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Calm the F*ck Down: How to Control What You Can and Accept What You Can't So You Can Stop Freaking Out and Get On With Your Life (A No F*cks Given Guide) (2018)

por Sarah Knight

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Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:

Tame anxiety and take back control of your life with this no-f*cks-given guide from the bestselling author of The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck and Get Your Sh*t Together.


Do you spend more time worrying about problems than solving them? Do you let unexpected difficulties ruin your day and do "what ifs" keep you up at night? Sounds like you need to Calm the F*ck Down.

Just because things are falling apart doesn't mean YOU can't pull it together. Whether you're stressed about sh*t that hasn't happened yet or freaked out about sh*t that already has, the NoWorries method from "anti-guru" Sarah Knight helps you curb the anxiety and overthinking that's making everything worse. Calm the F*ck Down explains:

  • The Four Faces of Freaking Out??and their Flipsides
  • How to accept what you can't control
  • Productive Helpful Effective Worrying (PHEW)
  • The Three Principles of Dealing With It
  • And much more!
  • Find even more calm with the Calm the F*ck Down Journal.… (mais)

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    Mostrando 4 de 4
    Basically another self help book, but a good one. Gets the point across in a way one with anxiety would, and peppers it like a well meaning drunk aunt would. And you know what? Drunk aunts usually give good advice. ( )
      zenseiii | Dec 13, 2022 |
    An interesting reminder that freaking out will never solve the problem. Sarah Knight is quite sweary but quite no-nonsense. She accepts that bad things happen to people but she also offers realistic methods to deal with different bad things, most of which involve realising how realistic the panicking is and only dealing with those things that you can do something about, and definitely not putting off things that you can deal with that will in the long term cause more stress.
    I really found it an interesting read, made me think.

    Loved the phrase "If you're still bending, you're not breaking" ( )
      wyvernfriend | Nov 12, 2020 |
    I borrowed this from the library and bought Marie Kondo's book in the same week, and I think overall KonMari is proving far more useful. This whole book can be boiled down into the Serenity Prayer - God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference - and the flowchart the author helpfully supplies on page 154. Plus a lot of acronyms and anecdotes. Very witty, and she reminds the reader constantly that she is not a doctor and knows the difference between stressing out and Anxiety with a capital A, but eh. Glad I didn't pay for the honour. ( )
      AdonisGuilfoyle | Mar 10, 2019 |
    Best for: Anyone with anxiety, anyone who tends to worry a bunch, and/or anyone who can find themselves unsure of where to start when something bad happens.

    In a nutshell: Author Sarah Knight offers a way to think about the things that keep us up at night so they don’t take over our lives. She is not a doctor, and isn’t suggesting that people with mental health issues that amplify their tendency to worry simply need to calm the fuck down; this book is for those of us who wouldn’t have a diagnosis but still worry way more than we’d like to.

    Worth quoting: “Worrying is wasteful. It costs you time, energy, and/or money and gives you nothing useful in return.”

    Why I chose it: 2019. New Year! New You! Just kidding. I’m exactly the same today as I was yesterday. But one of my goals for this year is to reduce my anxiety. While traveling recently, I was distracted by the following worries: whether the tiny bump on my cat’s lip was something horrible or just an injury from wrestling with his brother; whether our flight was going to be delayed to the point of missing our connection; if our cat sitter was going to lock herself out of the house, leading our cats to die of hunger or thirst; whether the car reservation at our destination was properly confirmed. Looking over that list, you’ll see that approximately 0% of that was within my control at that moment, yet it was causing my shoulders to rise closer and closer to my ears. Then I saw this book and thought “yeah, I probably should calm the fuck down.”

    Review:
    I’ve read Ms. Knight’s other books, and while they weren’t always what I was looking for, I do like her style and tone. This is definitely my favorite of hers that I’ve read, and I think her approach is one that could really work for me. I’m going to share the basics below (mostly for my own information), but she doesn’t such a great job of illustrating her points — the tarantula story is especially clever — that you should definitely not take the below as a substitute for the real thing.Okay? Let’s go.

    The overarching theme is that we should try to get to a point where we can address our worries from a point of logic, not emotion. Hard to do, obviously. But here are the three big points:

    Acknowledge what has happened
    Accept what you cannot control
    Address what you can control

    Ms. Knight suggests there are four main faces your worry might take: anxiety, sadness, anger, or denial (she’s calls it ostriching). I have definitely seen my worry turn to anxiety and anger (with the occasional sadness thrown in); I’m not much for completely ignoring problems, but I can see how that might be appealing. This part is helpful if you’re not aware of how you tend to act in moments, but it’s not the most … necessary part of the book.

    That comes next, with her repetition around the “one question to rule them all”: Can I Control It? And can I control it within reason. Like, I can control never being the passenger in a plane crash by never flying, but that’s not an option for me. So, once I’m in the plane, can I control whether the plane gets there? Nope.

    This point is so key, and possibly so obvious to people who don’t find themselves staring at the ceiling at 3 AM because of something they said at work two weeks ago that literally no one cared about or noticed. But for the rest of us, it helps to be reminded.

    The second part of the book really focuses on treating worries logically. She asks us to take a worry and put it on a scale:

    Highly Unlikely
    Possible But Not Likely
    Likely
    Highly Likely
    Inevitable

    And then, determine the timing: is it outlying, imminent, or already happening? And then, can I control it?

    From there, she offers some tips on how to let go of the things that we can’t control. One option is PHEW (productive, helpful, and effective worrying), which is essentially taking action about certain things you can control. For example, with my cat’s lip, once I thought about how we could, if necessary, have a vet come to the home while the cat sitter is there and we’re on vacation, I stopped being so concerned (he’s fine, by the way).

    I have generally been fairly good at coming up with solutions to my anxieties, but letting go of the ones I can’t control has been challenging. I think a big part has been treating every worry as equally likely and imminent, which is just absurd. And this book has helped me recognize that.

    That said, I can always use some good tips for managing the shitstorms (her word) in my life, and part three of the book offers some. Her principles of dealing with shit include taking stock, identifying my realistic ideal outcome, and then triaging what needs to be done first, second, etc. She illustrates this section with loads of examples, which I enjoyed a lot.

    The final part is a choose your own adventure bit, meant to solidify all the concepts, but I didn’t find it to be as helpful. But others might enjoy it!

    Keep it / Donate it / Toss it: Keep it. Definitely. ( )
      ASKelmore | Jan 1, 2019 |
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    This is a book about anxiety - from the white noise of what-ifs to the white-hot terror of a full-blown crisis.
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    Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:

    Tame anxiety and take back control of your life with this no-f*cks-given guide from the bestselling author of The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck and Get Your Sh*t Together.


    Do you spend more time worrying about problems than solving them? Do you let unexpected difficulties ruin your day and do "what ifs" keep you up at night? Sounds like you need to Calm the F*ck Down.

    Just because things are falling apart doesn't mean YOU can't pull it together. Whether you're stressed about sh*t that hasn't happened yet or freaked out about sh*t that already has, the NoWorries method from "anti-guru" Sarah Knight helps you curb the anxiety and overthinking that's making everything worse. Calm the F*ck Down explains:

    The Four Faces of Freaking Out??and their Flipsides How to accept what you can't control Productive Helpful Effective Worrying (PHEW) The Three Principles of Dealing With It And much more!

    Find even more calm with the Calm the F*ck Down Journal.

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