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Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back…
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Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language (edição 2020)

por Amanda Montell (Autor)

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1435153,077 (4.23)4
A brash, enlightening, and wildly entertaining feminist look at gendered language and the way it shapes us, written with humor and playfulness that challenges words and phrases and how we use them. "I get so jazzed about the future of feminism knowing that Amanda Montell's brilliance is rising up and about to explode worldwide."--Jill Soloway The word bitch conjures many images for many people, but it is most often meant to describe an unpleasant woman. Even before its usage to mean a female canine, bitch didn't refer to gender at all--it originated as a gender-neutral word meaning genitalia. A perfectly innocuous word devolving into a female insult is the case for tons more terms, including hussy--which simply meant housewife--or slut, which meant an untidy person and was also used to describe men. These words are just a few among history's many English slurs hurled at women. Amanda Montell, reporter and feminist linguist, deconstructs language--from insults and cursing, gossip, and catcalling to grammar and pronunciation patterns--to reveal the ways it has been used for centuries to keep women and other marginalized genders from power. Ever wonder why so many people are annoyed when women talk with vocal fry or use the word like as a filler? Or why certain gender-neutral terms stick and others don't? Or where stereotypes of how women and men speak come from in the first place? Montell effortlessly moves between history, science, and popular culture to explore these questions and more--and how we can use the answers to effect real social change. Montell's irresistible humor shines through, making linguistics not only approachable but both downright hilarious and profound, demonstrated in chapters such as: Slutty Skanks and Nasty Dykes: A Comprehensive List of Gendered Insults How to Embarrass the Shit Out of People Who Try to Correct Your Grammar Fuck it: An Ode to Cursing While Female Cyclops, Panty Puppet, Bald Headed Bastard and 100+ Other Things to Call Your Genitalia Montell effortlessly moves between history and popular culture to explore these questions and more. Wordslut gets to the heart of our language, marvels at its elasticity, and sheds much-needed light into the biases that shadow women in our culture and our consciousness.… (mais)
Membro:CSUDHWRC
Título:Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language
Autores:Amanda Montell (Autor)
Informação:Harper Wave (2020), Edition: Reprint, 304 pages
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Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language por Amanda Montell

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Mostrando 5 de 5
A very fun and insightful read.

It was also very interesting to juxtapose what Montell is saying here about the English language with my own knowledge of other languages. To no one’s surprise, a lot of gender biases and sexist curse words in every one of them…

But as much as it’s a bummer to read about linguistic oppression of marginalized groups, this book also never forgets to remind you that these said groups are often the very engine that moves the language forward, often revolutionizing the ways in which we communicate.

Really enjoyed this one. ( )
  tetiana.90 | Sep 28, 2021 |
太爽了!現在再看到貶損 vocal fry、Valley girl accent 乃至女性說粗口的發言會下意識皺一下眉頭,但願有一天親身遇上也能迅速組織好語言像作者那樣有力地反駁。語言影響甚至決定了思想,因此對貶損女性的髒話重新定義很重要,消除特定詞彙中的性別暗示很重要,總而言之——奪回話語權很重要,“what we can do is keep on fighting for feminism in general and refuse to be silenced”

看討論單詞陰陽性時不由得反思一下中文,中文雖然沒有詞性但卻有部首,一邊是嫉妒奸佞這類貶義詞,一邊是娉婷裊娜姣好這類限定了所謂「女性氣質」的褒義詞,照樣透著千年儒家沉澱 patriarchy 的腐臭。不過中文網絡上很多建言還停留在歐美上世紀七十年代的第二波女權運動的範疇之內,相形之下不免有點不甘心

然後看到書中最後一段採訪是在2017年加州山火期間,作者寫 one of the largest in modern California history,真的不由得蹦出了一句 Just you wait(。正好這兩天加州漫天昏黃猶如銀翼殺手2049,也太巧了!!! ( )
  puripuri | Sep 9, 2021 |
Really fascinating and fun book, and I enjoyed listening to the author reading it too (as it seemed like she was also having fun). It presented a great history on gendered language and how we use it along with a lot more. Being the massive potty mouth that I am, I loved the chapter on swearing. ( )
  spinsterrevival | Jun 19, 2020 |
Amanda Montell explores studies in sociolinguistics that explore how the very language we use supports the default system of patriarchy and how as everyday users we can try to be more proactive in how we use English as feminists.

I adored this book from the opening introduction. While the linguistics studies Montell is unpacking are rigorous and academic, she makes them clear and understandable for a general audience while being smart and funny and entertaining. Whether she's exploring the swears we use, the euphemisms we use for genitalia, or how women talk amongst themselves, everything is well explored and clear for the non-expert. Highly recommended for all feminists but also for those who are just curious about how English really works. ( )
  MickyFine | Nov 12, 2019 |
Brilliant, necessary, and funny besides, this book covers gendered insults, gender itself, how language changes and evolves (and who helps that along - namely, women and minorities), catcalling, gay culture and language, nicknames for genitalia, and an entire chapter on cursing. Highly recommended for everyone.

Quotes

Context will typically reveal if a term is being used in an objectifying way or a courteous one. (in a footnote on p. 35)

"The more one talks and the less one listens, the more likely it is that one's viewpoint will function as if it were community consensus even if it is not....
The more attention one pays to perspectives different from one's own, the more likely one is to give tacit - indeed sometimes unwitting - support to these other views simply by being able to understand them." Thus, women's experiences wind up getting squashed under their own generosity as listeners. (Sally McConnell-Ginet, Cornell University linguist, 36-37)

The purpose of name-calling is to accuse a person of not behaving as they should in the eyes of the speaker. (Chi Luu, JSTOR, 37)

If gender isn't something that comes fully formed at birth, where exactly do each of our genders come from then? This might not seem like a language question, but some philosophers theorize that gender is actually constructed through language itself....Language brings gender to life. (65)

[UK linguist Jennifer Coates examined speech styles of all-women and all-men groups - genderlects - and observed that] while men's speech styles can be categorized as "competitive," women's is "cooperative." [Vertical, hierarchical structure vs. horizontal, supportive structure] (84)

"Language is not always about making an argument or conveying information in the cleanest, simplest way possible. It's often about building relationships. It's about making yourself understood and trying to understand someone else." (Journalist Ann Friedman, 93)

...from early childhood, women and men are socialized to live in two opposing cultures with two opposing sets of values, so they grow up to understand things differently. Not better or worse, just different. As a result, men's goals when they talk are to communicate information, while women's are to form connections. (Deborah Tannen, You Just Don't Understand, 1990, p. 100)

...judgments about linguistic prestige depend a whole lot on how we feel about the speaker....People don't seem to care or even notice when men talk this way [uptalk, vocal fry, hedging]. Only when it comes from female mouths does it cause such an upset. (127)

"You can wonder why it is that the language of a powerless group gets taken up later by the majority - but perhaps it has always been the powerless who use language as a form of power." (Louise Vasvari, 131)

There is a simple way we can be part of the shift toward a less judgmental linguistic future: instead of acting crotchety and pedantic toward new language trends, we can feel curious and fascinated by them. (132)

One of our culture's least helpful pieces of advice is that women need to change the way they speak to sound less "like women" (or that queer people need to sound straighter, or that people of color need to sound whiter). The way any of these folks talk isn't inherently more or less worthy of respect. It only sounds that way because it reflects an underlying assumption about who holds more power in our culture. (133)

"The power of sexuality is asymmetrical, in part, because being seen as sexual has different consequences for women and men." (Beth A. Quinn, 183)

There is one unified reason why many men feel as though they have an inherent right to comment on women's bodies, ignore them in meetings, or dismiss them with the excuse that they're on their periods and acting hysterical: it's because of a lack of empathy. (183)

The way to get to that world starts not with teaching women how to protect themselves from harm but with teaching men, ideally from very early on, that the whole world does not belong to them. (188)

Sapir-Whorf hypothesis: language influences thought; language determines thought (277)

...women (or any oppressed group) can come up with new words to express what were once unnamed experiences, but sometimes the backlash is louder than the progress. (re: "mansplaining" 285) ( )
  JennyArch | Jun 8, 2019 |
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A brash, enlightening, and wildly entertaining feminist look at gendered language and the way it shapes us, written with humor and playfulness that challenges words and phrases and how we use them. "I get so jazzed about the future of feminism knowing that Amanda Montell's brilliance is rising up and about to explode worldwide."--Jill Soloway The word bitch conjures many images for many people, but it is most often meant to describe an unpleasant woman. Even before its usage to mean a female canine, bitch didn't refer to gender at all--it originated as a gender-neutral word meaning genitalia. A perfectly innocuous word devolving into a female insult is the case for tons more terms, including hussy--which simply meant housewife--or slut, which meant an untidy person and was also used to describe men. These words are just a few among history's many English slurs hurled at women. Amanda Montell, reporter and feminist linguist, deconstructs language--from insults and cursing, gossip, and catcalling to grammar and pronunciation patterns--to reveal the ways it has been used for centuries to keep women and other marginalized genders from power. Ever wonder why so many people are annoyed when women talk with vocal fry or use the word like as a filler? Or why certain gender-neutral terms stick and others don't? Or where stereotypes of how women and men speak come from in the first place? Montell effortlessly moves between history, science, and popular culture to explore these questions and more--and how we can use the answers to effect real social change. Montell's irresistible humor shines through, making linguistics not only approachable but both downright hilarious and profound, demonstrated in chapters such as: Slutty Skanks and Nasty Dykes: A Comprehensive List of Gendered Insults How to Embarrass the Shit Out of People Who Try to Correct Your Grammar Fuck it: An Ode to Cursing While Female Cyclops, Panty Puppet, Bald Headed Bastard and 100+ Other Things to Call Your Genitalia Montell effortlessly moves between history and popular culture to explore these questions and more. Wordslut gets to the heart of our language, marvels at its elasticity, and sheds much-needed light into the biases that shadow women in our culture and our consciousness.

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