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Trust Exercise

por Susan Choi

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,0827718,879 (3.19)56
In 1982 in a southern city, David and Sarah, two freshmen at a highly competitive performing arts high school, thrive alongside their school peers in a rarified bubble, ambitiously devoting themselves to their studies--to music, to movement, to Shakespeare and, particularly, to classes taught by the magnetic acting teacher Mr. Kingsley. It is here in these halls that David and Sarah fall innocently and powerfully into first love. And also where, as this class of students rises through the ranks of high school, the outside world of family life and economic status, of academic pressure and the future, does not affect them--until it does--in a sudden spiral of events that brings a startling close to the first part of this novel.… (mais)
  1. 00
    Bellevue Square por Michael Redhill (beyondthefourthwall)
    beyondthefourthwall: Twisty, sly, well-constructed metafiction that rewards rereading.
  2. 00
    The Rehearsal por Eleanor Catton (beyondthefourthwall)
    beyondthefourthwall: Note: I acknowledge that a LibraryThing reviewer who read Choi's book before I did has also pointed out the similarity here.
  3. 00
    Pale Fire por Vladimir Nabokov (beyondthefourthwall)
    beyondthefourthwall: Choi follows in Nabokov's footsteps here with some gutsy, unflinching, open-ended metafiction. In both cases - trying to avoid spoilers here - there is a piece of writing, mysteriously incomplete, and much of the rest of the text is by someone who claims to have been a close friend of the author. But there are some pretty weird things going on slightly below the surface, and it's clear that some kind of big traumatic event has loomed over the whole thing. A considerable amount of room for interpretation ensues.… (mais)
  4. 00
    Fates and Furies por Lauren Groff (beyondthefourthwall)
    beyondthefourthwall: ...and then, halfway through, we discover that all is not as it seems.
  5. 00
    Afterworlds por Scott Westerfeld (beyondthefourthwall)
    beyondthefourthwall: Two authors' intense commitments to metafiction.
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» Ver também 56 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 77 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This was a book club selection. This novel follows some students at an elite performing arts high school as they engage in the worst of teen behaviors, the consequences of said behaviors, and their lives about 15-20 years later. The book has three "eras", the first of which is half the novel. I loathed this part. The unnecessarily vulgar language, the not entirely believable overly mature sex lives of the kids, and the awful depiction of (and reading/accents) the "English People", made me dread putting this book back on. The second "era" was really good and explained the necessity of disgusting first part. The third era was confusing and unsatisfying.
I see what the author was trying to do. It is extremely ambitious and I just don't think she pulled it off. The message is a little muddy but seems to involve themes of badly behaved rapey men/boys, women/girls who lack the confidence to take ownership of their own bodies, and a system that rewards talent even in the face of predatory behaviors. But there were too many loose ends. ( )
  technodiabla | Feb 28, 2024 |
I may have liked this more if I'd read the print version. The audiobook narrator in the first part was not my favorite. And listening to a book like this left me feeling more confused than if I'd read it (at least I think so). It is a super confusing book, especially the last part. Also, I read [b:Normal People|41057294|Normal People|Sally Rooney|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1571423190l/41057294._SY75_.jpg|59141209] earlier this year, which is also about an intense teen relationship and I liked it so much more than this.

Even though I'd really like to talk to someone about this book and try to figure out the confusing parts, I'm not sure I'd go so far as to ask anyone I know to read it. I wouldn't want to waste anyone's time. In the end, the effort to finish this didn't feel worth it.

UPDATE: I enjoyed this piece about the book way more than the book itself: https://www.newyorker.com/books/under-review/who-owns-a-story-trust-exercise-sus...

( )
1 vote LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
I'm not sure about this one. Three stars usually means a good, average novel. But this wasn't an average reading experience. I was ready to DNF pretty early in the novel but I knew the story shifted and wanted to understand the wide range of reviews. The first half was a bit of a rant-read (ugh, another adult novel about teenagers) and the second half gripped my attention but left me unsatisfied. Even so, I didn't hate it and I think I may want to re-read it. I'll wait to see if it sticks with me. ( )
1 vote mmcrawford | Dec 5, 2023 |
I’m not smart enough to understand it. ( )
  cathy.lemann | Mar 21, 2023 |
Typically I do not mind a time-hoppy narrative, a la The Hours, although it is not my favorite device as the late 90s and afterward sort of sucked the genre dry. I do mind overly dramatic teens and their inflated sense of importance, and I thought this book illustrated that quite well, but it didn't make it easier to handle. If you haven't experienced theater life at all, I doubt you'll like this book, as it will seem foreign to the point of absurdity. My disdain — for how theater teachers of the era in which this takes place and the level of overblown ego they seem to invoke in their students, the superiority complexes and inferiority complexes covered up by thinking they are so unique and them being so cliquey — made me averse to a lot of this novel (yes, despite my theater background and despite this all being intentional writing). That said, I ended up loving the story of David and Sarah, which was incredibly relatable and nostalgic to many people's teen years of fumbling around and thinking everything is love. But the narrative flips failed to keep me engaged. The nonstop and "college essay"-esque explanations of words and their meanings, while likely laced with irony/purpose, irritated me. The first person to third person mid paragraph alternating threw me off even though it was intended to show the author/real person/meta-ness of the characters/their situations. The characters caring and remembering this much this long after high school was hard to believe, even for the sake of a meta book within a book type narrative. This book has many important things to say, especially comments on consent and assault and love and friendship, but it didn't hook me like I thought it would. It reminded me of Ponti, which I love and has many of the exact same themes, and which captivated me much more. ( )
  ostbying | Jan 1, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 77 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The reward of Trust Exercise is the way in which this novel asks to be read: not necessarily with suspicion, but with attention to the process of sorting significant from insignificant details; attention to what information you need in order to consider a certain version of the truth authoritative.
adicionada por ScattershotSteph | editarThe Nation, Erin Schwartz (Oct 2, 2019)
 
Perhaps the title itself is meant in an ironic sense but reading a novel is a sort of trust exercise in itself, the trust that the reader has in the writer to convince us that something that never happened actually did, and when our faith in the story is betrayed, the novel itself becomes damaged.
adicionada por ScattershotSteph | editarThe Irish Times, John Boyne (May 25, 2019)
 
Trust Exercise is marketed, accurately, as a #MeToo novel, and it shows with painful rawness how much damage can be wrought without anyone realising they are the victim. But this designation doesn’t capture the complexity of Choi’s investigation into human relations. What she’s done, magisterially, is to take the issues raised by #MeToo and show them as inextricable from more universal questions about taking a major role in someone else’s life, while knowing that we’re offering only a minor part in return.
 
The entire structure of the novel folds in on itself like a piece of origami, and what emerges is something sharp-edged and prickly: a narrative propelled by white-hot rage and the desire for revenge.
 
And so what we’re left with, in the end, is fragments of testimony, each colored by its own particular kind of trauma, its own distorted perspective. And yet it’s possible to see all these elements independently and take away some kind of abiding reality that supersedes them all.
 

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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Choi, SusanAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Seeback, NicoletteDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Neither can drive. David turns sixteen the following March, Sarah the following April.
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In 1982 in a southern city, David and Sarah, two freshmen at a highly competitive performing arts high school, thrive alongside their school peers in a rarified bubble, ambitiously devoting themselves to their studies--to music, to movement, to Shakespeare and, particularly, to classes taught by the magnetic acting teacher Mr. Kingsley. It is here in these halls that David and Sarah fall innocently and powerfully into first love. And also where, as this class of students rises through the ranks of high school, the outside world of family life and economic status, of academic pressure and the future, does not affect them--until it does--in a sudden spiral of events that brings a startling close to the first part of this novel.

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Média: (3.19)
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