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Disappearing Earth : a novel por Julia…
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Disappearing Earth : a novel (original 2019; edição 2019)

por Julia Phillips

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
8695118,928 (3.88)88
One of The New York Times 10 Best Books of the Year National Book Award Finalist Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize Finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize A Best Book of 2019: Entertainment Weekly, The Washington Post, NPR, Kirkus, AV Club, Vanity Fair, Variety, Esquire, Jezebel, Real Simple, The New York Post, Town & Country, Barnes & Noble, Library Journal, CBC, BookPage, BookBub, Book Riot, USA Today National Best Seller "Splendidly imagined . . . Thrilling" --Simon Winchester"A genuine masterpiece" --Gary Shteyngart Spellbinding, moving--evoking a fascinating region on the other side of the world--this suspenseful and haunting story announces the debut of a profoundly gifted writer. One August afternoon, on the shoreline of the Kamchatka peninsula at the northeastern edge of Russia, two girls--sisters, eight and eleven--go missing. In the ensuing weeks, then months, the police investigation turns up nothing. Echoes of the disappearance reverberate across a tightly woven community, with the fear and loss felt most deeply among its women. Taking us through a year in Kamchatka, Disappearing Earth enters with astonishing emotional acuity the worlds of a cast of richly drawn characters, all connected by the crime: a witness, a neighbor, a detective, a mother. We are transported to vistas of rugged beauty--densely wooded forests, open expanses of tundra, soaring volcanoes, and the glassy seas that border Japan and Alaska--and into a region as complex as it is alluring, where social and ethnic tensions have long simmered, and where outsiders are often the first to be accused. In a story as propulsive as it is emotionally engaging, and through a young writer's virtuosic feat of empathy and imagination, this powerful novel brings us to a new understanding of the intricate bonds of family and community, in a Russia unlike any we have seen before.… (mais)
Membro:wesmrlnd
Título:Disappearing Earth : a novel
Autores:Julia Phillips
Informação:New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2019.
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Fiction, NYT, NBAf, FLDf

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Disappearing Earth por Julia Phillips (2019)

Adicionado recentemente porjmcarlozzi, JBroda, karenob, Eliz12, PNWGirl, biblioteca privada, supahswank, MPerfetto, eshaundo, robertswa
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» Ver também 88 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 51 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Somehow reading two kidnapping books in a row, but both are excellent despite the subject matter (the other was Dear Miss Metropolitan). It's one of those novels that seem more like a collection of short stories that are connected by the people within those stories and things start to weave together (examples: 'A Visit from the Goon Squad' or 'The Czar of Love & Techno' among many). It seems many of these were published earlier as short stories and then some ending chapters were tacked on to tie everything together. Rather than the kidnappings, I think the more interesting part of the book is being about Kamchatka, Russia, a peninsula that largely was isolated up until fairly recently. Even more importantly, Kamchatka indigenous tribes and how they might be treated differently from the Russians who have moved to the peninsula. A sad correlation that also happens with the indigenous people in North America. The book was good, but it's hard to get attached to certain characters and then switch to others. ( )
  booklove2 | Sep 8, 2021 |
Seriously overrated. ( )
  zhoud2005 | Sep 8, 2021 |
The kidnapping of two young girls on the remote Kamchatka peninsula sets off a round of connected short stories and character studies that delve into the inner lives of Russian and indigenous women touched directly and tangentially by the abduction. The peninsula is not connected by road to the rest of Russia and the stories illuminate the remote, island-like nature of the region and its effect on its inhabitants. Thoroughly engaging. ( )
  villemezbrown | Jul 27, 2021 |
I failed this book a little and I would have been able to predict that if I had dug a little deeper before I started reading it. I am scrupulous about barely reading reviews before I read a book, I basically want to see if the reviewer liked it and hopefully get some idea of why but I jump out before any plot points or book organization is discussed. That is why I'm reading the book thank you very much. So I was a bit surprised when I saw in the opening information that many of the chapters had appeared in magazines, all different ones. As I read the book I realized why, it is really a collection of interconnected short stories. Each chapter is really a separate entity that works together by the end of the book. But this is a type of book that I seem ill equipped to experience in full. I found myself engrossed in each chapter but as I went on I totally forgot the details of previous ones. There are so many characters that I pushed out earlier ones and had to rack my brains to remember what Chegga did in his earlier appearances. Mea culpa. My brain is just too small to hold it all. I found myself using the x-ray feature in Kindle to jump back to the front where there was a LONG section laying out the characters. But that only got me "cousin of the person who did this one thing" it didn't give me the reminder of the full flavor of their character. Again, this is totally on me. I love getting into novels and really getting to know the characters and I missed that somewhere here. But even with that the stories are all fascinating, if individual, and I loved reading each one. The world is totally foreign to me and I always enjoy experiencing a culture totally separate from my life. I think I liked the way it wrapped up but I'm going to think about that for a while. This is truly a 5 star book given a 4 star read by your faithful correspondent. ( )
  MarkMad | Jul 14, 2021 |
Thankfully there was a list of major characters in the beginning of the book to refer back to, otherwise I would have given up after 50 pages. So many characters to keep track off it detracted from the story, which doesn't come together until the final two chapters (characters introduced and dropped until the end). The novel is mostly about young women making poor choices. More than half the men are ne'er-do-wells. There are a couple parts where you see the same character in another setting and from different people's perspectives, which can change or enhance your opinion of them. That was a good story device. Takes place in Kamchatka which is one of the more interesting aspects of this dark story. ( )
  SusanWallace | Jul 10, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 51 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
...the mystery (which turns out to have quite a few twists; it's worth reading until the very end) isn't everything, either. As Phillips has said in interviews, her book is a means of exploring the violence in women's lives, violence in many forms: The aforementioned widowing, which occurs when a man dies in a car accident on an icy road. Domestic violence in all its abusive forms. Abduction, rape, keeping secrets. As the many characters live through the calendar year, they appear in each others' stories, bit by bit. If you're paying attention, you may figure who took the girls.
 
There will be those eager to designate “Disappearing Earth” a thriller by focusing on the whodunit rather than what the tragedy reveals about the women in and around it. And if there is a single misstep in Phillips’s nearly flawless novel, it arrives with the tidy ending that seems to serve the needs of a genre rather than those of this particularly brilliant novel. But a tidy ending does not diminish Phillips’s deep examination of loss and longing, and it is a testament to the novel’s power that knowing what happened to the sisters remains very much beside the point.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarNew York Times, Ivy Pochoda (sítio Web pago) (May 14, 2019)
 
The ending of “Disappearing Earth” ignites an immediate desire to reread the chapters leading up to it: incidents and characters that seemed trivial acquire new meanings. The novel’s title comes from a scary story that Alyona tells her sister in the very first chapter, about a village on a bluff overlooking the ocean which is suddenly washed away by a tsunami. This story will be retold by the novel’s close, just as the novel will retell itself. What appears to be a collection of fragments, the remains of assorted personal disasters and the detritus of a lost empire, is in truth capable of unity. For the heirs of all that wreckage, discovering that they have the ability to achieve this unity—that they have had it all along—is the one great act of detection required of them.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarThe New Yorker, Laura Miller (May 13, 2019)
 
Storytelling is a major thread here, with the telling of stories starting and ending the book, and appearing throughout. Disappearing Earth is closer to a traditional novel than Elizabeth Strout’s Anything is Possible or Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, but its use of storytelling functions in much the same way, each chapter a story unto itself, the stories layered on top of those that came before, the threads and themes accruing as the book builds. The book never utilizes a point-of-view more than once. One of the downsides of this type of novel, of course, is that in not returning to characters and their particular stories, the reader may feel dissatisfied. In later stories, we catch glimpses or hear whispers of what’s happened to earlier characters, but there is a suspension here, a feeling of loss. This structure, though, nicely speaks to the loss of the girls, and allows that sense of incompletion to underscore the possibility that there may not be an ending at all, much less one that is fulfilling.
 
Storytelling is a major thread here, with the telling of stories starting and ending the book, and appearing throughout. Disappearing Earth is closer to a traditional novel than Elizabeth Strout’s Anything is Possible or Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, but its use of storytelling functions in much the same way, each chapter a story unto itself, the stories layered on top of those that came before, the threads and themes accruing as the book builds. The book never utilizes a point-of-view more than once. One of the downsides of this type of novel, of course, is that in not returning to characters and their particular stories, the reader may feel dissatisfied. In later stories, we catch glimpses or hear whispers of what’s happened to earlier characters, but there is a suspension here, a feeling of loss. This structure, though, nicely speaks to the loss of the girls, and allows that sense of incompletion to underscore the possibility that there may not be an ending at all, much less one that is fulfilling.
 
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One of The New York Times 10 Best Books of the Year National Book Award Finalist Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize Finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize A Best Book of 2019: Entertainment Weekly, The Washington Post, NPR, Kirkus, AV Club, Vanity Fair, Variety, Esquire, Jezebel, Real Simple, The New York Post, Town & Country, Barnes & Noble, Library Journal, CBC, BookPage, BookBub, Book Riot, USA Today National Best Seller "Splendidly imagined . . . Thrilling" --Simon Winchester"A genuine masterpiece" --Gary Shteyngart Spellbinding, moving--evoking a fascinating region on the other side of the world--this suspenseful and haunting story announces the debut of a profoundly gifted writer. One August afternoon, on the shoreline of the Kamchatka peninsula at the northeastern edge of Russia, two girls--sisters, eight and eleven--go missing. In the ensuing weeks, then months, the police investigation turns up nothing. Echoes of the disappearance reverberate across a tightly woven community, with the fear and loss felt most deeply among its women. Taking us through a year in Kamchatka, Disappearing Earth enters with astonishing emotional acuity the worlds of a cast of richly drawn characters, all connected by the crime: a witness, a neighbor, a detective, a mother. We are transported to vistas of rugged beauty--densely wooded forests, open expanses of tundra, soaring volcanoes, and the glassy seas that border Japan and Alaska--and into a region as complex as it is alluring, where social and ethnic tensions have long simmered, and where outsiders are often the first to be accused. In a story as propulsive as it is emotionally engaging, and through a young writer's virtuosic feat of empathy and imagination, this powerful novel brings us to a new understanding of the intricate bonds of family and community, in a Russia unlike any we have seen before.

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