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Into the Planet: My Life as a Cave Diver por…
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Into the Planet: My Life as a Cave Diver (edição 2020)

por Jill Heinerth (Autor)

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1046205,693 (3.52)1
"From one of the world's most renowned cave divers, a firsthand account of exploring the earth's final frontier: the hidden depths of our oceans and the sunken caves inside our planet. More people have died exploring underwater caves than climbing Mount Everest, and we know more about deep space than we do about the depths of our oceans. From one of the top cave divers working today--and one of the very few women in her field--Into the Planet blends science, adventure, and memoir to bring readers face-to-face with the terror and beauty of earth's remaining unknowns and the extremes of human capability. Jill Heinerth--the first person in history to dive deep into an Antarctic iceberg and leader of a team that discovered the ancient watery remains of Mayan civilizations--has descended farther into the inner depths of our planet than any other woman. She takes us into the harrowing split-second decisions that determine whether a diver makes it back to safety, the prejudices that prevent women from pursuing careers underwater, and her endeavor to recover a fallen friend's body from the confines of a cave. But there's beauty beyond the danger of diving, and while Heinerth swims beneath our feet in the lifeblood of our planet, she works with biologists discovering new species, physicists tracking climate change, and hydrogeologists examining our finite freshwater reserves. Written with hair-raising intensity, Into the Planet is the first book to deliver an intimate account of cave diving, transporting readers deep into inner space, where fear must be reconciled and a mission's success balances between knowing one's limits and pushing the envelope of human endurance." --Amazon.… (mais)
Membro:raindancemary
Título:Into the Planet: My Life as a Cave Diver
Autores:Jill Heinerth (Autor)
Informação:Ecco (2020), Edition: Reprint, 288 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:nonfiction, outdoors, bethlehem library, ex library, 2021

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Into the Planet: My Life as a Cave Diver por Jill Heinerth

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I was disappointed. I had hoped this would be more like Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson. This was more Jill's story as indicated by the subtitle. I found it a bit melodramatic. The pacing wasn't quite right for the suspense she was trying to create. We thought too much emphasis on her love life. In fact so much repetition of the problems of her first marriage that my husband and I began to roll our eyes each time the subject came up. The topic is interesting to me, but this just didn't quite do for us. ( )
  njcur | Jan 2, 2021 |
This is a memoir of a cave diver, a person who explores underwater caves and passages beneath the earth and in icebergs. It's an incredibly dangerous and risky vocation, and I could almost feel the suffocating fear at some of the predicaments that the author got herself into. It would take a very special kind of personality to engage in activities like this, as your life is in danger virtually every time you embark on a mission. Pretty fascinating. ( )
  flourgirl49 | Nov 26, 2020 |
Diver Jill Heinerth recounts her experiences from getting into diving as a young marketing executive to leading the first diving expedition below icebergs in Antarctica. Her excitement for diving is really clear; her descriptions of the landscapes and views she experiences while diving are incredible, and she also makes the logistics of diving quite accessible to readers. She also comments on her life more broadly and how diving has intertwined with her sense of being, from her marriage to her status as one of only a few professional women in diving.

I first learned about this book a while ago, I believe after reading the magnificent Deep a few years ago. I'm very happy that I finally got around to reading it, and I thought it was a fascinating look into another extreme sport that I have very little desire to actually do but that is from a somewhat distant vantage really fascinating. ( )
  forsanolim | Jun 12, 2020 |
Overall, a good read and included some gorgeous photography, although I wished the book had focused more on cave diving and less on the author's relationship issues.

I was glad to see I'm not the only one calling out how little we know about Earth compared to outer space: "Surprisingly, we know more about outer space than inner earth, and this is a problem." (Page 5). And I'm beginning to wonder about the fate of a species that is obviously willing to invest far more in outer space than in its home planet.

This also unexpectedly intersected with [b:The Orchid Thief: A True Story of Beauty and Obsession|228345|The Orchid Thief A True Story of Beauty and Obsession|Susan Orlean|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1328347217l/228345._SY75_.jpg|911511] when it discussed the ghost orchid in the Fakahatchee strand. Jill Heinerth was on a team of divers filming a movie about the movement of water through Florida, and as part of it, they visited the Fakahatchee strand. I found this discussion of the orchid and its pollinating moth especially interesting:

“The orchid’s tangled web of tubular roots clings to the bark of swampy vegetation, but can thrive only in the presence of a rare and unique fungus. Filtered sunlight activates the air root growth year-round, but the plant will only bloom in a nearly miraculous combination of events. For less than three weeks during peak mosquito season, if all goes according to plan, the giant sphinx moth will hover admiringly at the beautiful bloom, then unfurl its ten-inch-long proboscis and slap its tongue deep into the spur of the orchid. No other insect can reach the sweet and tempting nectar, yet somehow in the Fakahatchee, the hummingbird-sized giant sphinx had managed this year to pollinate seven blooms.” (Page 240).

I wonder how many people who want the ghost orchid understand about the fungus. Because without the fungus, the whole scheme described in [b:The Orchid Thief: A True Story of Beauty and Obsession|228345|The Orchid Thief A True Story of Beauty and Obsession|Susan Orlean|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1328347217l/228345._SY75_.jpg|911511] would have crashed and burned. ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
I expected much more. This is mostly about Heinerth's experiences on other people's cave diving expeditions, especially Bill Stone's projects. Bill Stone has an excellent book himself, "Beyond the Deep: Deadly Descent into the World's Most Treacherous Cave," so I don't see a reason for reading this one.

Beyond that, the writing is very average. There is way too much information about her relationships. I didn't expect to be reading about her frustrations with online dating, and swiping right or left. It is neither interesting nor novel.

I don't know if she has repressed impostor syndrome, but she is constantly pointing out what an amazing explorer she is.

> We were on top of the world, and I was comfortable in my role as an exploration diver and felt I was an important asset to the success of the entire team.

> In this wild and almost unimaginable situation, I continue to blossom in the purity of unhindered exploration. I’ll be afraid, but I’ll never concede.

Stone didn't constantly write how great he is. He didn't have to, because his stories stood for themselves.

She complains constantly, about everything from bugs to her husband to online trolls. I'm sympathetic to her about trolls, but don't think that either engaging with them or complaining about it in your memoir is at all productive. And she unfortunately undercuts herself; on one page she complains about others saying saying she didn't earn her way onto her husband's expedition, and on the next page she writes:

> Not yet envisioning myself as capable of that level of advanced technical exploration diving, I first settled into a management and marketing role, bringing my artistic skills, photography, and technical background to the group.

There are a few interesting stories here, but they are buried in a mess.

> I was still too exhausted to communicate with Paul, who was sitting only five yards away at the fire. I wished he would sweep me up and make it all go away. Was our bond so weak that he could not even ask me what was wrong? … I wanted my indomitable French-Canadian husband to sweep me into his arms and make everything better. ( )
  breic | Sep 6, 2019 |
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"From one of the world's most renowned cave divers, a firsthand account of exploring the earth's final frontier: the hidden depths of our oceans and the sunken caves inside our planet. More people have died exploring underwater caves than climbing Mount Everest, and we know more about deep space than we do about the depths of our oceans. From one of the top cave divers working today--and one of the very few women in her field--Into the Planet blends science, adventure, and memoir to bring readers face-to-face with the terror and beauty of earth's remaining unknowns and the extremes of human capability. Jill Heinerth--the first person in history to dive deep into an Antarctic iceberg and leader of a team that discovered the ancient watery remains of Mayan civilizations--has descended farther into the inner depths of our planet than any other woman. She takes us into the harrowing split-second decisions that determine whether a diver makes it back to safety, the prejudices that prevent women from pursuing careers underwater, and her endeavor to recover a fallen friend's body from the confines of a cave. But there's beauty beyond the danger of diving, and while Heinerth swims beneath our feet in the lifeblood of our planet, she works with biologists discovering new species, physicists tracking climate change, and hydrogeologists examining our finite freshwater reserves. Written with hair-raising intensity, Into the Planet is the first book to deliver an intimate account of cave diving, transporting readers deep into inner space, where fear must be reconciled and a mission's success balances between knowing one's limits and pushing the envelope of human endurance." --Amazon.

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