Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins…
A carregar...

Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia (edição 2019)

por Sabrina Strings (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
292692,260 (3.92)2
How the female body has been racialized for over two hundred years There is an obesity epidemic in this country and poor black women are particularly stigmatized as "diseased" and a burden on the public health care system. This is only the most recent incarnation of the fear of fat black women, which Sabrina Strings shows took root more than two hundred years ago. Strings weaves together an eye-opening historical narrative ranging from the Renaissance to the current moment, analyzing important works of art, newspaper and magazine articles, and scientific literature and medical journals-where fat bodies were once praised-showing that fat phobia, as it relates to black women, did not originate with medical findings, but with the Enlightenment era belief that fatness was evidence of "savagery" and racial inferiority. The author argues that the contemporary ideal of slenderness is, at its very core, racialized and racist. Indeed, it was not until the early twentieth century, when racialized attitudes against fatness were already entrenched in the culture, that the medical establishment began its crusade against obesity. An important and original work, Fearing the Black Body argues convincingly that fat phobia isn't about health at all, but rather a means of using the body to validate race, class, and gender prejudice.… (mais)
Membro:rcarp55
Título:Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia
Autores:Sabrina Strings (Autor)
Informação:NYU Press (2019), Edition: First Edition, 296 pages
Coleções:A sua biblioteca, Para ler
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia por Sabrina Strings

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 2 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This was an interesting one. Excellently written, very good material, but at the end I felt it was lacking - or that I wanted it to be something other than what it was.

This is not a 101 level book, or probably even 201. The focus is on how beauty and cultural standards and expectations evolved regarding weight, and the information is pulled from primary sources. Primary sources only give us what data is available and what people chose to write and say. They don't provide analysis on what it means that that's what they chose to say or not say. The focus is on white women because that's who was considered worth writing about; we don't have a time machine to go back and yell at the people writing to be more inclusive. So reading what isn't written, reading for exclusion, all of these things become essential.

This is not a popular science or sociology book that will then tell you exactly what that primary source information means and why. The reader is going to have to have the requisite cultural knowledge to understand how systems of oppression work and make those leaps themself. This book is going to be (has already been and will continue to be) cited from here to breakfast by those works of analysis and synthesis. This is not a failing of this book, but it might be a failing of the title.

I found this book incredibly fascinating, very enlightening, wildly infuriating, and mostly useful at filling in the historical record of how female bodies were commodified in Western Europe and then the USA over the centuries. I found the critique of "healthy" bodies being required for the state and how that is an essential part of fascism a good refresher and a good intersection with disability writing and politics.

A very good read. Just know what it is you're reading. ( )
  g33kgrrl | Jul 13, 2024 |
An interesting read. The final chapter and epilogue were particularly enlightening. ( )
  LaPhenix | Jul 8, 2024 |
Absolutely necessary read at multiple intersections of fields of study and practice.

Personal trainers, nutritionists, feminists, humanists, biologists, sociologists, anthropologists, art historians, food historians (or just historians really), African American culture researchers, LGBTQ 'allies', all American political affiliations--- anyone who ever and will ever interact with someone who's skin has high melanin content, including those with high melanin content.

Any who want to be more aware of how they may subconsciously be demeaning, judging, or othering certain bodies needs to read this. ( )
  LouLTE | Oct 7, 2023 |
History of Western ideas about beauty and about race, arguing that their interaction ultimately produced fatphobia, which serves both to “degrade black women and discipline white women.” Slavery produced a need for racial hierarchy, which led white Europeans to link fatness to “greedy” Black people, while religious concepts “suggested that overeating was ungodly.” Only after these developments did fatness become medicalized. This narrative may help to explain why the US was the primary source of fear of fat/valorizing thinness. One interesting bit: Strings argues that fatness was condemned in white men before it was condemned in white women, because men were supposed to be more self-controlled/rational. Also, she argues that racial classification systems often focused intensely on putative differences in women, because concerns about feminine aesthetics were always central to race-making projects. ( )
1 vote rivkat | May 15, 2023 |
This sociological history uncovers a rich amount of evidence to show that people have been saying shitty things about Black/fat/female people (woe betide you if you fit all three categories!) for hundreds of years. It is amazing and ultimately depressing that the slurs we hear today have been perpetuated, and accepted, for generations. The author does a fine job explaining how White Christian Americans tried to justify their own exceptionalism through fat phobia, entwined with racism and misogyny. Another interesting (read: horrifying) theme of this book is the long history of men objectifying women by defining "beauty" in regards to the female body. Often these opinions about beauty served to reinforce dominant social values, but I suspect that sometimes the men who devised these theories did so also to justify their own sexual preferences. Recommended for all readers. ( )
1 vote librarianarpita | Dec 4, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

How the female body has been racialized for over two hundred years There is an obesity epidemic in this country and poor black women are particularly stigmatized as "diseased" and a burden on the public health care system. This is only the most recent incarnation of the fear of fat black women, which Sabrina Strings shows took root more than two hundred years ago. Strings weaves together an eye-opening historical narrative ranging from the Renaissance to the current moment, analyzing important works of art, newspaper and magazine articles, and scientific literature and medical journals-where fat bodies were once praised-showing that fat phobia, as it relates to black women, did not originate with medical findings, but with the Enlightenment era belief that fatness was evidence of "savagery" and racial inferiority. The author argues that the contemporary ideal of slenderness is, at its very core, racialized and racist. Indeed, it was not until the early twentieth century, when racialized attitudes against fatness were already entrenched in the culture, that the medical establishment began its crusade against obesity. An important and original work, Fearing the Black Body argues convincingly that fat phobia isn't about health at all, but rather a means of using the body to validate race, class, and gender prejudice.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.92)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 7
3.5 3
4 11
4.5
5 10

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 208,957,381 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível