (original 2019; edição 2019)

por Tim Maughan (Autor)

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1717121,295 (3.98)6
BEFORE: In Bristol's center lies the Croft, a digital no-man's-land cut off from the surveillance, Big Data dependence, and corporate-sponsored, globally hegemonic aspirations that have overrun the rest of the world. Ten years in, it's become a center of creative counterculture. But it's fraying at the edges, radicalizing from inside. How will it fare when its chief architect, Rushdi Mannan, takes off to meet his boyfriend in New York City--now the apotheosis of the new techno-utopian global metropolis?AFTER: An act of anonymous cyberterrorism has permanently switched off the Internet. Global trade, travel, and communication have collapsed. The luxuries that characterized modern life are scarce. In the Croft, Mary--who has visions of people presumed dead--is sought out by grieving families seeking connections to lost ones. But does Mary have a gift or is she just hustling to stay alive? Like Grids, who runs the Croft's black market like personal turf. Or like Tyrone, who hoards music (culled from cassettes, the only medium to survive the crash) and tattered sneakers like treasure.The world of Infinite Detail is a small step shy of our own: utterly dependent on technology, constantly brokering autonomy and privacy for comfort and convenience. With Infinite Detail, Tim Maughan makes the hitherto-unimaginable come true: the End of the Internet, the End of the World as We Know It.… (mais)
Membro:rossarn
Título:Infinite Detail: A Novel
Autores:Tim Maughan (Autor)
Informação:MCD x FSG Originals (2019), 384 pages
Colecções:Lidos mas não possuídos
Avaliação:***1/2
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Infinite Detail: A Novel por Tim Maughan (2019)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This was one of the better recent sci-fi novels i've read. The extrapolation on how current ad/data grabbing trends and smart cities etc would evolve was well done, both in how it was portrayed as well as in how real it felt. I thought that it could have gone farther in some aspects (more on the systems that are used and how they affect people not interested in them etc./the futility of it all), but I still really liked it. ( )
  102joa82 | Jan 1, 2021 |
In short, in my opinion Infinite Detail is a must read book. Not just because it’s a great story but also this is the type of speculative/science fiction we need more today.

More: https://ahmetasabanci.com/infinite-detail-by-tim-maughan/ ( )
  ahmetasabanci | Oct 13, 2020 |
This is one of those novels that delve deep into the lives of a richly imagined near-future that takes us on a trip to a dystopia that explores:

THE END OF THE INTERNET.

Honestly, I'm reminded quite a bit of William Gibson's style. It's a slow and careful build-up of situations and world-building that gives us a no man's land of internet outcasts, people who don't want to be spied on or tabulated for all kinds of data mining, the path that micro-society takes after ten years, and the world of a post-internet breakdown after that.

We get all the arguments and commentaries on our current lifestyles. We get the arguments for and against the business side, the surveillance state, and the desire to finally be free of it all. We spend more time with the last group and sympathize with them.

But honestly? This is a pretty pure dystopia that focuses the light not on single issues but spreading it all about among the deeply-drawn characters.

I can't express how much I was impressed by the quality of the details. Indeed, the title says it all.

However... I did not precisely fall in love with the basic story. It was okay, but the commentary was its master, spreading itself throughout all the cracks in the novel. That's not a bad thing. It's an impressive thing. I just didn't enjoy it as much as I feel I should have.

And really... despite our utter reliance on the internet today, would we really go that bonkers without it? ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Infinite Detail is a stunning debut novel that takes the novel form to a new form. To fully appreciate this please go and get the paper and ink version of the book. The formatting is part of the story and is just freaking beautiful. It is set 72 hours into the future, well not really, it is a near-future dystopian story. This near-future unlike other near-futures where the effect is more like: this is a near possibility it's like a 5-minutes set in the future near future, the new future of Infinite Detail is more like 72 hours its like a full on day or so. This near future is like an absurdist version of what we live in now; that is to say a broken economic and political system that is connected by a technological force that is controlled by said broken economic and political forces. The near future is our current state of affairs but with volume knobs that control the background noise brought up to 10, where you can really hear the undercurrent that Tim Maughan hears and sees. Maughan foregrounds all of these sinister forces behind of our daily comforts and what happens when all of it gets broken.

The story is beautifully written with a full cast of characters that matter and serve the greater themes of the story. It is so good. It is entertaining and it is scary and it is great story telling. It takes on themes of loss, corruption, connections, relationships, and motives, and what it means to survive and what we can and might and should or should let go of to move on with our lives and the idea of what it means to leave on world behind and what could happen to leave things behind and the ripple effect that takes place when one system effectively dies away and another one takes over and that the other one might not be better but it also might not be worse. It explores who we can feel sorry for and what it means to hate and why hate but also why love. ( )
  modioperandi | May 12, 2020 |
I finished Tim Maughan’s *Infinite Detail*. It’s ostensibly a book about what happens in the near future if the internet goes away. It’s really about human memory and its relationship to technology’s ability to augment that memory to the point of infinite detail. The pastiche of memories, churned and tumbled by time and their reconstruction during recall, puts a gauze of light between now and then. The infinite detail is the perfect recall of not a single photograph—with its limited perspective, its intentional omissions, its meaningful composition—but of *many* photographs and videos and depth maps and audio recordings and sensor data and vital signs, all taken together as a amalgam of objective truth and representation of the world. Human memory, soft and malleable as flesh, works at cross purposes with this infinite detail.

I liked the book. As far as genre books go, it’s fine. It’s not literary, and it’s not a hero’s journey or a story with a definitive beginning, middle, and end. The details of how “a worm, a virus” took down the internet by exploiting a structural flaw in TCP/IP don’t make any sense, but they don’t have to, and it would’ve been better if it were either explained more (Gödelian exploit after turning packet switching into its own Turning machine, or something out there like that) or explained less, with less specificity and less knowledge. It does seem like a somewhat plausible future. I don’t like the focus on a capitalistic view of what “ownership” is, though; that seems more fixed in the society Maughan writes than government, democracy, or shared purpose, which seems weird. (Can sci-fi authors please read *Revolution in Rojava*?)

There are a few weird ethical touchstones too: after killing many people and attempting to kill more, emotional hay is made over the execution of the killer, a tank driver, which seemed out of place as it came from a character that had recently killed someone out of unfounded and paranoid suspicion. The book also tries to make us feel sympathy for someone who basically commands child slaves in a labor camp, which doesn’t make sense and doesn’t work at all.

It’s worth reading, though, especially if you like speculative fiction and near-future sci-fi. ( )
  jtth | May 4, 2020 |
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BEFORE: In Bristol's center lies the Croft, a digital no-man's-land cut off from the surveillance, Big Data dependence, and corporate-sponsored, globally hegemonic aspirations that have overrun the rest of the world. Ten years in, it's become a center of creative counterculture. But it's fraying at the edges, radicalizing from inside. How will it fare when its chief architect, Rushdi Mannan, takes off to meet his boyfriend in New York City--now the apotheosis of the new techno-utopian global metropolis?AFTER: An act of anonymous cyberterrorism has permanently switched off the Internet. Global trade, travel, and communication have collapsed. The luxuries that characterized modern life are scarce. In the Croft, Mary--who has visions of people presumed dead--is sought out by grieving families seeking connections to lost ones. But does Mary have a gift or is she just hustling to stay alive? Like Grids, who runs the Croft's black market like personal turf. Or like Tyrone, who hoards music (culled from cassettes, the only medium to survive the crash) and tattered sneakers like treasure.The world of Infinite Detail is a small step shy of our own: utterly dependent on technology, constantly brokering autonomy and privacy for comfort and convenience. With Infinite Detail, Tim Maughan makes the hitherto-unimaginable come true: the End of the Internet, the End of the World as We Know It.

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