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American Gods: A Novel por Neil Gaiman
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American Gods: A Novel (original 2001; edição 2021)

por Neil Gaiman (Autor)

Séries: American Gods (1)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
30,40783069 (4.07)12 / 1454
Shadow is a man with a past. But now he wants nothing more than to live a quiet life with his wife and stay out of trouble. Until he learns that she's been killed in a terrible accident. Flying home for the funeral, as a violent storm rocks the plane, a strange man in the seat next to him introduces himself. The man calls himself Mr. Wednesday, and he knows more about Shadow than is possible. He warns Shadow that a far bigger storm is coming. And from that moment on, nothing will ever he the same.… (mais)
Membro:cryforjudas
Título:American Gods: A Novel
Autores:Neil Gaiman (Autor)
Informação:William Morrow Paperbacks (2021), Edition: Annotated, 560 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:unread

Pormenores da obra

American Gods por Neil Gaiman (2001)

Adicionado recentemente porHolly.Pierette, MCBacon, dionnedock, gnesom, goobertellii, Rennie80, biblioteca privada, matildasdaddy
  1. 260
    Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders por Neil Gaiman (Utilizador anónimo, moonstormer)
    Utilizador anónimo: It's a great collection all around but the kicker is this collection includes a novella about Shadow a couple years after the events of American Gods
    moonstormer: Fragile Things contains a short story with the same character as is in American Gods. Both are highly recommended.
  2. 252
    Neverwhere por Neil Gaiman (WilliamPascoe)
    WilliamPascoe: Phenominally brilliant fantasy .
  3. 232
    Anansi Boys por Neil Gaiman (infiniteletters)
  4. 100
    Fables, Vol. 01: Legends in Exile por Bill Willingham (sbuehrle)
  5. 111
    Night Watch por Sergei Lukyanenko (citygirl)
    citygirl: When the supernatural collides with modern life. One in Moscow, one in the US.
  6. 177
    Small Gods por Terry Pratchett (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the necessity of belief.
  7. 102
    The Master and Margarita por Mikhail Bulgakov (klarusu)
    klarusu: The same sense of unreality layered over a real-world setting, the same undercurrent of humour but this time it's the Devil that lands in Moscow
  8. 81
    Last Call por Tim Powers (grizzly.anderson, MyriadBooks)
    grizzly.anderson: Both are about old world gods making their place in the new world.
    MyriadBooks: For aspiring to win in a bargain with gods.
  9. 94
    The Stand {1978} por Stephen King (clif_hiker)
  10. 72
    Un Lun Dun por China Miéville (bertyboy)
    bertyboy: Alternative London for alternative fantasy. Have a go!
  11. 61
    King Rat por China Miéville (Runkst)
  12. 117
    The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul por Douglas Adams (WoodsieGirl)
  13. 62
    Eight Days of Luke por Diana Wynne Jones (guyalice)
    guyalice: Neil Gaiman was surprised to discover that the concept of Eight Days of Luke was very similar to what he had initially planned for the plot of American Gods. He dropped the day-theme to avoid too many similarities and gave props to Wynne Jones.
  14. 40
    The Wood Wife por Terri Windling (Larkken)
  15. 30
    Someplace to be Flying por Charles de Lint (MyriadBooks)
  16. 52
    Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal por Christopher Moore (andomck)
    andomck: Religion, realism, fantasy, humor, low brow, etc. Makes sense to me.
  17. 30
    The Bone Clocks por David Mitchell (sturlington)
    sturlington: The Bone Clocks reminded me strongly of Neil Gaiman and David Mitchell has said that Gaiman was an influence.
  18. 30
    Angelmaker por Nick Harkaway (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  19. 41
    Rivers of London por Ben Aaronovitch (Chricke)
  20. 52
    The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America por Bill Bryson (rockhopper_penguin)
    rockhopper_penguin: I read these two books one after another. It wasn't a deliberate decision, but the two did seem to work well together. The books visit a few of the same places, and it's interesting to note how differently they are portrayed in each.

(ver todas as 46 recomendações)

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Inglês (807)  Espanhol (4)  Alemão (4)  Holandês (3)  Italiano (2)  Francês (2)  Finlandês (2)  Português (1)  Português (Brasil) (1)  Sueco (1)  Norueguês (1)  Catalão (1)  Todas as línguas (829)
Mostrando 1-5 de 829 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This book was a kind of a disappointment to me, meaning, it was not as good as I thought it was. For many years I've heard wonders about this book and how it was amazing. It was on my "to-read" for at least a couple of years and I purchased because of a Kindle deal, and last month I decided to give it a try.

Well, I think the book starts pretty well, telling us about the situation of Shadow, his time in jail and how he is mysteriously released from prison one day earlier than expected. I enjoyed that first part of the book up until how Shadow met Wednesday. Then, many parallel stories start to come up in the middle of the narrative, Shadow's errands becomes uninteresting, and for me the road trip became quite boring from the middle of the book forward.

There are many references of American culture, religion, ancient and modern mythology from around the globe, which is inherently interesting, but the way all these elements were put together in the story didn't work very well, in my opinion.

I read the 2011 version (tenth anniversary edition), that one with additional 12,000 words, and maybe that was one of the reasons I thought there were whole chapters of the book that seemed not be essential to the story. So the rhythm of the story is irregular, there were great chapters and then a couple ones that simply dragged and I couldn't wait for the narrative to get back on track.

All in all, the premise of the book is great, I enjoyed the "weird fantasy" aspect of the story, but for me it was not executed very well. ( )
  noisydeadlines | Jul 30, 2021 |
I really liked this story, but had trouble feeling any kind of connection with the characters, the protagonist especially. Admittedly, I often find this with Gaiman's characters; it's almost as if they are distant by design, but I haven't quite determined the reasoning behind their lack of passion. I would otherwise rank this among my favourites, and I will probably read this again (though it isn't my habit to re-read material) to pick up the many breadcrumbs I will have no doubt missed in my first reading. ( )
  dowswell | Jul 25, 2021 |
I thought I already marked this one as Read?

This whole book is like waiting for something to happen, while nothing is actually happening and the thing you are waiting for SPOILERS BELOW




.....doesnt actually happen at all in the end. Which is the twist. Reminds me of the same ending of a different book he wrote. ( )
  Joy_Bush | Jul 22, 2021 |
It was okay

The whole book I feel like nothing is happening, just preparing for something to happen and a whole big lead up to a big battle that was supposed to happen and

Spoilers ahead!
.
.
.
.
.


The battle didnt happen at all, which I should have known because thats the same thing that happened in Good Omens.
I started watching the show, the first 3 episodes which makes the story a lot more alive then it was in the book.

Im convinced that Neil Gaiman is a great writer but hes in the wrong medium. I dont seem to be enjoying his books but all his stories translate very well to the screen, TV, movies.
His 2 Doctor Who episodes are my favorite!

( )
  Joy_Bush | Jul 22, 2021 |
American Gods falls on the unfortunately long list of books that I wish were better. It won (or was at least nominated) for a whole pile of awards[1]. It's by an author who's works in other genres I've enjoyed (e.g. the movie Corline or his episodes on Doctor Who) and who seems like a solid person in real life.

I just couldn't get into it.

It's a bummer, because it's such a fascinating world. I like the idea (shared by The Iron Druid Chronicles) that not only are the gods still walking among us, but also that a god can have more than one form, depending on how and when it was worshipped. I like the idea that the old gods are pissed at the new gods (Media / The Internet) for encroaching on their territory. I like how the old gods feel more 'human', only somehow more yet also somehow less.

But the story itself drags at points, with several sections (the dreams in particular) which I thought were interesting, but I wasn't entirely sure why they were there. I've heard it said that Gaiman cut half of American Gods even before it was released, but at ~650 pages, it's still a hefty tome. I think it could have lost a little more.

Conversely, I did think that most of the characters were pretty solid. I thought Shadow was a solid enough protagonist, going along with a world gone mad until he'd had enough... and then a step or two more. I felt for Mr. Wednesday, trying to take back pieces of a world gone wrong. I liked the little hints and pieces of how the gods' lives had changed on coming to the new world.

All in all, it's the sort of book that I'm glad that I've read... but I doubt I will ever reread. There are a few interesting ideas buried in there that I'm sure will surface years from now, long after I've forgotten where they came from.

[1] Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel (2001), Hugo Award for Best Novel (2002), Nebula Award for Best Novel (2002), Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel (2002), International Horror Guild Award Nominee for Best Novel (2001), etc, see Goodreads ( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 829 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This is a fantastic novel, as obsessed with the minutiae of life on the road as it is with a catalogue of doomed and half-forgotten deities. In the course of the protagonist Shadow's adventures as the bodyguard and fixer of the one-eyed Mr Wednesday, he visits a famous museum of junk and the motel at the centre of the US, as well as eating more sorts of good and bad diner food than one wants especially to think about.
adicionada por mikeg2 | editarThe Independent, Roz Kaveney (Jul 18, 2001)
 
Part of the joy of American Gods is that its inventions all find a place in a well-organised structure. The book runs as precisely as clockwork, but reads as smoothly as silk or warm chocolate.
adicionada por stephmo | editarThe Independent, Roz Kaveney (Jul 18, 2001)
 
Gaiman's stories are always overstuffed experiences, and ''American Gods'' has more than enough to earn its redemption, including a hero who deserves further adventures.
adicionada por stephmo | editarEntertainment Weekly, Jeff Jensen (Jul 11, 2001)
 
"American Gods" is a juicily original melding of archaic myth with the slangy, gritty, melancholy voice of one of America's great cultural inventions -- the hard-boiled detective; call it Wagnerian noir. The melting pot has produced stranger cocktails, but few that are as tasty.
adicionada por stephmo | editarSalon.com, Laura Miller (Jun 22, 2001)
 
Sadly, American Gods promises more than it delivers. The premise is brilliant; the execution is vague, pedestrian and deeply disappointing. It's not bad, but it's not nearly as good as it could be. There are wonderful moments, but they are few and far between. This should be a massive, complex story, a clash of the old world and the new, a real opportunity to examine what drives America and what it lacks. Instead, it is an enjoyable stroll across a big country, populated by an entertaining sequence of "spot the god" contests.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (17 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Gaiman, Neilautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Boutsikaris, DennisNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Guidall, GeorgeNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jones, SarahNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kivimäki, MikaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
McKean, DaveIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
McLarty, RonNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Oreskes, DanielNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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One question that has always intrigued me is what happens to demonic beings when immigrants move from their homelands. Irish-Americans remember the fairies, Norwegian-Americans the nisser, Greek-Americans the vryókolas, but only in relation to events remembered in the Old Country. When I once asked why such demons were not seen in America, my informants giggled confusedly and said, "They're scared to pass the ocean, it's too far," pointing out that Christ and the apostles never came to America.

—Richard Dorson, "A Theory For American Folklore,"
                           American Folklore and the Historian
                           (University of Chicago Press, 1971)
CHAPTER ONE
The boundaries of our country sir? Why sir, on the north we are bounded by the Aurora Borealis, on the east we are bounded by the rising sun, on the south we are bounded by the procession of the Equinoxes, and on the west by the Day of Judgement
—The American Joe Miller's Jest Book
CHAPTER TWO
They took her to the cemet'ry
In a big ol' cadillac
They took her to the cemet'ry
But they did not bring her back.
—old song
Dedicatória
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For absent friends—Kathy Acker and Roger Zelazny,
                   and all points between
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Shadow had done three years in prison.
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Fiction allows us to slide into these other heads, these other places, and look out through other eyes. And then in the tale we stop before we die, or we die vicariously and unharmed, and in the world beyond the tale we turn the page or close the book, and we resume our lives.
"A town isn't a town without a bookstore. It may call itself a town, but without a bookstore it knows it's not fooling a soul."
When people came to America they brought us with them. They brought me, and Loki, and Thor, Anansi and the Lion-God, Leprechauns and Kobalds and Banshees, Kubera and Frau Holle and Ashtaroth, and they brought you. We rode here in their minds, and we took root. We travelled with the settlers to the new lands across the ocean.
The land is vast. Soon enough, our people abandoned us, remembered us only as creatures of the old land, as things that had not come with them to the new. Our true believers passed on, or stopped believing, and we were left, lost and scared and dispossessed, only what little smidgens of worship or belief we could find. And to get by as best we could.
'So that's what we've done, gotten by, out on the edges of things, where no-one was watching us too closely.'
Gods die. And when they truly die they are unmourned and unremembered. Ideas are more difficult to kill than people, but they can be killed, in the end.
All we have to believe with is our senses, the tools we use to perceive the world: our sight, our touch, our memory. If they lie to us, then nothing can be trusted. And even if we do not believe, then still we cannot travel in any other way than the road our senses show us; and we must walk that road to the end.
There's never been a true war that wasn't fought between two sets of people who were certain they were in the right. The really dangerous people believe they are doing whatever they are doing solely and only because it is without question the right thing to do. And that is what makes them dangerous.
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There are at least two different editions of this book.   The original was published in 2001, and the tenth anniversary edition (Author's preferred text)  was published in 2011.   Please do not combine.
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Shadow is a man with a past. But now he wants nothing more than to live a quiet life with his wife and stay out of trouble. Until he learns that she's been killed in a terrible accident. Flying home for the funeral, as a violent storm rocks the plane, a strange man in the seat next to him introduces himself. The man calls himself Mr. Wednesday, and he knows more about Shadow than is possible. He warns Shadow that a far bigger storm is coming. And from that moment on, nothing will ever he the same.

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