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Carter Reads the Newspaper por Deborah…
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Carter Reads the Newspaper (edição 2019)

por Deborah Hopkinson (Autor), Don Tate (Ilustrador)

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606351,817 (4.36)Nenhum(a)
"Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well"--Provided by the publisher.… (mais)
Membro:EvergreenComm
Título:Carter Reads the Newspaper
Autores:Deborah Hopkinson (Autor)
Outros autores:Don Tate (Ilustrador)
Informação:Peachtree Publishing Company (2019), Edition: Illustrated, 36 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:biography, African Americans, Black history, diversity, non-fiction, newspapers, literacy, ECS new book 2020-21

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Carter Reads the Newspaper por Deborah Hopkinson

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Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) is best known as the father of Black History Month. However, he was also a scholar who sought out and preserved the story of Americans of African descent.

Read the recently published a picture book biography, then learn more at the website:

CARTER READS THE NEWSPAPER by Deborah Hopkinson traces the life of Carter Woodson from his childhood and life as a coal miner to his education and creation of Negro History Week in 1926.

The Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site from the National Park Service is a website that explores the life of this important historian.

Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site
https://www.nps.gov/cawo

ARC courtesy of Peachtree Publishers. ( )
  eduscapes | Apr 6, 2021 |
The author begins by explaining:

“Carter G. Woodson didn’t help people escape from slavery, start a bus strike, or lead a movement of millions. Yet without him, we might not have Black History Month.”

Woodson was born in Virginia in 1875 to former slaves. His family was poor, and Woodson could only attend school four months each year; he needed to help out on his family's farm the rest of the time or work other jobs to earn money for the household. One of his jobs was in a coal mine, which was extremely difficult and dangerous work. But the experience gave him the courage to face whatever came thereafter.

It was at the mine that Woodson met Oliver Jones, who made his home a reading room and asked Woodson to read the newspapers to the men who couldn’t read. When the men had questions, Woodson researched the answers.

Finally at age twenty, Woodson was able to quit the mine and start high school and then college. He earned a master’s degree at age 33. When he was 37, he got a Ph.D. in history from Harvard University, the second African American to attain this distinction after W. E. B. Du Bois.

Woodson later said that one of his Harvard professors contended that black people had no history. Woodson objected and the professor challenged him to prove him wrong. The author writes: “For the rest of his life, Carter did just that.”

In 1926, Woodson established the forerunner to Black History Month, called Negro History Week. He chose the second week of February to honor the birthdates of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. He also added a theme (changing it each year thereafter), because, according to ASALH, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History:

“When Carter G. Woodson established Negro History week in 1926, he realized the importance of providing a theme to focus the attention of the public. The intention has never been to dictate or limit the exploration of the Black experience, but to bring to the public’s attention important developments that merit emphasis.”

Woodson advertised the special week extensively, including through the newspapers, where he had gotten his earliest education. Hopkinson observed:

“The boy who began by reading the newspaper to others transformed the way people thought about history. He fought for a history based on truth - a history that includes all people. Carter G. Woodson didn’t just study history. He changed it. And we can too.”

The book concludes with afterwords by both author and illustrator, a list of internet resources, bibliography, and timeline.

Illustrator Don Tate said of this book, “I love stories that offer an opportunity to highlight the lives of little-known African-American heroes.” He wrote in his “Illustrator’s Note” that he did not have many opportunities to learn about Black history in school. Nor does his son, even in this generation. He pointed out in an interview, “My son learned about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks in school. But what about other important figures?”

Tate did extensive research to show what Woodson’s world might have looked like. He explained, “As the illustrator, I’m telling my people’s history. So, it’s particularly important for me to get the visuals right, best I can.” He added, “The illustrations do the work that the words cannot.”

To that end, Tate added thumbnail sketches of black leaders on the end papers that might inspire kids to find out more about these historical figures, and/or to spark conversations about the ideological slant to the stories we tell. These leaders are identified as part of the end matter of the book.

Evaluation: This uplifting story about a boy who loved learning and wanted to share what he discovered will inspire readers (recommended for age 6 and up). Perhaps it will even galvanize them to make their own efforts to engage historical texts and representations on social media. ( )
  nbmars | Nov 23, 2019 |
Carter G. Woodson is the father of Black History Month. This is a great story to look at celebrating history. This story will help young readers appreciate the man who didn't just study history, he helped change the world. ( )
  KPareti | Oct 10, 2019 |
Carter G Woodson, the founder of Black History Month, learned at an early age that education was important. He shared his enthusiasm with those around him, including reading the newspaper to coal miners. As Woodson got older, he realized the importance of history and decided to offer the world a chance to learn about the history of African Americans. Written in an easy narrative style, Carter Reads the Newspaper is both informative and entertaining. Mixed media illustrations showcase Woodson's life and times and celebrate historical African Americans who made memorable contributions to world history. ( )
  Librariankimmy | Oct 9, 2019 |
Wow! What a story!!
I love reading picture book biographies - I always learn something NEW! ( )
  melodyreads | Jun 11, 2019 |
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"Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well"--Provided by the publisher.

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